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Leatherman Multitools (1 Viewer)

LowDown

Curmudgeon
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I usually depend on my big Swiss Army Knife (the Swiss Army Champ) for my minor tool needs, but having left that at home and being in another city helping a set up a house I thought maybe it was time to get a Leatherman multitool. This is the combination tool in which the pliers are a big component with screwdrivers, knives, can openers, etc., included. Upon getting to the local hardware I found there were several alternatives to the Leatherman that were quite a bit less expensive, so I was tempted to go with one of them. But in the end I settled with the Leatherman because I'd always heard they were good.

Later on I found out why. We had purchased a curtain rod that was too long. It needed to be cut shorter, and we didn't have time to find a hacksaw. So I decided to use the saw tool on the Leatherman for the job. I expected that sawing through a metal rod would ruin the tool (it's supposed to be for wood), but I didn't see any future need for it. Twenty minutes of grunting, the curtain rod was the correct length, and the saw tool still looked like new, not even dulled a bit. Whatever they make the tools of is a really hard, strong stainless steel; I'm really impressed.
 
I usually depend on my big Swiss Army Knife (the Swiss Army Champ) for my minor tool needs, but having left that at home and being in another city helping a set up a house I thought maybe it was time to get a Leatherman multitool. This is the combination tool in which the pliers are a big component with screwdrivers, knives, can openers, etc., included. Upon getting to the local hardware I found there were several alternatives to the Leatherman that were quite a bit less expensive, so I was tempted to go with one of them. But in the end I settled with the Leatherman because I'd always heard they were good.

Later on I found out why. We had purchased a curtain rod that was too long. It needed to be cut shorter, and we didn't have time to find a hacksaw. So I decided to use the saw tool on the Leatherman for the job. I expected that sawing through a metal rod would ruin the tool (it's supposed to be for wood), but I didn't see any future need for it. Twenty minutes of grunting, the curtain rod was the correct length, and the saw tool still looked like new, not even dulled a bit. Whatever they make the tools of is a really hard, strong stainless steel; I'm really impressed.

I carry one of those when I backpack and keep one in the glove box of my cars but they are just to heavy and bulky to carry around all the time IMO. I'm still a Swiss army knife man.
 
I like to have a Leatherman and a bicycle tool (for allen wrenches, and because I use my bike a lot). Between those two, I've got most of the basics covered.
 
I carry one of those when I backpack and keep one in the glove box of my cars but they are just to heavy and bulky to carry around all the time IMO. I'm still a Swiss army knife man.

Yep. Their weight is a problem, but otherwise they are handy to have.
 
I usually depend on my big Swiss Army Knife (the Swiss Army Champ) for my minor tool needs, but having left that at home and being in another city helping a set up a house I thought maybe it was time to get a Leatherman multitool. This is the combination tool in which the pliers are a big component with screwdrivers, knives, can openers, etc., included. Upon getting to the local hardware I found there were several alternatives to the Leatherman that were quite a bit less expensive, so I was tempted to go with one of them. But in the end I settled with the Leatherman because I'd always heard they were good.

Later on I found out why. We had purchased a curtain rod that was too long. It needed to be cut shorter, and we didn't have time to find a hacksaw. So I decided to use the saw tool on the Leatherman for the job. I expected that sawing through a metal rod would ruin the tool (it's supposed to be for wood), but I didn't see any future need for it. Twenty minutes of grunting, the curtain rod was the correct length, and the saw tool still looked like new, not even dulled a bit. Whatever they make the tools of is a really hard, strong stainless steel; I'm really impressed.

My Leatherman Wave is the best tool I've ever owned. I use it a minimum of a dozen times a day. When I worked the maintenance shift in a sawmill I'd put a small pipe wrench in my back pocket and with that and my Leatherman I could fix any air leak in the mill.
I did manage to break the slot-screwdriver attachment, though, prying with it. I'm told they'd replace it if I sent it in but I'd be ashamed to admit how I broke it!
 
Victorinox Huntsman Lite FTW.

Best balance of tools/weight.

No pliers, but whatever.

Schrade made one with vise grips. But they changed factories or something and they just weren't the same. My friend who swore by them gave up after the third one on warranty broke too.
 
I usually depend on my big Swiss Army Knife (the Swiss Army Champ) for my minor tool needs, but having left that at home and being in another city helping a set up a house I thought maybe it was time to get a Leatherman multitool. This is the combination tool in which the pliers are a big component with screwdrivers, knives, can openers, etc., included. Upon getting to the local hardware I found there were several alternatives to the Leatherman that were quite a bit less expensive, so I was tempted to go with one of them. But in the end I settled with the Leatherman because I'd always heard they were good.

Later on I found out why. We had purchased a curtain rod that was too long. It needed to be cut shorter, and we didn't have time to find a hacksaw. So I decided to use the saw tool on the Leatherman for the job. I expected that sawing through a metal rod would ruin the tool (it's supposed to be for wood), but I didn't see any future need for it. Twenty minutes of grunting, the curtain rod was the correct length, and the saw tool still looked like new, not even dulled a bit. Whatever they make the tools of is a really hard, strong stainless steel; I'm really impressed.



Been carrying one on my belt for about 15 years. Had a GF once that objected to me wearing it on my belt to a nice restaurant... I got rid of her, kept the leatherman tool.....


I've gone all kinds of things with mine. (Leatherman Wave). Fixed a car brokedown on the roadside with nothing else...
 
I'd imagine the metal is some sort of tooling steel "less flexible, but quite hard". I've owned both a Leatherman and a Gerber multitool, both are fine tools, but the Leatherman certainly had a higher quality, albeit only marginally.
 
I have been gifted a few- not impressed, it sort of a jack of all trades master of none tool and I have found it too big, too bulky and too clumsy to do much. Rather have a small tool kit, proper tool for the job and all that. few of us are more than three steps away from a vehicle, pack or cargo bin where a few simple tools can make a 20 minute job a literal snap.
 
I usually depend on my big Swiss Army Knife (the Swiss Army Champ) for my minor tool needs, but having left that at home and being in another city helping a set up a house I thought maybe it was time to get a Leatherman multitool. This is the combination tool in which the pliers are a big component with screwdrivers, knives, can openers, etc., included. Upon getting to the local hardware I found there were several alternatives to the Leatherman that were quite a bit less expensive, so I was tempted to go with one of them. But in the end I settled with the Leatherman because I'd always heard they were good.

Later on I found out why. We had purchased a curtain rod that was too long. It needed to be cut shorter, and we didn't have time to find a hacksaw. So I decided to use the saw tool on the Leatherman for the job. I expected that sawing through a metal rod would ruin the tool (it's supposed to be for wood), but I didn't see any future need for it. Twenty minutes of grunting, the curtain rod was the correct length, and the saw tool still looked like new, not even dulled a bit. Whatever they make the tools of is a really hard, strong stainless steel; I'm really impressed.

for a general handyman,a leatherman is a great tool,and the strongest available in most stores.

if your using a multitool constantly though,id go with the gerber.it locks easy and quick opens.though they arent as rugged as a leatherman.

wave-fanned-bo.jpg
first the leatherman

Gerber_Multitool.jpg
now the gerber


the gerber in the bottom picture is identical to one of the 2 common military issue ones.as stated before they are more tailored for quick use and quick function,which is why i prefer them,plus they open quick like a switchblade.
 
for a general handyman,a leatherman is a great tool,and the strongest available in most stores.

if your using a multitool constantly though,id go with the gerber.it locks easy and quick opens.though they arent as rugged as a leatherman.

View attachment 67152283
first the leatherman

View attachment 67152284
now the gerber


the gerber in the bottom picture is identical to one of the 2 common military issue ones.as stated before they are more tailored for quick use and quick function,which is why i prefer them,plus they open quick like a switchblade.

This is good advice. The Leatherman are high quality and heavy duty strong but a little bulky and stiff. I've got a knockoff that has a few less functions but it's lighter and more flexible or smoother.
 
I have always hated the Leatherman tools. The pliers are totally inadequate in griping power and always pinched my fingers. Gimmicky crap if you ask me.
I am Chief Building Engineer at a large multi-national time share resort and a mechanic.
I will take a pair of needle nose vise-grips, a decent pocket knife and a ten in one screwdriver over a Leatherman tool any day.
These three tools take up about the same space to carry and I can do dozens of things a Leatherman could never accomplish.
 
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