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Is Canada Hostile Or Friendly To Small Town Life?

SDET

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Things that are hostile to small town life are: High fuel prices, poor roads, environmental restrictions that prevent building and farming, restricting access to visit wilderness. Things that are small town friendly: Good internet service, A decent hospital and clinic, jobs, quality housing. I am sure there are more, but these are the ones that stand out. In my visits to Canada, I was particularly impressed by all the obvious economic activity along the Trans-Labrador Highway, particularly between Labrador City and Happy Valley. Just by talking to a few people, many Labradorians believe they are being ripped off by Quebec. Labrador produces lots of electricity for Quebec, and there appears to be a "if you're selling to us there needs to be a mandated discount and if you're buy something from us we expect a premium" mentality. On this board, I see this "you Americans" or "you Canadians" discussion. However, I believe I have more in common with someone who lives in Swift Current, SK, Portage La Prairie, MB, or Happy Valley, NL than someone in Los Angeles, Chicago, DC, or Seattle.

As a comparison, small towns in the US serve as a "safety net" for retirees. They are places where someone can afford to live on Social Security alone. To illustrate this, look up the housing rental prices in Bonham, TX, Keokuk, IA and Cookeville, TN.
 
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joG

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Things that are hostile to small town life are: High fuel prices, poor roads, environmental restrictions that prevent building and farming, restricting access to visit wilderness. Things that are small town friendly: Good internet service, A decent hospital and clinic, jobs, quality housing. I am sure there are more, but these are the ones that stand out. In my visits to Canada, I was particularly impressed by all the obvious economic activity along the Trans-Labrador Highway, particularly between Labrador City and Happy Valley. Just by talking to a few people, many Labradorians believe they are being ripped off by Quebec. Labrador produces lots of electricity for Quebec, and there appears to be a "if you're selling to us there needs to be a mandated discount and if you're buy something from us we expect a premium" mentality. On this board, I see this "you Americans" or "you Canadians" discussion. However, I believe I have more in common with someone who lives in Swift Current, SK, Portage La Prairie, MB, or Happy Valley, NL than someone in Los Angeles, Chicago, DC, or Seattle.

As a comparison, small towns in the US serve as a "safety net" for retirees. They are places where someone can afford to live on Social Security alone. To illustrate this, look up the housing rental prices in Bonham, TX, Keokuk, IA and Cookeville, TN.

Just wait and see how friendly to country life countries are, when they have gone carbon neutral, unless the technology improves enormously.
 

Grand Mal

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Things that are hostile to small town life are: High fuel prices, poor roads, environmental restrictions that prevent building and farming, restricting access to visit wilderness. Things that are small town friendly: Good internet service, A decent hospital and clinic, jobs, quality housing. I am sure there are more, but these are the ones that stand out. In my visits to Canada, I was particularly impressed by all the obvious economic activity along the Trans-Labrador Highway, particularly between Labrador City and Happy Valley. Just by talking to a few people, many Labradorians believe they are being ripped off by Quebec. Labrador produces lots of electricity for Quebec, and there appears to be a "if you're selling to us there needs to be a mandated discount and if you're buy something from us we expect a premium" mentality. On this board, I see this "you Americans" or "you Canadians" discussion. However, I believe I have more in common with someone who lives in Swift Current, SK, Portage La Prairie, MB, or Happy Valley, NL than someone in Los Angeles, Chicago, DC, or Seattle.

As a comparison, small towns in the US serve as a "safety net" for retirees. They are places where someone can afford to live on Social Security alone. To illustrate this, look up the housing rental prices in Bonham, TX, Keokuk, IA and Cookeville, TN.

Better spend a winter on the Prairies or in Labrador before you decide.
There's a song in French, "Mon pays ce n'est pas un pays, c'est l'hiver!" "My country isn't a country, it's the winter!" In a nutshell, it means winter is where we live.

But move on up! We have lots of room. All we ask of our American friends is that you don't shoot anyone and don't yodel when you sing.
 

SDET

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Better spend a winter on the Prairies or in Labrador before you decide.
There's a song in French, "Mon pays ce n'est pas un pays, c'est l'hiver!" "My country isn't a country, it's the winter!" In a nutshell, it means winter is where we live.

But move on up! We have lots of room. All we ask of our American friends is that you don't shoot anyone and don't yodel when you sing.

I already celebrated New Years with some friends in Manitoba and enjoyed Winter Carnival in Quebec City. I hope to drive the Trans-Labrador in Winter, but my wife got "cold feet" when she saw this photo. She is from Brazil and was shocked how Quebeckers just ignore Winter and pretend the cold isn't there.

LAB-SNOW11.jpg
 

Lord Tammerlain

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Things that are hostile to small town life are: High fuel prices, poor roads, environmental restrictions that prevent building and farming, restricting access to visit wilderness. Things that are small town friendly: Good internet service, A decent hospital and clinic, jobs, quality housing. I am sure there are more, but these are the ones that stand out. In my visits to Canada, I was particularly impressed by all the obvious economic activity along the Trans-Labrador Highway, particularly between Labrador City and Happy Valley. Just by talking to a few people, many Labradorians believe they are being ripped off by Quebec. Labrador produces lots of electricity for Quebec, and there appears to be a "if you're selling to us there needs to be a mandated discount and if you're buy something from us we expect a premium" mentality. On this board, I see this "you Americans" or "you Canadians" discussion. However, I believe I have more in common with someone who lives in Swift Current, SK, Portage La Prairie, MB, or Happy Valley, NL than someone in Los Angeles, Chicago, DC, or Seattle.

As a comparison, small towns in the US serve as a "safety net" for retirees. They are places where someone can afford to live on Social Security alone. To illustrate this, look up the housing rental prices in Bonham, TX, Keokuk, IA and Cookeville, TN.

Small town Alberta is fine.

Don't expect the roads to be sanded in the winter (for places of around 300) and expect a 40 min drive or more to a major shopping area ( walmart etc). The peoplease are going to be friendly at least the older people (older then gen x) and more religious then the cities. Outside of a Chinese restaurant don't expect to see minorities other then natives. The houses are much cheaper then the cities
 

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Given the size of Canada, And the number of people in the entire country, I would imaging there are tons of "Small Cities" that are a considerable commute to a larger metropolis, "Small Cities in the USA are more likely to be nearer to a large metropolis.. I myself live about 12 miles from the "Big City".

I have only been to Vancouver myself,, Loved the beauty, But it was just another big city

djl
 
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