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Kenya and Sudan Agree to Suspend Rules on Tea

sudanesia

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Sudan has suspended regulations it imposed on Kenyan tea last year, reducing Kenya’s tea
The group also visited tea factories as well as the Mombasa Tea Auction.Sudan had ordered a reduced shelf-life of tea, directing that it be sold within one and a half years of getting into its market, arguing this would help the country adhere to restrict health standards.
“The response is that all is well,” said SSMO’s deputy director and head of the delegation to Kenya Zakaria Suliman at the end of the fact-finding mission. “We have managed to kill three sparrows with one stone, let us now focus on the action plan.”
Last year, Sudan was ranked 7th largest importer of Kenyan tea after Pakistan, Egypt, UK, Afghanstan, UAE and Russia. She imported 19 million kilos of tea from Kenya.
Kenya and Sudan have also agreed to conduct a joint study on the shelf life of Kenyan tea, from next month until December 30, 2020. The two states also agreed on a mitigation plan during the period, when the suspension of the regulation is in place, where the stay on the suspension will be renewed after six months for one year, based on the results of the study.
“All Kenya tea being exported to Sudan will also be accompanied by a Certificate of Conformity from the Kenya Bureau of Standards,” said Kebs managing director Charles Ongwae. “SSMO also has the right to conduct a complete conformity assessment from time to time,” Ongwae added.
Sudan had imposed the regulations citing use of pesticides and GMO seeds, a claim Kenya has refuted.
“Our tea is quality tea, devoid of pesticides due to the climatic conditions of the areas it is grown,” said an official from the Agriculture Fisheries and Food Authority, Solomon Odera.
“We do not use GMO seeds and that is why our tea is a global commodity, which sold in 52 countries last year,” he said.
The two countries also agreed to revive an MoU signed in 2005, which according to Kebs MD Charles Ongwae, would have prevented this issue, had it been implemented.
The two groups have also agreed to nominate a joint committee and develop a training programme which will among others outline training in inspection and quality assurance.

shelf life from three years to one and a half. This follows two weeks of meetings and trips to tea farms in Kericho by a delegation from the Sudan Standards and Metrology Organisation.
Sudan Vision Daily
 
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Excon

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Sudan has suspended regulations it imposed on Kenyan tea last year, reducing Kenya’s tea
The group also visited tea factories as well as the Mombasa Tea Auction.Sudan had ordered a reduced shelf-life of tea, directing that it be sold within one and a half years of getting into its market, arguing this would help the country adhere to restrict health standards.
“The response is that all is well,” said SSMO’s deputy director and head of the delegation to Kenya Zakaria Suliman at the end of the fact-finding mission. “We have managed to kill three sparrows with one stone, let us now focus on the action plan.”
Last year, Sudan was ranked 7th largest importer of Kenyan tea after Pakistan, Egypt, UK, Afghanstan, UAE and Russia. She imported 19 million kilos of tea from Kenya.
Kenya and Sudan have also agreed to conduct a joint study on the shelf life of Kenyan tea, from next month until December 30, 2020. The two states also agreed on a mitigation plan during the period, when the suspension of the regulation is in place, where the stay on the suspension will be renewed after six months for one year, based on the results of the study.
“All Kenya tea being exported to Sudan will also be accompanied by a Certificate of Conformity from the Kenya Bureau of Standards,” said Kebs managing director Charles Ongwae. “SSMO also has the right to conduct a complete conformity assessment from time to time,” Ongwae added.
Sudan had imposed the regulations citing use of pesticides and GMO seeds, a claim Kenya has refuted.
“Our tea is quality tea, devoid of pesticides due to the climatic conditions of the areas it is grown,” said an official from the Agriculture Fisheries and Food Authority, Solomon Odera.
“We do not use GMO seeds and that is why our tea is a global commodity, which sold in 52 countries last year,” he said.
The two countries also agreed to revive an MoU signed in 2005, which according to Kebs MD Charles Ongwae, would have prevented this issue, had it been implemented.
The two groups have also agreed to nominate a joint committee and develop a training programme which will among others outline training in inspection and quality assurance.

shelf life from three years to one and a half. This follows two weeks of meetings and trips to tea farms in Kericho by a delegation from the Sudan Standards and Metrology Organisation.
Sudan Vision Daily

How about linking to the actual article?
 
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