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Jewish population in Israel is declining

Lord Tammerlain

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Jewish population in Israel is declining - Haaretz Daily Newspaper | Israel News

Ignore the somewhat sensationalist title, as it is somewhat misleading in nature. What is occuring is the % of the Population of Jews in Israel, (proper and occupied territories is declining.

What is so encouraging about the figures for 2010? I found that within Israel, Jews constitute 75.5 percent of the population, but that the proportion in 1998 was 79.2 percent, and 81.7 percent in 1988. In other words, the percentage of Jews in the Israeli population is constantly declining, in spite of the influx of about 1 million immigrants over the past two decades. \

According to the forecasts, in 2015 the percentage of Jews will decline to 73.5 percent, and will drop to 70.6 percent by 2025. Only in 2030 will there be, for the first time, a miniscule increase in the proportion of Jews, bringing us to 72 percent. What is there here to make Arens happy?

snip

But I don't rely on American teams, and instead turn to the head of the Civil Administration in the Israel Defense Forces, who reports to me that there are presently about 2.6 million Palestinians living in Judea and Samaria, and in Gaza their number is estimated at 1.5 million. Anyone who doesn't rely on the IDF can access the figures of the Palestinian statistics bureau, whose last census was held in 2007, under the aegis of representatives of the Norwegian government; their numbers are similar to those of the IDF (after subtracting the residents of Jerusalem who were already counted by the Israeli statistics bureau ). In both cases it turns out that, not counting Gaza or foreign residents, Jews constitute 59 percent of the total population in the Land of Israel. If you do count Gaza and foreign residents, there are somewhat fewer Jews than there are Palestinian Arabs

snip

There is no choice but to tell Arens that the right-wing Betar ideology on which he was raised went bankrupt a long time ago and it won't help if he virtually erases 1.5 million Arabs from the territories. They are here. The conclusion is frighteningly simple: Whoever brings about the establishment of a single binational state in the Land of Israel will doom the Jews of Israel to destruction. We, the sane majority who still live here, will not allow anyone to do that

The demographic issue was I believe the reason Sharon decided to pull out of Gaza.
 

washunut

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Jewish population in Israel is declining - Haaretz Daily Newspaper | Israel News

Ignore the somewhat sensationalist title, as it is somewhat misleading in nature. What is occuring is the % of the Population of Jews in Israel, (proper and occupied territories is declining.



The demographic issue was I believe the reason Sharon decided to pull out of Gaza.

I think you are wrong about that. Israel had a relatively few settlers there. They had to protect them though so there was a drain on the IDF. They were never going to keep any of it in a peace deal so why bother with it.
 

William Rea

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Jewish population in Israel is declining - Haaretz Daily Newspaper | Israel News

Ignore the somewhat sensationalist title, as it is somewhat misleading in nature. What is occuring is the % of the Population of Jews in Israel, (proper and occupied territories is declining.

The demographic issue was I believe the reason Sharon decided to pull out of Gaza.

Correction on the article. There aren't 2.6 million Palestinians living in Judea and Samaria. There might be 2.6 million living in the West bank though.
 

danstevens80

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Correction on the article. There aren't 2.6 million Palestinians living in Judea and Samaria. There might be 2.6 million living in the West bank though.

Correction #2: There might be a TOTAL 2.6 million Palestinians in the whole region.
 

Mika-El

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Jewish population in Israel is declining - Haaretz Daily Newspaper | Israel News

Ignore the somewhat sensationalist title, as it is somewhat misleading in nature. What is occuring is the % of the Population of Jews in Israel, (proper and occupied territories is declining.



The demographic issue was I believe the reason Sharon decided to pull out of Gaza.

It is reasonable to conclude it might have been a secondary reason in my humble opinion. I think the primary reason was a genuine attempt to try kick start peace and see if withdrawal could work. If it could have worked in Gaza there was reason to believe it could have also worked on the West Bank.

For Israel all it did was prove even when they withdraw, they would still be attacked. It in fact showed that the rhetoric Israel was only being attacked for being in Gaza was a crock.

It was the second time. Israel also withdrew from Lebanon after Hezbollah claimed it only remained armed and in existence because Israel was in Lebanon and as soon as Israel left it would disarm.

After Israel left Lebanon, Hezbollah not only refused to disarm violating the UN treaty it had entered into to disarm, but escalated its arms and control of Southern Lebanon and assisted Syria and Iran by serving as both's proxy army of occupation in Lebanon which it still is to this day.

The fact is if Israel withdrew from the West Bank there is absolutely no reason to believe another Gaza or Lebanon would happen all over again. Mr. Abbas has no physical control of thousands of militant Palestinians on the West Bank and there is no guarantee if he started a nation there he could control them. He could very well be disposed of by Hamas or Hezbollah both operating on the West Bank through cells and in association with Fatah Hawks.

All that said, I still believe in a two state solution if it is possible and I think Israeli settlers are a real obstacle to peace talks as are extremists on both sides and Palestinian and non Palestinian terrorists operating against Israel in the Middle East.

I also personally do not believe Lieberman is being genuine when he states peace talks need another generation before they can recommence. To say that while continuing to encourage expansion of settlement by Israelis on the West Bank can not be read in isolation. The two are necessarily linked and if Lieberman believes in both, what he in practicality is saying he wants another 20 years of Israeli expansion on the West Bank.

If there are to be meaningful peace talks no Israel can not expect moderate Palestinians to sit back twenty years watching Israeli settlement continue to expand on the West Bank. Where would they be expected to live? Where would they be expected to have their country?

Lieberman to me is playing games and Netanyahu in my opinion does not have the mandate to engage in peace talks since his coalition is supported by the most part my members of his own party and other parties who do not want a two state solution.

I am a strong supporter of Israel's right to exist and I lived in Israel when I was younmg as a volunteer and worked on a kibburz, etc., but for me and many genuine supporters of Israel?Zionists, we believe if certain Israeli politicians do not want a two state solution then they should stop couching their words like Lieberman whichinsult people's intelligence with their not so subtle agenda of expansion.

I support the Kadima position and Barak's position not Netanyahu's or Liberman's. My bias is open and not hidden. It is my opinion only. I do not presume to speak for Israelis or say what is best for them.

I also think people should genuinely understand to continually expect Israel to make peace concessions while the PA refuses to recognize its right to be a Jewish state is just as much an obstacle to peace as any Israeli expansionists.

I take the approach Donald Sutherland has stated before and I have stated before. It reflects the views of I the Kadima-Labour coalition or pretty much the Canadian or US foreign policy view in support of a two state solution with safeguards against terrorism and equal opportunity for Palestinians and Israelis.

I do think its possible. Israel would be faced with severe internal opposition as would the PA. Both governments of the day would be faced with extreme resistance. But its possible if compensation for aggrieved parties on boths ideas can be balanced and addressed.

I think its possible for Israel to withdraw from the West Bank but maintain safe buffer zones to defend it from incoming terrorists.
 
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Hyena

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This just means that arabs prefer to live in Israel than in arab countries...
 

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This just means that arabs prefer to live in Israel than in arab countries...

Well they do, that is a no brainer. Arab Israelis have the highest standard of living in the Middle East and have made it clear they will never give up Israeli citizenship for Palestinian citizenship in any long range peace deal. That is just a fact.

As much as some claim Israel is a racist and apartheid state the Arab Israeli standard of living speaks for itself as do their land rights enforced in the Supreme Court of Israel, their elected Knesset members, seperate court system on family law and religious matters, etc., not to mention their access to the exact same medical facilities as Israeli Jews.

That said they do encounter political discrimination at the municipal level for funding of neighbourhoods and on a grass roots level the inability to differentiate between anti Israeli Palestinians and Israeli Arabs often means they are the brunt of tension and hatred when a terrorist attack happens and its pretty much difficult to get a good job in Israel no matter who you are if you do not serve in the IDF and get security clearance which can effect Israeli Arabs, but yes for the most part they prefer Israel.

The polls say that time and time again as have they made clear. In fact they are a major player in any future two state solutions for obvious reasons. They fear being caught in an exchange of populations if settlers are sent back into Israel.

However the laws of Israel treat Israeli Arabs no different then they do Israeli Jews-that much is clear in the legal precedents set so they are in fact far more secure in Israel then any Jew could ever be in a Sharia law nation and therein lies the irony.

The very thing Muslim states have demonstrated they will not give non Muslims in their nations, the Jewish state gives Muslims in its state.
 

CJ 2.0

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That said they do encounter political discrimination at the municipal level for funding of neighbourhoods and on a grass roots level the inability to differentiate between anti Israeli Palestinians and Israeli Arabs often means they are the brunt of tension and hatred when a terrorist attack happens and its pretty much difficult to get a good job in Israel no matter who you are if you do not serve in the IDF and get security clearance which can effect Israeli Arabs, but yes for the most part they prefer Israel.

to what extent are municipal funding differences a product of taxation revenues collected by those municipalities? My understanding is that unicipal services are worse in predominantly Arab towns because municipal tax revenues are significantly lower per capita.

That's not political discrimination, it's complaining about not receiving a large enough subsidy. Much like the ultra orthodox, so nothing unique about that, but symantics are important in all this.
 

ido_

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to what extent are municipal funding differences a product of taxation revenues collected by those municipalities? My understanding is that unicipal services are worse in predominantly Arab towns because municipal tax revenues are significantly lower per capita.

That's not political discrimination, it's complaining about not receiving a large enough subsidy. Much like the ultra orthodox, so nothing unique about that, but symantics are important in all this.

Exactly, a few years ago there was a big reform in the local athorities goverment system. The ministry of internal affairs agreed to help those who will enter this reform. Many arab local athorities are bankrupt because they simply do not collect taxes, and the taxes themselves are way lower than those in major cities or Jewish comunities. I don't think that arab athorities recieve less funding than jewish athorities in the same area.
 

Mika-El

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to what extent are municipal funding differences a product of taxation revenues collected by those municipalities? My understanding is that unicipal services are worse in predominantly Arab towns because municipal tax revenues are significantly lower per capita.

That's not political discrimination, it's complaining about not receiving a large enough subsidy. Much like the ultra orthodox, so nothing unique about that, but symantics are important in all this.

You raise a valid point I acknowledge and I found this reference for:
(source: The Bottom Line / Arab municipalities do not believe in equality in debts - Haaretz Daily Newspaper | Israel News)

" Municipal funding: A major factor in the situation of some of the Arab towns can be traced to statistical figures showing that Arab towns in Israel are reluctant to collect city taxes from their residents. "The Arab authorities demand equal rights, but they forget that first of all they have to fulfil the same duties that the Jewish authorities do, first and foremost, to collect tax from the residents," complain Jerusalem circles. Without tax collection, the Arab towns are in a state of perpetual crisis, and all plans and programs to better their lot go nowhere. They can't pay their workers and the distance from there to a nationwide strike is short indeed."

However, I ask you to consider this paper from the Bank of Israel directly on this topic at;

http://www.bankisrael.gov.il/deptdata/mehkar/papers/dp0501e.pdf

and in particular these comments on page 11:

"Other studies directly examined differences in the allocation of public resources between
Jewish and Arab localities. Zeira and Strawczynsky (2002) demonstrate the bias against the
Arab sector by comparing public expenditure per student in the Arab sector with that in the
Jewish sector – controlling for other factors that could influence this expenditure. Justman
and Spivak (2001) find that the general grants transferred to Arab local authorities were
substantially lower than those allocated to Jewish ones and Lavi (1999) identifies
discrimination in the disbursement of education funding – although the latter two studies
suggest that the magnitude of discrimination has decreased in recent years. Razin (1999)
finds that government funding of Arab local authorities is markedly lower than that of
Jewish localities, and Shachor (2003) – controlling for population size, socio-economic
status and location – finds significantly lower transfers to the Arab localities than to Jewish
and Druz ones, although he also shows that the gap narrowed between 1994 and 2000.6 "

and these comments on page 12:

"If minority localities are characterized by a high proportion of
people in need of local welfare services, it may lead to a lower inclination to carry the
burden of these services, despite the ethnic homogeneity of the locality. As Lassen (2003)
argues, the success in tax collection depends to a large degree on the perceived yield on
taxes to the payee. If, due to the above factors, taxpayers feel that they do not receive the
desired services in return for their taxes, and in an efficient manner, their incentive to pay
these taxes will decline (Slemord, 2001)."

Now herein lies the problem as stated on page 13:

"National laws and regulations determine substantial discounts for various population groups, such as
handicapped people, recipients of income support, elderly individuals, and families with a
large number of children."

The above is very much a political process.

If as is the present case Arab Israelis are not getting the same national funding, they have less incentive to pay taxes. That is further fueled by other factors that add to their malaise and feeling of being second class and having no incentive to pay taxes such as the pragmatic reality of not being able to get security clearance for better paying jobs unless they volunteer for the IDF which most will not.

That security issue which prevades all economic activities in Israel and acts as a pragmatic barrier to work, fuels the lack of paying taxes.

So its a complex issue and its far more complex as the Bank of Israel explains then low tax collection rates and why on page 19 the Bank of Israel's analysis states:

"...discrimination creates a sense of mistrust in other
people, reduces self-efficacy and hurts the minority's members' motivation to improve their
situation. As a result, the quality of management in localities dominated by an ethnic
minority could be harmed, which in turn would harm the efficiency of tax collection and
reduce the willingness of the residents to pay local taxes."...

and on page 20...

"One of the key links between perceived discrimination and tax obedience is trust, as
highlighted, for example, by Scholz.19 Against this background, it is important to examine
whether the disadvantaged economic and social position of Arabs in Israel is accompanied
by lower degree of trust in people than is the case among the Jewish public."

It certainly is a complex issue.
 

ido_

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But looking at a Jewish-Arab sector in analysis is wrong. In a study such as this you should look at two local athorities at the same region, many Jewish athorities at the Galil were also bankrupt, same goes for the northern Negev towns. Israeli Arabs are concentrated mainly in those areas which were neglected for years by the Israeli goverment, most of the funding went to the development of the Tel Aviv metropolin area and Jerusalem metropolin area. And most of Israel's citizens are concentrated in those two metropolins, the question is- was there a discrimination of between two local athorities in the same region - I believe not.
 

CJ 2.0

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You raise a valid point I acknowledge and I found this reference for:
(source: The Bottom Line / Arab municipalities do not believe in equality in debts - Haaretz Daily Newspaper | Israel News)

" Municipal funding: A major factor in the situation of some of the Arab towns can be traced to statistical figures showing that Arab towns in Israel are reluctant to collect city taxes from their residents. "The Arab authorities demand equal rights, but they forget that first of all they have to fulfil the same duties that the Jewish authorities do, first and foremost, to collect tax from the residents," complain Jerusalem circles. Without tax collection, the Arab towns are in a state of perpetual crisis, and all plans and programs to better their lot go nowhere. They can't pay their workers and the distance from there to a nationwide strike is short indeed."

However, I ask you to consider this paper from the Bank of Israel directly on this topic at;

http://www.bankisrael.gov.il/deptdata/mehkar/papers/dp0501e.pdf

and in particular these comments on page 11:

"Other studies directly examined differences in the allocation of public resources between
Jewish and Arab localities. Zeira and Strawczynsky (2002) demonstrate the bias against the
Arab sector by comparing public expenditure per student in the Arab sector with that in the
Jewish sector – controlling for other factors that could influence this expenditure. Justman
and Spivak (2001) find that the general grants transferred to Arab local authorities were
substantially lower than those allocated to Jewish ones and Lavi (1999) identifies
discrimination in the disbursement of education funding – although the latter two studies
suggest that the magnitude of discrimination has decreased in recent years. Razin (1999)
finds that government funding of Arab local authorities is markedly lower than that of
Jewish localities, and Shachor (2003) – controlling for population size, socio-economic
status and location – finds significantly lower transfers to the Arab localities than to Jewish
and Druz ones, although he also shows that the gap narrowed between 1994 and 2000.6 "

and these comments on page 12:

"If minority localities are characterized by a high proportion of
people in need of local welfare services, it may lead to a lower inclination to carry the
burden of these services, despite the ethnic homogeneity of the locality. As Lassen (2003)
argues, the success in tax collection depends to a large degree on the perceived yield on
taxes to the payee. If, due to the above factors, taxpayers feel that they do not receive the
desired services in return for their taxes, and in an efficient manner, their incentive to pay
these taxes will decline (Slemord, 2001)."

Now herein lies the problem as stated on page 13:

"National laws and regulations determine substantial discounts for various population groups, such as
handicapped people, recipients of income support, elderly individuals, and families with a
large number of children."

The above is very much a political process.

If as is the present case Arab Israelis are not getting the same national funding, they have less incentive to pay taxes. That is further fueled by other factors that add to their malaise and feeling of being second class and having no incentive to pay taxes such as the pragmatic reality of not being able to get security clearance for better paying jobs unless they volunteer for the IDF which most will not.

That security issue which prevades all economic activities in Israel and acts as a pragmatic barrier to work, fuels the lack of paying taxes.

So its a complex issue and its far more complex as the Bank of Israel explains then low tax collection rates and why on page 19 the Bank of Israel's analysis states:

"...discrimination creates a sense of mistrust in other
people, reduces self-efficacy and hurts the minority's members' motivation to improve their
situation. As a result, the quality of management in localities dominated by an ethnic
minority could be harmed, which in turn would harm the efficiency of tax collection and
reduce the willingness of the residents to pay local taxes."...

and on page 20...

"One of the key links between perceived discrimination and tax obedience is trust, as
highlighted, for example, by Scholz.19 Against this background, it is important to examine
whether the disadvantaged economic and social position of Arabs in Israel is accompanied
by lower degree of trust in people than is the case among the Jewish public."

It certainly is a complex issue.

All valid, and indeed it is complex. One additional factor to keep in mind though is the practice of "matching" contributions by other governments. In Canada, for example, the federal and provincial govenrments often contribute to general and special projects on a contribution basis - e.g., by matching funds provided by the municipal or other levels of government. To the extent a government in a local area attempts to minimize tax burdens on local residents by offloading responsibility to higher levels of government, the higher levels of government may be reluctant to contribute funds to special projects. After all, they know any contribution will not in fact increase expenditures on those projects but will be diverted to other unfunded pet projects or used to keep the municipal tax burden low.

The issue that should be examined, at the core, is whether the Arab sector is a net contributor or net drain on public resources. To the extent that they are a net drain, it means that what they are complaining about is not receiving a sufficient subsidy from the rest of society (in the same way the ultra-religious sector does).

That would be an important thing to consider, though that does NOT mean they should not be entitled to what they get or anything like that.

One thing that is constantly lost in all this talk of state support is the responsibility of individuals and individual communities to better their own lots. Throwing money at schooling is not helpful, as numerous US studies have shown. What matters is quality, as well as the goals and methods of the community, including individual students and families, in pursuing education. It isn 't always somebody else's fault when an individul or subset of individuals achieves bad outcomes. People need to take resposnsibility for their own situations.

Sorry, just a bit of a right wing rant thrown in for good measure to keep this in the proper frame of reference.
 

Mika-El

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All valid, and indeed it is complex. One additional factor to keep in mind though is the practice of "matching" contributions by other governments. In Canada, for example, the federal and provincial govenrments often contribute to general and special projects on a contribution basis - e.g., by matching funds provided by the municipal or other levels of government. To the extent a government in a local area attempts to minimize tax burdens on local residents by offloading responsibility to higher levels of government, the higher levels of government may be reluctant to contribute funds to special projects. After all, they know any contribution will not in fact increase expenditures on those projects but will be diverted to other unfunded pet projects or used to keep the municipal tax burden low.

The issue that should be examined, at the core, is whether the Arab sector is a net contributor or net drain on public resources. To the extent that they are a net drain, it means that what they are complaining about is not receiving a sufficient subsidy from the rest of society (in the same way the ultra-religious sector does).

That would be an important thing to consider, though that does NOT mean they should not be entitled to what they get or anything like that.

One thing that is constantly lost in all this talk of state support is the responsibility of individuals and individual communities to better their own lots. Throwing money at schooling is not helpful, as numerous US studies have shown. What matters is quality, as well as the goals and methods of the community, including individual students and families, in pursuing education. It isn 't always somebody else's fault when an individul or subset of individuals achieves bad outcomes. People need to take resposnsibility for their own situations.

Sorry, just a bit of a right wing rant thrown in for good measure to keep this in the proper frame of reference.

excellent points. lol. I am not quite so sure if they are right wing rants. they could easily pass as intelligent comments. I think your analogy of certain Arab communities to the ultra-orthodox Jewish ones (many of who do not even believe in the state of Israel's existence) is a dead on analogy.

What we also forget is not only do Arab Israelis face social assimilation issues but so do Mitzrahi (Tsfardic) Jews from Arab countries, Ethiopian Jews, gay Jews, on and on. This notion that people in Israel live in a utopia state except for Arab Israelis is just not true. Many groups face similar issues. Its not simply as some believe specific only to Arab Jews.

In addition Arab Israelis and Beduin Israelis although considered by many to both be Arab Israelis have far different assimilation issues. Druze also have their special issues.

I think we should also understand municipal politics in Israel is a lot like municipal politics in the U.S. or other Western nations. There is a lot of partisan kickbacks and influence peddling with contractors. Municipal politics is a dog's breakfast in any country you go to in terms of zoning adjustments and permits.
 

ab9924

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Jewish population in Israel is declining - Haaretz Daily Newspaper | Israel News

Ignore the somewhat sensationalist title, as it is somewhat misleading in nature. What is occuring is the % of the Population of Jews in Israel, (proper and occupied territories is declining.



The demographic issue was I believe the reason Sharon decided to pull out of Gaza.

If the Israelies didn't hate everyone so badly, then Israel could realize that they are not alone. There are many seemingly peaceful countries around that have been at the verge of losing their land ever since ww2. Hungary could be one prominent example. If Israel had any global outlook and a scientific mindset to add to international politics, then it could cooperatively produce a world-wide framework of empowering such countries. But Israel thinks that guns are the only answer and the only god, pretty much like half of Europe, so no wonder Israel's people will become an ever shrinking minority. It is countries like Israel that give the license to everyone that ethnic violence is good, just keep reloading your gun.
 
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mbig

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If the Israelies didn't hate everyone so badly, then Israel could realize that they are not alone. There are many seemingly peaceful countries around that have been at the verge of losing their land ever since ww2. Hungary could be one prominent example. If Israel had any global outlook and a scientific mindset to add to international politics, then it could cooperatively produce a world-wide framework of empowering such countries. But Israel thinks that guns are the only answer and the only god, pretty much like half of Europe, so no wonder Israel's people will become an ever shrinking minority. It is countries like Israel that give the license to everyone that ethnic violence is good, just keep reloading your gun.
What an utterly baseless and biased post.
Bafflingly reviving a 2 year old Off-topic (to the venom) string to make it.
What does "Israel hating everyone else" have to with with Percentage population decline.
 

ab9924

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What an utterly baseless and biased post.
Bafflingly reviving a 2 year old Off-topic (to the venom) string to make it.
What does "Israel hating everyone else" have to with with Percentage population decline.

What is baseless and biassed in it?

When you invent and incite ethnic violance, like Israel does (and Slavonic East Europe does), then you essentially proclaim that you want to kill your neighboring ethnic groups. But what do you do when those ethnic groups simply outnumber you? You can keep killing them (as permanent on TV news), but they will start to kill you back and you are fewer than them. Simple mathematics, you will first become a minority, then a scatter, then you will be history, as long as the kill rates are equal. Israel would have to increment its kill rate by a factor that equals the muslim/jew population ratio, but the international community has prevented you to achieve this. What is interesting is that Israel has absolutely no alternative plan, not even as a mental excercise.
 

mbig

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What is baseless and biassed in it?

When you invent and incite ethnic violance, like Israel does
(and Slavonic East Europe does), then you essentially proclaim that you want to kill your neighboring ethnic groups.
What?
Your first sentence, ie, IS baseless and biased as well as the entire post before that. ([no] "Global outlook" [no] "scientifc mindset"!)
Care to back them?
In fact, the reverse is true. It's always been Muslim-Arab hate for the Jews; and of course Christians who'be been heavily purged throughout the Middle East.
Again, the rest of your first post in the string as well, was completely baseless 'stuff', you haven't even attempted to justify.

In case you haven't noticed, that's why South Sudan was just created (!) to separate/protect the Blacker animist/Christian South from the more Arabo-Muslim North.
Lets Blame those 'Ethnic supremacist' South Sudanese.
And why there are 50,000 Black Sudanese refugees (including Muslims) in ISRAEL instead of Racist Arab countries like Egypt they perilously scurried THROUGH to get there.


What is interesting is that Israel has absolutely no alternative plan, not even as a mental excercise.
"Alternative plan" for what? Existence?
 
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ab9924

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What?
Your first sentence, ie, IS baseless and biased as well as the entire post before that. ([no] "Global outlook" [no] "scientifc mindset"!)
Care to back them?
In fact, the reverse is true. It's always been Muslim-Arab hate for the Jews; and of course Christians who'be been heavily purged throughout the Middle East.
Again, the rest of your first post in the string as well, was completely baseless 'stuff', you haven't even attempted to justify.

In case you haven't noticed, that's why South Sudan was just created (!) to separate/protect the Blacker animist/Christian South from the more Arabo-Muslim North.
Lets Blame those 'Ethnic supremacist' South Sudanese.
And why there are 50,000 Black Sudanese refugees (including Muslims) in ISRAEL instead of Racist Arab countries like Egypt they perilously scurried THROUGH to get there.



"Alternative plan" for what? Existence?

You make it sound like other (European) countries didn't have to make alternative plans for their existance. Have you heard of Szekler Land (central Europe) for example? And I am a Christian, I am on the side of the South Sudanese. But my point is this: when you (your country) is being flooded with zombies (okay call them muslims, the name of the enemy is immaterial), then what do you do? Guns don't work all the way. Has Israel ever come up with even a try for an idea?

If South Sudan works, that is VERY good, but the difference is that in South Sudan the majority IS Christian. In Israel the majority is not jewish. And I oppose deportations and playing with majority-minority assignments of country borders where there is no ethnic border in geography, such as in Israel (unlike Sudan).
 

mbig

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You make it sound like other (European) countries didn't have to make alternative plans for their existance. Have you heard of Szekler Land (central Europe) for example? And I am a Christian, I am on the side of the South Sudanese. But my point is this: when you (your country) is being flooded with zombies (okay call them muslims, the name of the enemy is immaterial), then what do you do? Guns don't work all the way. Has Israel ever come up with even a try for an idea?
This isn't even sane reply and has dropped All your previous and Baseless slander as I called you on those Bigoted premises and you couldn't back Any of them!
Splash 1.

If South Sudan works, that is VERY good, but the difference is that in South Sudan the majority IS Christian. In Israel the majority is not jewish.
!
Israel is 75% Jewish. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_Israel#Jews
Splash II.
If it was 100% Jewish you would blame the for that too, of course.

Your post are Ridiculous and necessarily Flee from one goofy Wrong claim to another, unburdened by/not-responsible for what you said in the last.
 
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This isn't even sane reply and has dropped All your previous and Baseless slander as I called you on those Bigoted premises and you couldn't back Any of them!
Splash 1.


!
Israel is 75% Jewish. Demographics of Israel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Splash II.
If it was 100% Jewish you would blame the for that too, of course.

Your post are Ridiculous and necessarily Flee from one goofy Wrong claim to another, unburdened/not-responsible by what you said in the last.

No.

This thread claims that Israel is only 65 % jewish and decreasing.

Also, this thread claims that the state of Israel withdrew from Gaza simply because of negative population dynamics. This is like France withdrawing from Marseilles for the negative French/Algerian population change ratio or level.

You have a problem. Soon you will be a minority in your own country where the majority doesn't even just coexist with you but actively hates you and wants to get rid of you. Then what do you do? Israel has to realize that guns are not going to buy their answers, simply not powerful enough. And no jewish person seems mentally capable to even comprehend this situation, so far.
 

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ab9924 #18 said:
....the difference is that in South Sudan the majority IS Christian. In Israel the majority is Not jewish.
ab09924 #20 said:
No. This thread claims that Israel is only 65 % jewish and decreasing.
I could swear 65% IS a majority. (even using your number for arguments sake)
What a Joke your posts are.

ab9924 said:
You have a problem. Soon you will be a minority in your own country where the majority doesn't even just coexist with you but actively hates you and wants to get rid of you. Then what do you do? Israel has to realize that guns are not going to buy their answers, simply not powerful enough. And no jewish person seems mentally capable to even comprehend this situation, so far.
I'm an American 100%. Never even been to Israel.

Your every post is Ignorant slander and you Cannot back a single thing you said. NOT ONE.
In fact, Now we have you impeaching Yourself in re "majority"
 
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I could swear 65% IS a majority. (even using your number for arguments sake)
What a Joke your posts are.

I'm an American 100%. Never even been to Israel.

Your every post is Ignorant slander and you Cannot back a single thing you said. NOT ONE.
In fact, Now we have you impeaching Yourself in re "majority"

No. A majority is a problem mostly in democracies. Which is why I have my reservations against democracies. Good that we Americans were given a Republic by our Founding Fathers, complete with an Electoral College, instead of a democracy.

Interesting that no other country, including Israel was able to adopt this philosophy.

I still maintain, like I have been saying throughout this thread, that a majority based government is a mob government, and Israel should move away from that, in order to preserve its future, population wise and otherwise.
 
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