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Japan And Bulgaria Pull Out

V.I. Lenin

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I have to wonder ( and I apolgize I didn't read the link, no time) If the UK is reducing the number of soliders at all. I mean, the Labor (or Labour) party is under attack now thanks to Blair's entry into the war, has the UK at all limited the number of troops sent or withdrawn any?
 

akyron

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GarzaUK said:
Looks like the "mother of all coalitions" is dwindling again. Japan and Bulgaria plan to pull out by the end of the year, Poland is reducing it's forces, Ukraine has been withdrawing.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/4523857.stm


That is about right. As the area stabilizes over time the need for more troops will dwindle and eventually almost everyone will "pull out".
 

GarzaUK

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V.I. Lenin said:
I have to wonder ( and I apolgize I didn't read the link, no time) If the UK is reducing the number of soliders at all. I mean, the Labor (or Labour) party is under attack now thanks to Blair's entry into the war, has the UK at all limited the number of troops sent or withdrawn any?
The British people believe the government made a mistake in going to Iraq. We are not especially suspicious of the motives for this war. The Downing memo showed the British public that war was on the agenda as early as summer 2002. This wasn't a war of WMD's, this was a war of Regime is Change - illegal in international law.

But we also feel that the Iraqi's should not suffer for the mistakes we made. Most of us want to leave Iraq to be able to stand on its two feet, we owe that much to the Iraqis who have suffered incredibly through our ignorance and warmongering.

Plus our sector is pretty peaceful anyway compared to the American sector, I heard this is because the British have a "less in your face" approach to the civilians.
 
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GarzaUK

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akyron said:
That is about right. As the area stabilizes over time the need for more troops will dwindle and eventually almost everyone will "pull out".
Have you read the Iraq news on the recent weeks, the scale of attacks have increased in the past month, not decreased.
 

akyron

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GarzaUK said:
Have you read the Iraq news on the recent weeks, the scale of attacks have increased in the past month, not decreased.

The elections will not magically transform Iraq or significantly dampen short-term violence. Building a stable democracy requires much more than elections, but the elections will set the stage for greater Iraqi control over their own future, help drain away the insurgency's popular support, and encourage greater Iraqi efforts to defeat the insurgency.

-James Phillips is Research Fellow in Middle Eastern Studies in the Douglas and Sarah Allison Center for Foreign Policy Studies, a division of the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for International Studies, at The Heritage Foundation.


Patience
 

ShamMol

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akyron said:
The elections will not magically transform Iraq or significantly dampen short-term violence. Building a stable democracy requires much more than elections, but the elections will set the stage for greater Iraqi control over their own future, help drain away the insurgency's popular support, and encourage greater Iraqi efforts to defeat the insurgency.

-James Phillips is Research Fellow in Middle Eastern Studies in the Douglas and Sarah Allison Center for Foreign Policy Studies, a division of the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for International Studies, at The Heritage Foundation.


Patience
Patience? When attacks are increasing, when the government that we have put in place doesn't have the support of all the people? When more kids are getting killed? I see no reason to be patient in a war which we should never have been in.

It was a big thing for Japan to send troops, I believe it was their first military step since World War II, at least they saw how wrong it was. If only we could realize if we stay we will be there for years and years to come with more kids getting killed.
 
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