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Kale

rhinefire

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I started eating Kale and it is interesting how many ways you can eat it. Some say steam for 3-4 mins. then some say one min. I steamed some for 20 min. and made creamed kale --dynomite!! Super good for you.
 

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I started eating Kale and it is interesting how many ways you can eat it. Some say steam for 3-4 mins. then some say one min. I steamed some for 20 min. and made creamed kale --dynomite!! Super good for you.

1. Chop kale thinly.
2. Fry onions, carrots and then tomatoes in oil.
3. Add kale, cover pot.
4. After a few minutes, add a little water and stir, cover.

Kale ready in 15 minutes.


We might note that spinach has a toxin that is bad in large quantities while kale is without that drawback.
 

ecofarm

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I would also like to note that while kale is a perennial (surviving year after year and continuing to produce), spinach (generally) is not. It's also much easier to deal with pests in regard to kale.
 

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1. Chop kale thinly.
2. Fry onions, carrots and then tomatoes in oil.
3. Add kale, cover pot.
4. After a few minutes, add a little water and stir, cover.

Kale ready in 15 minutes.


We might note that spinach has a toxin that is bad in large quantities while kale is without that drawback.

You forgot the garlic. :mrgreen:
 

ThePlayDrive

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Yeah, Kale is good in a lot of different recipes and it can be cooked in a lot of different ways. When I get the taste for potato chips, I'll often get some kale, put some olive oil over it and put it in the oven. It hits the spot and is healthier for me.
 

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I would also like to note that while kale is a perennial (surviving year after year and continuing to produce), spinach (generally) is not. It's also much easier to deal with pests in regard to kale.

Hmm? From what I've read it's a biennial. However, it's always grown (to my knowledge) as an annual.
 

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1. Chop kale thinly.
2. Fry onions, carrots and then tomatoes in oil.
3. Add kale, cover pot.
4. After a few minutes, add a little water and stir, cover.

Kale ready in 15 minutes.


We might note that spinach has a toxin that is bad in large quantities while kale is without that drawback.

You'd have to eat a LOT of spinach for the oxalic acid to be a problem, especially if you're cooking the spinach (which breaks down some of the oxalic acid).
 

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Hmm? From what I've read it's a biennial. However, it's always grown (to my knowledge) as an annual.

I've seen it years old, the stalk 2 inches diameter, the trunk bounding along the ground ~10 feet long. I've tended them for 2 years (and they were at least a year or two old when I started tending them). I suppose it depends on the producer. Perhaps I'll find the pic of the oldest kale I've ever seen, but I'm not digging for it now.

It was the major source of greens in the village I worked with. Everyone had kale that was 2-4 years old, huge kale (as described above) was rare. Nobody cut it after only 1 year; it takes that long to get a good stalk on it.
 
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rhinefire

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Yeah, Kale is good in a lot of different recipes and it can be cooked in a lot of different ways. When I get the taste for potato chips, I'll often get some kale, put some olive oil over it and put it in the oven. It hits the spot and is healthier for me.

The Kale I see in Houstn, Tx is not leafy. I am guessing there are different types. I would like to try to make some kale chips but it not being leafy it would appear to be a waste. One recipe I saw was to masage olive oil in to the kale for five minutes then eat! Is it any good for juiceing?
 

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I like to use it in minestrone soup.

Never had it as a chip, but I'd be willing to try it.
 

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I've seen it years old, the stalk 2 inches diameter, the trunk bounding along the ground ~10 feet long. I've tended them for 2 years (and they were at least a year or two old when I started tending them). I suppose it depends on the producer. Perhaps I'll find the pic of the oldest kale I've ever seen, but I'm not digging for it now.

It was the major source of greens in the village I worked with. Everyone had kale that was 2-4 years old, huge kale (as described above) was rare. Nobody cut it after only 1 year; it takes that long to get a good stalk on it.

It must depend on the variety/particular plant. I had some kale in my garden that came back this spring. It promptly bolted and flowered. I'm in zone 4a.
 

ecofarm

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It must depend on the variety/particular plant. I had some kale in my garden that came back this spring. It promptly bolted and flowered. I'm in zone 4a.

It's probably variety and climate. The village is cold - jackets and hats every day (~1800m elevation, the south side of Mt. Kenya). I'd estimate the normal temperature daytime is something ~70F and night ~60F. It rains, at night for a couple hours, about 8 months a year and the weather doesn't really change (.5` south of the equator). They do bolt, but that doesn't end their existence.
 

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It's probably variety and climate. The village is cold - jackets and hats every day (~1800m elevation, the south side of Mt. Kenya). I'd estimate the normal temperature daytime is something ~70F and night ~60F. It rains, at night for a couple hours, about 8 months a year and the weather doesn't really change (.5` south of the equator). They do bolt, but that doesn't end their existence.

People need jackets when it's 70F?
 

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People need jackets when it's 70F?

In the shade?

Good question. I'll need to finalize the temps (for my dissertation). During the winter months (southern hemisphere), some nights it were ~43 and summer some days were ~85 (perhaps a very rare 90+). That's the max range. It generally was closer in temp day/night.

As I mentioned, lots of sun and soft but full rain (at night, thus not interrupting labor) ~8 months/year.

For a general idea of climate consider that (like Miami, under two canopies and with irrigation) strawberries are perennial.
 
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ecofarm

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Of course, the temps in Miami are ~20F warmer, on average compared to Miami summer. Perennial strawberries were easier in the village.
 

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In the shade?

Good question. I'll need to finalize the temps (for my dissertation). During the winter months (southern hemisphere), some nights it were ~43 and summer some days were ~85 (perhaps a very rare 90+). That's the max range. It generally was closer in temp day/night.

I live in northern New England, so I guess I'm used to cooler temperatures.
 

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I live in northern New England, so I guess I'm used to cooler temperatures.

I figure leafy greens don't do well in winter. We don't have winter in Miami nor Kanja. Those (Miami due to the Gulf Stream) are tropical climates: rainy and dry (sometimes diurnal, annually [to borrow a term]) instead of seasons.
 
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There are only two ways I cook greens--either wilt it in bacon grease or boil it in water and drown it with vinegar. That is it. That is sufficient.
 

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I add kale & spinach to my juice in the morning. Is there a health advantage to Kale vs Flowering Kale (i.e. Purple) or are they basically the same?
 

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I live in northern New England, so I guess I'm used to cooler temperatures.

Me too! I'd kill for 43 degrees in the wintertime. :lol:
 

ChrisL

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It's not at all uncommon to have temps in the 70's, at least sporadically, during January here.

That would be VERY uncommon for here in NE. I remember one winter years ago when it really didn't below 30 or 40 for most of the winter, and that was a very warm winter for us. :) It was very nice too!
 

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The Kale I see in Houstn, Tx is not leafy. I am guessing there are different types. I would like to try to make some kale chips but it not being leafy it would appear to be a waste. One recipe I saw was to masage olive oil in to the kale for five minutes then eat! Is it any good for juiceing?

To those cooking your kale.. use a healthy oil like virgin olive oil
But it should be noted that cooking any vegetable begins destroying the vital phytonutrients that make kale a superfood.

Juicing? Sure.. but smoothies are better.

1-2 oz of natural juice concetrate
1 cup of pineapple
4 large strawberries
6 oz of almond or coconut milk
2-3 cups of ice

makes two servings

puree the juice concentrate and kale
then add the fruit of your choice, nut milks and ice... blend... enjoy!

Here isn a recent article on kale... Drew Ramsey, M.D.: This Is Your Brain on Kale
 
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