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Is the Bill of Rights based on the Ten Commandments? (1 Viewer)

Somerville

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Retired general and conspiracy theorist Michael Flynn spoke at a campaign rally this past Saturday for MAGA pastor Jackson Lahmeyer who is running against fellow Republican, Sen. James Lankford. During his rather incoherent speech, I guess he learned from Donnie, that America needs to get back to the Christianity that the nation was founded upon. After stating that the word "Creator" may be read four times in the Constitution, he also said the following:
“When you go home, look at the Bill of Rights and lay the Ten Commandments right down next to them,” Flynn continued. “Put them right next to each other, and you’ll get a sense of how they developed the Bill of Rights. The rights that the Creator gave us. These are God-given rights; these are not man-given rights.”

“Then you take two other documents, our Constitution and for those who study the Bible, and you look at those two documents because there’s so much [in common],” Flynn added. “The Constitution and the Bible, those two documents are the fulfillment of the promises in the Bill of Rights and the Ten Commandments. That is what gives us our ability to be able to be this free, just unbelievable country that we are.”

If the Bill of Rights isn't based on the Ten Commandments, what is the origin of those enumerated rights?

In case you don't know, the word "Creator" is not in the Constitution nor is the word "God".
 
The Bill of Rights was inspired largely by three existing documents - - the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights [1689], and the Massachusetts Body of Liberties [1641].

Virginia delegate George Mason had a lot to with establishing the Bill of Rights. He insisted that individual freedoms should be included in the original Constitution. Many federalists opposed this, but as noted in the above post, T.Jefferson and J.Madison convinced them that citizens should have unalienable Rights to protect them from the government should it become too powerful.
 
Lol no. It really isnt. The first amendment violates plenty of commandments alone. Flynn is psychotic and totally unfit to be a general. Wheres Marshal when ya need him?
 
No.

James Madison proposed the U.S. Bill of Rights. It largely responded to the Constitution's influential opponents, including prominent Founding Fathers, who argued that the Constitution should not be ratified because it failed to protect the basic principles of human liberty. The U.S. Bill of Rights was influenced by George Mason's 1776 Virginia Declaration of Rights, the 1689 English Bill of Rights, works of the Age of Enlightenment pertaining to natural rights, and earlier English political documents such as the Magna Carta (1215).
 
No such thing as the Bill of Rights to paraphrase George Carlin. It is a Bill of Temporary Privileges. They ain't rights if the government can take them away.
  • Japanese Americans 1942
  • Civil Asset Forfeiture without due process
  • Infringing gun ownership
  • Public photography (they can watch you 24/7 for months without a warrant but just try to watch them back for 10 minutes ...)
  • Freedom of Religion violations
    • IRS is allowed to determine whether a religion is 'real' for tax purposes.
    • Some religions allow more than 1 wife but most states do not allow this.
    • churches receive automatic charity status without demonstrating they act charitiably (good question: do non-christian churches receive the same automatic status?)
 
First Amendment: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.
VERSUS
First Commandment: Do not have any other gods before me.


Second Commandment: You shall not make for yourself an idol, whether in the form of anything that is in heaven above, or that is on the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth. You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I the Lord your God am a jealous God, punishing children for the iniquity of parents, to the third and the fourth generation of those who reject me, but showing steadfast love to the thousandth generation of those who love me and keep my commandments.


Third Commandment: You shall not make wrongful use of the name of the Lord your God, for the Lord will not acquit anyone who misuses his name.


Fourth Commandment: Remember the Sabbath day and keep it holy. For six days you shall labour and do all your work. But the seventh day is a Sabbath to the Lord your God; you shall not do any work — you, your son or your daughter, your male or female slave, your livestock, or the alien resident in your towns. For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, but rested the seventh day; therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and consecrated it.
Emphasis mine:
The First Amendment protects freedom of speech and freedom of religion. The first four Commandments are all about establishing religion and curtailing speech.
 
No such thing as the Bill of Rights to paraphrase George Carlin. It is a Bill of Temporary Privileges. They ain't rights if the government can take them away.
  • Japanese Americans 1942
  • Civil Asset Forfeiture without due process
  • Infringing gun ownership
  • Public photography (they can watch you 24/7 for months without a warrant but just try to watch them back for 10 minutes ...)
  • Freedom of Religion violations
    • IRS is allowed to determine whether a religion is 'real' for tax purposes.
    • Some religions allow more than 1 wife but most states do not allow this.
    • churches receive automatic charity status without demonstrating they act charitiably (good question: do non-christian churches receive the same automatic status?)
What rights can't be taken away?
 
The Bill of Rights was inspired largely by three existing documents - - the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights [1689], and the Massachusetts Body of Liberties [1641].

Virginia delegate George Mason had a lot to with establishing the Bill of Rights. He insisted that individual freedoms should be included in the original Constitution. Many federalists opposed this, but as noted in the above post, T.Jefferson and J.Madison convinced them that citizens should have unalienable Rights to protect them from the government should it become too powerful.
Curious if Mason is even mentioned in school today.
 
No, nothing in the Constitution is based on The 10 commandments or the bible in general. It is a secular document based on the Magna Carta and the principles of enlightenment.
 
I would hope not

The ten commandments of the Bible promote misogyny, thought crime and god worship

So you can't have craven images, but you can rape and own slaves....Hmmmm
 
Retired general and conspiracy theorist Michael Flynn spoke at a campaign rally this past Saturday for MAGA pastor Jackson Lahmeyer who is running against fellow Republican, Sen. James Lankford. During his rather incoherent speech, I guess he learned from Donnie, that America needs to get back to the Christianity that the nation was founded upon. After stating that the word "Creator" may be read four times in the Constitution, he also said the following:


If the Bill of Rights isn't based on the Ten Commandments, what is the origin of those enumerated rights?

In case you don't know, the word "Creator" is not in the Constitution nor is the word "God".
No
 
No such thing as the Bill of Rights to paraphrase George Carlin. It is a Bill of Temporary Privileges. They ain't rights if the government can take them away.
  • Japanese Americans 1942
  • Civil Asset Forfeiture without due process
  • Infringing gun ownership
  • Public photography (they can watch you 24/7 for months without a warrant but just try to watch them back for 10 minutes ...)
  • Freedom of Religion violations
    • IRS is allowed to determine whether a religion is 'real' for tax purposes.
    • Some religions allow more than 1 wife but most states do not allow this.
    • churches receive automatic charity status without demonstrating they act charitiably (good question: do non-christian churches receive the same automatic status?)
Your statement is just silly. Crime, trial, conviction, punishment. No government role in that process?
 
I assume you are voting against the proposition that the Bill of Rights is based on the Ten Commandments, a sentiment with which I agree.
I just answered the OP question, imo there is no need for further thought on this thread.
 
Retired general and conspiracy theorist Michael Flynn spoke at a campaign rally this past Saturday for MAGA pastor Jackson Lahmeyer who is running against fellow Republican, Sen. James Lankford. During his rather incoherent speech, I guess he learned from Donnie, that America needs to get back to the Christianity that the nation was founded upon. After stating that the word "Creator" may be read four times in the Constitution, he also said the following:


If the Bill of Rights isn't based on the Ten Commandments, what is the origin of those enumerated rights?

In case you don't know, the word "Creator" is not in the Constitution nor is the word "God".
The Bill of Rights had absolutely nothing to do with the Ten Commandments.

The First Amendment originates primarily from Thomas Jefferson's "Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom" adopted by the Virginia Commonwealth in 1786.

The Second Amendment was written primarily by George Mason.

The biggest influence on the Bill of Rights comes from the Magna Carta that was signed in 1215. The Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments can all trace their origin to the Magna Carta.
 
No such thing as the Bill of Rights to paraphrase George Carlin. It is a Bill of Temporary Privileges. They ain't rights if the government can take them away.
  • Japanese Americans 1942
  • Civil Asset Forfeiture without due process
  • Infringing gun ownership
  • Public photography (they can watch you 24/7 for months without a warrant but just try to watch them back for 10 minutes ...)
  • Freedom of Religion violations
    • IRS is allowed to determine whether a religion is 'real' for tax purposes.
    • Some religions allow more than 1 wife but most states do not allow this.
    • churches receive automatic charity status without demonstrating they act charitiably (good question: do non-christian churches receive the same automatic status?)
Carlin was a comedian, and completely clueless with regard to rights.

Rights can be taken away by government, but only through due process of law. If government attempts to take away rights using any other means, then they are the criminals. Like Biden's illegal mask mandate, that violates the liberty of every American. That is a criminal act. One which he will be impeached for after this November's election.

FDR is another fine example a fascist leftist piece of shit who deliberately violated due process to infringe on the rights of every American. Everything you mentioned is both a Democrat mainstay (because they created it) and also criminal. Are you beginning to see the pattern here?

Eliminate Democrats and we won't have a problem with government infringing on our individual rights. It is Democrats who are the problem.
 
Retired general and conspiracy theorist Michael Flynn spoke at a campaign rally this past Saturday for MAGA pastor Jackson Lahmeyer who is running against fellow Republican, Sen. James Lankford. During his rather incoherent speech, I guess he learned from Donnie, that America needs to get back to the Christianity that the nation was founded upon. After stating that the word "Creator" may be read four times in the Constitution, he also said the following:


If the Bill of Rights isn't based on the Ten Commandments, what is the origin of those enumerated rights?

In case you don't know, the word "Creator" is not in the Constitution nor is the word "God".

The sources for the BOR isn’t some esoteric or arcane knowledge. A principal source was the Magna Charta. Another source was Natural Law Rights and Liberties, primarily a Lockean notion of natural liberty. The English statute of 1350 first making reference to “due process of law.” The English Bill of Rights in 1689, various state constitutions’ recognition of rights, the common law expounding these sources, other decisions by the English courts, and the writings of famed jurists such as Sir Edward Coke, Blackstone, and others.
 
Retired general and conspiracy theorist Michael Flynn spoke at a campaign rally this past Saturday for MAGA pastor Jackson Lahmeyer who is running against fellow Republican, Sen. James Lankford. During his rather incoherent speech, I guess he learned from Donnie, that America needs to get back to the Christianity that the nation was founded upon. After stating that the word "Creator" may be read four times in the Constitution, he also said the following:


If the Bill of Rights isn't based on the Ten Commandments, what is the origin of those enumerated rights?

In case you don't know, the word "Creator" is not in the Constitution nor is the word "God".

This is obvious shit.

Nothing in the ten commandments says anything about jury trials, the rights of the accused, quartering of troops in private houses, delineation of federal vs state power, etc.
 
The sources for the BOR isn’t some esoteric or arcane knowledge. A principal source was the Magna Charta. Another source was Natural Law Rights and Liberties, primarily a Lockean notion of natural liberty. The English statute of 1350 first making reference to “due process of law.” The English Bill of Rights in 1689, various state constitutions’ recognition of rights, the common law expounding these sources, other decisions by the English courts, and the writings of famed jurists such as Sir Edward Coke, Blackstone, and others.

Where can I find these "Natural Law" rights ?
 

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