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Is it fair to call Republicans "The Party of Lincoln"?

Is it fair to call Republicans "The Party of Lincoln?"

  • Yes, Lincoln's policies were ideologically equivalent to the modern GOP's

    Votes: 5 20.0%
  • No, Lincoln's policies were not consistent to the modern GOP's

    Votes: 20 80.0%

  • Total voters
    25

aberrant85

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The GOP has often been called "The Party of Lincoln." It's true that the first Republican president was Abraham Lincoln.

But the implication is that the party is politically aligned with how Lincoln was. Do you think that that is a true description?
 

Redress

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The GOP has often been called "The Party of Lincoln." It's true that the first Republican president was Abraham Lincoln.

But the implication is that the party is politically aligned with how Lincoln was. Do you think that that is a true description?
I think that you are reading far too much into "The Party of Lincoln". He was the first majorly successful republican, so there is nothing wrong with referring to the republican party as "The Party of Lincoln".
 

Navy Pride

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The GOP has often been called "The Party of Lincoln." It's true that the first Republican president was Abraham Lincoln.

But the implication is that the party is politically aligned with how Lincoln was. Do you think that that is a true description?
Lincoln was a Republican!!!
 

Fisher

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Lincoln was a whig, a republican, and finally a member of the National Union Party or something like that in his last election.
 

Linc

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Lincoln left the "Radical Repubs" in 1864 and formed his National Union Party. Then he was murdered. The time-line was changed.

Radical Repubs took over the party and what ensued was the genocide of Native Americans and the trashing of the South.
 

hallam

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1. That the history of the nation during the last four years has fully established the propriety and necessity of the organization and perpetuation of the republican party, and that the causes which called it into existence are permanent in their nature, and now more than ever before demand its peaceful and constitutional triumph.

2. That the maintenance of the principles promulgated in the Declaration of Independence and embodied in the Federal Constitution, "That all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; that to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed," is essential to the preservation of our Republican institutions; and that the Federal Constitution, the rights of the states, and the Union of the states, must and shall be preserved.

3. That to the Union of the States this nation owes its unprecedented increase in population; its surprising development of material resources; its rapid augmentation of wealth; its happiness at home and its honor abroad; and we hold in abhorrence all schemes for disunion, come from whatever source they may; and we congratulate the country that no republican member of congress has uttered or countenanced the threats of disunion so often made by democratic members, without rebuke and with applause from their political associates; and we denounce those threats of disunion, in case of a popular overthrow of their ascendancy, as denying the vital principles of a free government, and as an avowal of contemplated treason, which it is the imperative duty of an indignant people sternly to rebuke and forever silence.

4. That the maintenance inviolate of the rights of the states, and especially the right of each state, to order and control its own domestic institutions according to its own judgment exclusively, is essential to that balance of power on which the perfection and endurance of our political fabric depends, and we denounce the lawless invasion by armed force of the soil of any state or territory, no matter under what pretext, as among the gravest of crimes.

5. That the present Democratic Administration has far exceeded our worst apprehension in its measureless subserviency to the exactions of a sectional interest, as is especially evident in its desperate exertions to force the infamous Lecompton constitution upon the protesting people of Kansas - in construing the personal relation between master and servant to involve an unqualified property in persons - in its attempted enforcement everywhere, on land and sea, through the intervention of congress and of the federal courts, of the extreme pretensions of a purely local interest, and in its general and unvarying abuse of the power entrusted to it by a confiding people.

6. That the people justly view with alarm the reckless extravagance which pervades every department of the Federal Government; that a return to rigid economy and accountability is indispensable to arrest the systematic plunder of the public treasury by favored partisans; while the recent startling developments of frauds and corruptions at the federal metropolis, show that an entire change of Administration is imperatively demanded.

7. That the new dogma that the Constitution of its own force carries slavery into any or all of the territories of the United States, is a dangerous political heresy, at variance with the explicit provisions of that instrument itself, with cotemporaneous exposition, and with legislative and judicial precedent, is revolutionary in its tendency and subversive of the peace and harmony of the country.

8. That the normal condition of all the territory of the United States is that of freedom; that as our republican fathers, when they had abolished slavery in all our national territory, ordained that no "person should be deprived of life, liberty or property, without due process of law," it becomes our duty, by legislation, whenever such legislation is necessary, to maintain this provision of the constitution against all attempts to violate it; and we deny the authority of congress, of a territorial legislature, or of any individuals, to give legal existence to slavery in any territory of the United States.

9. That we brand the recent re-opening of the African Slave Trade, under the cover of our national flag, aided by perversions of judicial power, as a crime against humanity, and a burning shame to our country and age, and we call upon congress to take prompt and efficient measures for the total and final suppression of that execrable traffic.

10. That in the recent vetoes by the federal governors of the acts of the Legislatures of Kansas and Nebraska, prohibiting slavery in those territories, we find a practical illustration of the boasted democratic principle of non- intervention and popular sovereignty, embodied in the Kansas-Nebraska bill, and a demonstration of the deception and fraud involved therein.

11. That Kansas should of right be immediately admitted as a state, under the constitution recently formed and adopted by her people, and accepted by the House of Representatives.

12. That while providing revenue for the support of the general government by duties upon imports, sound policy requires such an adjustment of these imposts as to encourage the development of the industrial interests of the whole country, and we commend that policy of national exchanges which secures to the workingmen liberal wages, to agriculture remunerating prices, to mechanics and manufacturers an adequate reward for their skill, labor and enterprise, and to the nation commercial prosperity and independence.

13. That we protest against any sale or alienation to others of the public lands held by actual settlers, and against any view of the free homestead policy which regards the settlers as paupers or suppliants for public bounty, and we demand the passage by congress of the complete and satisfactory homestead measure which has already passed the house.

14. That the Republican Party is opposed to any change in our naturalization laws, or any state legislation by which the rights of citizenship hitherto accorded by emigrants from foreign lands shall be abridged or impaired; and in favor of giving a full and efficient protection to the rights of all classes of citizens, whether native or naturalized, both at home and abroad.

15. That appropriation by Congress for river and Harbor improvements of a National character, required for the accommodation and security of an existing commerce, are authorized by the constitution and justified by the obligation of Government to protect the lives and property of its citizens.

16. That a railroad to the Pacific ocean is imperatively demanded by the interests of the whole country; that the Federal Government ought to render immediate and efficient aid in its construction; and that, as preliminary thereto, a daily overland mail should be promptly established.

17. Finally, having thus set forth our distinctive principles and views, we invite the coöperation of all citizens, however differing on other questions who substantially agree with us in their affirmance and support.
This is the 1860 Republican platform. 2, 4, 6, 13, and 15 would be seen in a platform of Republican party today in almost the same language. 14 and 16 not so much. Its a mixed bag but if we say that Republicans wouldn't vote for slavery now, we could say that the Republican of Lincoln's day is very similar to the Republicans of day.
 

Grendel

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The GOP has often been called "The Party of Lincoln." It's true that the first Republican president was Abraham Lincoln.

But the implication is that the party is politically aligned with how Lincoln was. Do you think that that is a true description?
They can call it that if they want, but they're not fooling anyone except fools. It would be like calling the Democrats "The party of Thomas Jefferson". Time has passed. The GOP isn't the party of Lincoln. It's the party of George Bush and Sarah Palin, Mitt Romney and Michelle Bachman. It's the party of Rush Limbaugh and Fox News. It was the party of Lincoln, but that was a few generations ago.
 

Cameron

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The Republican ideology is more closely identified with the "states' rights" platform, which was embraced by the South in fighting the civil war against Lincoln. IMO.
 

Artevelde

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The GOP has often been called "The Party of Lincoln." It's true that the first Republican president was Abraham Lincoln.

But the implication is that the party is politically aligned with how Lincoln was. Do you think that that is a true description?
Do you think the current Democratic Party is aligned with how FDR was?
 

Smeagol

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I'm learning a lot from this thread.

Being as honest as I can, the driving force behind the GOP in Lincoln's day was standing up to the slavery industry in the face of criticisms that its not the place of government to tell private business owners how to operate, opposing states rights and doing the right thing aka values or social conservatism. You guys are making me really ponder on this one but I'm actually starting to wonder now if the GOP of today more closely mirrors the GOP under Lincoln or the Confederacy Davis.

I just wrote up a list of similarities and differences between today's GOP and Lincoln's GOP as well as today's GOP and the Confederacy. I decided to delete it. No need make people who happen to be emotional invested in their political tribalism get defensive.
 

Thom Paine

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I'm learning a lot from this thread.

I just wrote up a list of similarities and differences between today's GOP and Lincoln's GOP as well as today's GOP and the Confederacy. I decided to delete it. No need make people who happen to be emotional invested in their political tribalism get defensive.
Damn the torpedos, it may be a worthy discussion if everyone remains civil. .... Hmmm, you're probably correct; It maybe too much to ask. :(:peace
 

Smeagol

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Damn the torpedos, it may be a worthy discussion if everyone remains civil. .... Hmmm, you're probably correct; It maybe too much to ask. :(:peace
Go ahead and start a thread. I don't want people jumping all over me.
 

aberrant85

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Do you think the current Democratic Party is aligned with how FDR was?
Interesting question. Although Democrats don't use "The Party of FDR" as a shorthand for the party, he is still the most revered figure from the party.

Still, I think the Democratic party is a lot less liberal since FDR's time. FDR was way more focused on the poor, whereas modern Democrats have accepted the political difficulty of focusing on them and instead focus on the Middle Class and class mobility. In 1944 the top tax income rate was set at 94%. Democrats want to tax the rich higher, but not by that much. FDR created a huge amount of government spending to work on the country's infrastructure, support the arts, and put people back to work. While Democrats support these goals today, they are obstructed by the huge national debt that already exists, preventing us from spending our way out of the slow recovery.

I'd say that modern Democrats are ideologically aligned with FDR, but only up to a point, and they give way to pragmatism most of the time.
 

Fiddytree

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Hard to answer that question, as many things have evolved or changed. Then you have to be aware that the Radical Republicans were a breed all their own in comparison with those old Whigs.
 

Gipper

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A ruthless warmonger that suspended habeas corpus? Yeah, he could be a Republican today.
 

Captain America

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In time, or perhaps, in the near future, the GOP will certainly be the party of Lincoln in one way I can think of.

Dead.
 

disneydude

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The Republican party today is soooooooo radically different from the things that Lincoln stood for that it is a disgrace for them to claim that. I did notice at the last convention, as opposed to the dozens before it...they hardly made the reference.
 

Thom Paine

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Go ahead and start a thread. I don't want people jumping all over me.

I believe you to be correct... while some subjects seem to invite 'snark' others deserve a reasonable, eventho contentious, discussion/debate. I wouldn't get in the kindergarten sandbox concerning the historic status of the Democratic Party... I will not do it concerning the Republican Party. It's already begun; while mild so far it no doubt will increase. I just don't do 'sandbox' well. So, as you, Ill probably sit this thread out and observe.
You offered a great question. I had hope.... Ah, well; crap in one hand; wish in the other... which one gets full first?

Have a terrific day Sir,

Thom Paine
 

Smeagol

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I believe you to be correct... while some subjects seem to invite 'snark' others deserve a reasonable, eventho contentious, discussion/debate. I wouldn't get in the kindergarten sandbox concerning the historic status of the Democratic Party... I will not do it concerning the Republican Party. It's already begun; while mild so far it no doubt will increase. I just don't do 'sandbox' well. So, as you, Ill probably sit this thread out and observe.
You offered a great question. I had hope.... Ah, well; crap in one hand; wish in the other... which one gets full first?

Have a terrific day Sir,

Thom Paine
I'm a Republican myself. I just think Obama made us get a little crazy if you want my opinion. Why that is, I don't know but the biggest impactor on the culture of the Republican party in recent history has been Barack Obama. I've never seen anything like it and certainly nothing I ever expected. He single handedly caused a good portion to lose their ever-loving-minds without even trying and it started before he was even elected.
 

aberrant85

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I'm a Republican myself. I just think Obama made us get a little crazy if you want my opinion. Why that is, I don't know but the biggest impactor on the culture of the Republican party in recent history has been Barack Obama. I've never seen anything like it and certainly nothing I ever expected. He single handedly caused a good portion to lose their ever-loving-minds without even trying and it started before he was even elected.
How much is racism a factor? Not saying every Republican is a racist, or that some Democrats aren't. Just a lot of Dixiecrats became Southern Republicans.
 

Surtr

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The GOP has often been called "The Party of Lincoln." It's true that the first Republican president was Abraham Lincoln.

But the implication is that the party is politically aligned with how Lincoln was. Do you think that that is a true description?
Lincoln is dead, along with what his party was. Same with the Democrats, and any other party that claims historical backing.
 

Smeagol

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How much is racism a factor? Not saying every Republican is a racist, or that some Democrats aren't. Just a lot of Dixiecrats became Southern Republicans.
I think some of it is racially motivated animosity. I've seen youtube clips where people admit they don't like him because of his ethnicity. I try to defend people's right to disagree with a black leader on the issues and not be labeled a racist for it but I have difficulty reconciling the level of emotion in the animosity over supposed issues they had little to no problems with when other leaders did the same things either first or to a greater degree. Nevertheless I still think racially motivated negative attitudes toward him are in the minority. Most who hold him to a double standard I think are just going along with the team and have surrendered their passions and reasoning to the sense of security they get from agreeing with their favorite political pundit(s).

I cannot end this be not agreeing further with you that racial divisiveness goes both ways. I do think there are some black leaders on the left who specialize not in making America more united but more divided along racial lines. Everything bad that happens isn't because of racism. One of the things that infuriated me in the Bush years was when some people labeled him a racist. Bush likes and has done more for black people than most black people for crying out loud. I'm black and my pastor is white. Bush's pastor (unless he's changed churches) is black. Millions is not tens of millions of Africans with HIV will live long lives because of his foreign policy initiatives that got anti-viral medications to people in Africa would could not afford them. Most Americans on either side of the political divide don't even care about race other than to admire the cultural contributions different ethnic groups have made on the larger American culture. For example, today my white boss treated me to lunch at a higher end (relatively speaking) soul food restaurant we'd both been meaning to visit. Initially thinking he'd be the only white person there, he was pleasantly surprised at the number of white patrons there and couldn't stop talking about how good the food was. American rock and pop music wouldn't be what it is today without the influences of American R&B and so on and we all can appreciate each other's different contributions.
 

aberrant85

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I cannot end this be not agreeing further with you that racial divisiveness goes both ways.
I'm glad you agree it's a problem. I sympathize with the average Republican who are embarrassed by the representatives of their party that make the most offensive statements. Still, I think rational representatives have to shame their peers when they make outrageous statements. I've seen more examples of these call-outs recently, but for a while there the silence was thunderous.
 
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