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How I got my LDL to 118

JacksinPA

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When it comes to cholesterol & atherosclerotic plaque clogging your arteries, you don't want to fool around. I spent the last 40 years chasing my cholesterol & as a result got the news from a July echocardiogram that I had an aortic stenosis. Briefly, that is cholesterol working its way up your aorta (your big main artery) towards your heart. If that is allowed to progress you're looking at surgery to replace that valve in your heart.

Two months ago I was sent to a cardiologist who put me on an old cholesterol drug called Zetia (exetimbe). See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ezetimibe. None of the physicians I'd been seeing for the past 40 years ever mentioned this drug, which inhibits the absorption of cholesterol in your small intestine. I got a call today that my LDL (low density lipoprotein) number was now down to 118 & that my stenosis was unchanged since July per a recent repeat echocardiogram. (I take Lipitor also, 60 mg/day, along with 10 mg of the Zetia.)

'Good' LDL numbers are below 130. Above 130, I suggest you get your affairs in order.

If anyone reading this has cholesterol problems I hope you're either on Zetia or plan to make an appointment with your doctor because this stuff worked for me & likely will work for you. It's generic & inexpensive.
 

Bum

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When it comes to cholesterol & atherosclerotic plaque clogging your arteries, you don't want to fool around. I spent the last 40 years chasing my cholesterol & as a result got the news from a July echocardiogram that I had an aortic stenosis. Briefly, that is cholesterol working its way up your aorta (your big main artery) towards your heart. If that is allowed to progress you're looking at surgery to replace that valve in your heart.

Two months ago I was sent to a cardiologist who put me on an old cholesterol drug called Zetia (exetimbe). See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ezetimibe. None of the physicians I'd been seeing for the past 40 years ever mentioned this drug, which inhibits the absorption of cholesterol in your small intestine. I got a call today that my LDL (low density lipoprotein) number was now down to 118 & that my stenosis was unchanged since July per a recent repeat echocardiogram. (I take Lipitor also, 60 mg/day, along with 10 mg of the Zetia.)

'Good' LDL numbers are below 130. Above 130, I suggest you get your affairs in order.

If anyone reading this has cholesterol problems I hope you're either on Zetia or plan to make an appointment with your doctor because this stuff worked for me & likely will work for you. It's generic & inexpensive.

I was fortunate enough to have a dietician speak to me before going onto medication...besides diet modification, she advised use of niacin once a day, and large amounts of soluble fiber just prior to each meal.

The soluble fiber served to absorb lipids from the consumed food, and had the added benefit of making me feel fuller ( hellooo happy weight loss)..think of it like one of those little sponge animals you put in water and watch them expand to several times thier original size.

The other benefit was it slowed the release of sugar into the blood stream....this did wonders for my A1C.
 

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I was fortunate enough to have a dietician speak to me before going onto medication...besides diet modification, she advised use of niacin once a day, and large amounts of soluble fiber just prior to each meal.

The soluble fiber served to absorb lipids from the consumed food, and had the added benefit of making me feel fuller ( hellooo happy weight loss)..think of it like one of those little sponge animals you put in water and watch them expand to several times thier original size.

The other benefit was it slowed the release of sugar into the blood stream....this did wonders for my A1C.

Wait a minute, I've seen your pictures, Bum.
At first glance, I assumed you were some kind of super-human Special Forces guy with the health profile of some kind of genetically engineered ubermensch. In short, you looked like you had zero health issues.

So you're saying that even you are at risk, with all the physical training and exercise that you do?
Crikey, that doesn't give me much hope in my declining years!
 

Bum

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Wait a minute, I've seen your pictures, Bum.
At first glance, I assumed you were some kind of super-human Special Forces guy with the health profile of some kind of genetically engineered ubermensch. In short, you looked like you had zero health issues.

So you're saying that even you are at risk, with all the physical training and exercise that you do?
Crikey, that doesn't give me much hope in my declining years!

:mrgreen:

Even us "ubermensch" have to deal with the occasional genetic snafu......yes, it runs in the family, but unlike my parents and grandparents, I am compliant with my treatment ( hard not to be with a nurse for a wife and nearly 35 years in the medical field).


While I consider myself healthy for my age ( 52 next month) I do not take it for granted...good genetics will only get me so far; the rest is up to me to care for myself so I can live long enough to be a burden and embarrassment to my children.

;)
 

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Even us "ubermensch" have to deal with the occasional genetic snafu......yes, it runs in the family, but unlike my parents and grandparents, I am compliant with my treatment ( hard not to be with a nurse for a wife and nearly 35 years in the medical field).

While I consider myself healthy for my age ( 52 next month) I do not take it for granted...good genetics will only get me so far; the rest is up to me to care for myself so I can live long enough to be a burden and embarrassment to my children.;)

Conceptually, your heart is in the right place, and while generally what you say effects the majority of atherosclerosis and heart patients, it is not universal. Each individual must be viewed as unique, often with similar symptoms indicating similar underlying issues. However as you point out, no one's health status should be taken for granted, and preferable multigenerational examination can lead to better individual therapy. Were life so easy, in a culture where that information is often not available or recognizable. For some the same or similar atherosclerosis symptoms translate as strokes rather than heart disease, if not even other blood delivery related problems, or both, or many. Different maladies caused by the same underlying issues. Sometimes genetically related, sometimes, not, and at times unique in manifestation and timing for delivery.

At age 41, following a physical regimen inclusive of minimum daily runs of 10-20 miles, an hour of tennis or handball, a minimum of two hours free weights, 90 minutes of formal martial arts 3 times weekly, swimming, a record of annual medicals displaying slightly low blood pressure, approximately three weeks after being kicked in the chest by a horse one morning (my own fault, not the horse's) I enjoyed a massive coronary infarction. Tests showed loss of more than 80% of my heart, precluding surgery. We theoretically need 25% of our heart muscle to survive. The prognosis, death. I was sent home two weeks later to die peacefully and with dignity, surrounded by family and loved ones. 12 weeks later, (the first attack was symptomized by no pain, acute weakness and prolific perspiration) with massive chest pain, I was given enormous amounts of morphine, prepped for heart surgery in a Class A hospital with one of the top cardiac surgeons in the country. My own cardiologist from the same hospital, then a young kid, with a mere 10 years of experience, was intrigued by what he was seeing. So was the surgeon when he opened my chest. My BP was 72 over 40. I should have been dead. Three valves showed massive long term deterioration, 1 completely ruptured, and 4 major arteries of the heart near total collapse because of the valve problems. He had already catheterized my heart, placing a balloon mechanism inside two chambers to keep my heart beating, a week prior to the surgery.

The valves were replaced, I enjoyed 4 arterial grafts from veins harvested from my legs (which regrow). I would have suffered a much more severe cardiac event had that horse not kicked me in the chest, within a matter of weeks. That tough old dumb stallion saved my life. My wife said having our fourth was fun way of proving I was well.

continued
 

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My BP has been on the low side ever since, barely 95/60. I was told the grafts were good for 5-20 years. I do have congestive heart failure and 12 years ago was given a pacemaker/defrib device to service my aorta. Eight months after the initial surgery I was diagnosed as an unknown Type 1 diabetic, naturally doing all that exercise to control my blood sugars, making it almost impossible to diagnose the diabetes until I enjoyed a 6 month vacation from my physical regimen. Since then, I have been on lipitor, atavastin, to control arterial plaque from excess blood sugars, a careful diet and a moderate (for me) exercise regimen. A few years ago I collapsed from a new arrhythmia, brought back into sync with medication. Now a few weeks ago, after an edema episode when I gained 70 lbs over two months, 36 lbs during the last two weeks with no apparent change in diet, commonly known as water on the ankles. And suffering edema blisters, one on each shin, each the size of an orange, and extremely painful, followed by a 10 day hospital stay during which I lost 66 pounds of fluid. My normal weight throughout my adult life has varied between 185-210 lbs, usually about 190 at 6'. The fluid weight gain was caused by the aortic chambers no longer being in sync with the ventricular chambers. The excess fluid not only effecting my legs, but putting pressure on my heart bringing me close to a final heart attack. As soon as all evidence shows the edema is under control, my weight normalized, I get a new pacemaker/defrlb unit which will sync all 4 chambers of my heart. This means, if I die as I predicted, getting hit in the head by a toilet seat falling from the sky my heart will keep beating. I expect the next surgery, the new unit, within the next two weeks, in and out within 36 hours. I'm 69, and I'd chase more women if I could remember what to do with them.

I've spent my borrowed time raising my family, building my version of business empires, and leading a philanthropic life. My first wife has since passed, and a few years later, met another fine woman and married her, so entertaining her since my retirement almost three years ago balances out the pleasures I enjoy with my grandchildren and such, along with my philanthropic efforts of which she takes part.

None of what I've said is intended to negate anything you said. It is meant to amplify your own advice about working with competent and open minded doctors to learn what is best for each patient. Your regimen may be perfect for you and many others. Then there are other possibilities.

BTW, all of this was an excuse to enjoy hospital cuisine. Worse than even Army chow. 2 days after my last hospital admission in Manhattan, the NY Post ran an article (hrumph) about zombie possums escaping Central Park and dying. I skipped the mystery meatloaf being served for dinner that evening. This ain't Alaska. You betcha. :) I want to be a burden and embarrassment to my family. A fair trade off for their years of being a burden and embarrassment to me.

Whatever, cherish every minute.
 

Elvira

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Thanks Jack, I will mention Zetia to my Dr since I cannot take statins and niacin did nothing for me after taking it for over a year faithfully...my #'s are not good...:(
 

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my LDL is below 130, but i have a pretty high HDL (100+.) it's a genetic thing. Mom is the same way. i do twice a year checkups / once a year bloodwork.
 

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My BP has been on the low side ever since, barely 95/60. I was told the grafts were good for 5-20 years. I do have congestive heart failure and 12 years ago was given a pacemaker/defrib device to service my aorta. Eight months after the initial surgery I was diagnosed as an unknown Type 1 diabetic, naturally doing all that exercise to control my blood sugars, making it almost impossible to diagnose the diabetes until I enjoyed a 6 month vacation from my physical regimen. Since then, I have been on lipitor, atavastin, to control arterial plaque from excess blood sugars, a careful diet and a moderate (for me) exercise regimen. A few years ago I collapsed from a new arrhythmia, brought back into sync with medication. Now a few weeks ago, after an edema episode when I gained 70 lbs over two months, 36 lbs during the last two weeks with no apparent change in diet, commonly known as water on the ankles. And suffering edema blisters, one on each shin, each the size of an orange, and extremely painful, followed by a 10 day hospital stay during which I lost 66 pounds of fluid. My normal weight throughout my adult life has varied between 185-210 lbs, usually about 190 at 6'. The fluid weight gain was caused by the aortic chambers no longer being in sync with the ventricular chambers. The excess fluid not only effecting my legs, but putting pressure on my heart bringing me close to a final heart attack. As soon as all evidence shows the edema is under control, my weight normalized, I get a new pacemaker/defrlb unit which will sync all 4 chambers of my heart. This means, if I die as I predicted, getting hit in the head by a toilet seat falling from the sky my heart will keep beating. I expect the next surgery, the new unit, within the next two weeks, in and out within 36 hours. I'm 69, and I'd chase more women if I could remember what to do with them.

I've spent my borrowed time raising my family, building my version of business empires, and leading a philanthropic life. My first wife has since passed, and a few years later, met another fine woman and married her, so entertaining her since my retirement almost three years ago balances out the pleasures I enjoy with my grandchildren and such, along with my philanthropic efforts of which she takes part.

None of what I've said is intended to negate anything you said. It is meant to amplify your own advice about working with competent and open minded doctors to learn what is best for each patient. Your regimen may be perfect for you and many others. Then there are other possibilities.

BTW, all of this was an excuse to enjoy hospital cuisine. Worse than even Army chow. 2 days after my last hospital admission in Manhattan, the NY Post ran an article (hrumph) about zombie possums escaping Central Park and dying. I skipped the mystery meatloaf being served for dinner that evening. This ain't Alaska. You betcha. :) I want to be a burden and embarrassment to my family. A fair trade off for their years of being a burden and embarrassment to me.

Whatever, cherish every minute.

There is no one size fits all approach to cholesterol management; I consider myself fortunate to be able to manage mine as I do.

Not everyone responds to particular interventions, and must seek a more aggressive approach.....glad you survived yours.
 

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Conceptually, your heart is in the right place, and while generally what you say effects the majority of atherosclerosis and heart patients, it is not universal. Each individual must be viewed as unique, often with similar symptoms indicating similar underlying issues. However as you point out, no one's health status should be taken for granted, and preferable multigenerational examination can lead to better individual therapy. Were life so easy, in a culture where that information is often not available or recognizable. For some the same or similar atherosclerosis symptoms translate as strokes rather than heart disease, if not even other blood delivery related problems, or both, or many. Different maladies caused by the same underlying issues. Sometimes genetically related, sometimes, not, and at times unique in manifestation and timing for delivery.

At age 41, following a physical regimen inclusive of minimum daily runs of 10-20 miles, an hour of tennis or handball, a minimum of two hours free weights, 90 minutes of formal martial arts 3 times weekly, swimming, a record of annual medicals displaying slightly low blood pressure, approximately three weeks after being kicked in the chest by a horse one morning (my own fault, not the horse's) I enjoyed a massive coronary infarction. Tests showed loss of more than 80% of my heart, precluding surgery. We theoretically need 25% of our heart muscle to survive. The prognosis, death. I was sent home two weeks later to die peacefully and with dignity, surrounded by family and loved ones. 12 weeks later, (the first attack was symptomized by no pain, acute weakness and prolific perspiration) with massive chest pain, I was given enormous amounts of morphine, prepped for heart surgery in a Class A hospital with one of the top cardiac surgeons in the country. My own cardiologist from the same hospital, then a young kid, with a mere 10 years of experience, was intrigued by what he was seeing. So was the surgeon when he opened my chest. My BP was 72 over 40. I should have been dead. Three valves showed massive long term deterioration, 1 completely ruptured, and 4 major arteries of the heart near total collapse because of the valve problems. He had already catheterized my heart, placing a balloon mechanism inside two chambers to keep my heart beating, a week prior to the surgery.

The valves were replaced, I enjoyed 4 arterial grafts from veins harvested from my legs (which regrow). I would have suffered a much more severe cardiac event had that horse not kicked me in the chest, within a matter of weeks. That tough old dumb stallion saved my life. My wife said having our fourth was fun way of proving I was well.

continued

Christ! You are one lucky mofo! Keep on whatever you are doing. Are you a transplant candidate?

BTW, can I get you to fill out my lottery ticket for me?
 

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When it comes to cholesterol & atherosclerotic plaque clogging your arteries, you don't want to fool around. I spent the last 40 years chasing my cholesterol & as a result got the news from a July echocardiogram that I had an aortic stenosis. Briefly, that is cholesterol working its way up your aorta (your big main artery) towards your heart. If that is allowed to progress you're looking at surgery to replace that valve in your heart.

Two months ago I was sent to a cardiologist who put me on an old cholesterol drug called Zetia (exetimbe). See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ezetimibe. None of the physicians I'd been seeing for the past 40 years ever mentioned this drug, which inhibits the absorption of cholesterol in your small intestine. I got a call today that my LDL (low density lipoprotein) number was now down to 118 & that my stenosis was unchanged since July per a recent repeat echocardiogram. (I take Lipitor also, 60 mg/day, along with 10 mg of the Zetia.)

'Good' LDL numbers are below 130. Above 130, I suggest you get your affairs in order.

If anyone reading this has cholesterol problems I hope you're either on Zetia or plan to make an appointment with your doctor because this stuff worked for me & likely will work for you. It's generic & inexpensive.

Hmmm.


Zetia is a drug that may provide some modest benefit, but running an LDL over 100 with documented atherosclerotic disease might still be a concern. I’m assuming you actually take 80mg of Lipitor, not 60.

You may be a good candidate for Praluent, which has much better impacts on LDL and has shown improved outcomes. Repatha is a similar drug, but with less good evidence. Vascepa is also a potential alternative with a brand new study just presented a couple weeks ago that looked impressive.

It really depends upon how high risk you are, but you might want to talk with your cardiologist.

Caveat- I really only can go with the minimal info presented- there may be many reasons these alternatives might not be better than Zetia for you.
 

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Christ! You are one lucky mofo! Keep on whatever you are doing. Are you a transplant candidate?

BTW, can I get you to fill out my lottery ticket for me?

I am very fortunate. Friendly fire is SE Asia sent me home, I was told I wouldn't walk again. 18 months later I passed the physical for the NYPD. 15 years later, I took a round in the same leg, on the job, was told to call it a day. Went on to build a major personal security company, and some other business interests. Muscle cancers removed from both legs, benign, 4 times, skin cancer three times, not benign on the chest, the forehead, and left arm, benign. Cancer history and age make me ineligible for a transplant. 16 grandkids make me not want a transplant. :) My cardiologist says I'm good for another 15 yrs or so him sucking money out of me. If I go broke, less time.

I never gamble with lotteries, better odds of losing in the stock market. I keep dreaming I play the lottery, and I keep dreaming I lose. Are sure you want me to fill out that card for you?

I'm getting ready to walk the 7 blocks back and forth to the bagel store. The wife and granddaughter are hiding under the comforter on my my bed, pretending to be asleep. I hear the giggling everytime I walk into the bedroom for something like socks. Looks like it might rain. Dog looks out the window, growls, lies down by the door, waiting, repeat and rinse. He's afraid of getting wet. I figure, an hour trip, an hour and 15 minutes last week, an hour and half the week before. He wants a bagel, so do the girls. I've got my pants on, almost my shoes. Should be a ten-fifteen minute walk with pit stops for Dog. Life is good.
 

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There is no one size fits all approach to cholesterol management; I consider myself fortunate to be able to manage mine as I do.

Not everyone responds to particular interventions, and must seek a more aggressive approach.....glad you survived yours.

I blame survival on bourbon and beer. My wife disagrees and threatens local bartenders with bodily harm, like I need a bartender. :rofl
 

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Hmmm.


Zetia is a drug that may provide some modest benefit, but running an LDL over 100 with documented atherosclerotic disease might still be a concern. I’m assuming you actually take 80mg of Lipitor, not 60.

You may be a good candidate for Praluent, which has much better impacts on LDL and has shown improved outcomes. Repatha is a similar drug, but with less good evidence. Vascepa is also a potential alternative with a brand new study just presented a couple weeks ago that looked impressive.

It really depends upon how high risk you are, but you might want to talk with your cardiologist.

Caveat- I really only can go with the minimal info presented- there may be many reasons these alternatives might not be better than Zetia for you.

Stopping the progression of the aortic stenosis was our immediate goal. The Zetia, with no other lifestyle changes, has accomplished that.

LDL levels between 100 & 130 are considered good & acceptable. 10 mg/day of Zetia has gotten me to 118 & stopped the progression of the aortic stenosis.

I take 60 mg/day of Lipitor. I had tried 80 mg/day but it gave me a constant pain in my left arm - a symptom of the degenerative muscle disease called rhabdomyelysis. At 60 + 10 of Zetia I have no pain.

Praluent & the other you mentioned are the newer biologics that are very expensive & are not covered by my Plan D insurance. Vascepa is another new biologic targeted mainly at triglycerides.
 

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Stopping the progression of the aortic stenosis was our immediate goal. The Zetia, with no other lifestyle changes, has accomplished that.

LDL levels between 100 & 130 are considered good & acceptable. 10 mg/day of Zetia has gotten me to 118 & stopped the progression of the aortic stenosis.

I take 60 mg/day of Lipitor. I had tried 80 mg/day but it gave me a constant pain in my left arm - a symptom of the degenerative muscle disease called rhabdomyelysis. At 60 + 10 of Zetia I have no pain.

Praluent & the other you mentioned are the newer biologics that are very expensive & are not covered by my Plan D insurance. Vascepa is another new biologic targeted mainly at triglycerides.

Yep. Praluent is expensive.

But it will bring your LDL down to double digits (in some people, single digits!).

Vascepa (not a biologic- a purified fish oil) was thought to be a TG drug... but it looks like it works some other way. The recent trial is a bit controversial, but it may end up as standard therapy in addition to statins.
 

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Yep. Praluent is expensive.

But it will bring your LDL down to double digits (in some people, single digits!).

Vascepa (not a biologic- a purified fish oil) was thought to be a TG drug... but it looks like it works some other way. The recent trial is a bit controversial, but it may end up as standard therapy in addition to statins.

I'm doing the best I can with what I have. I'm retired & have a fixed income so I cannot afford an additional $5-6K/year in order to fatten the profits of some big pharma company with an unknown final result.

I look at death in a philosophical way. In my early 20s I had a fall that fractured my skull & put me into a coma for a week. It was a virtual death. It was like turning off a computer. I don't even recall the experience.
 

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I'm doing the best I can with what I have. I'm retired & have a fixed income so I cannot afford an additional $5-6K/year in order to fatten the profits of some big pharma company with an unknown final result.

I look at death in a philosophical way. In my early 20s I had a fall that fractured my skull & put me into a coma for a week. It was a virtual death. It was like turning off a computer. I don't even recall the experience.

Well... it’s not really an unknown final result, although realistically, your condition is 100% fatal.... because even people with the cleanest coronaries die eventually.

The outcome studies of Praluent is fairly good. Vascepa looks pretty good too, at a much more reasonable price. And if you have commercial rx coverage (some do on Medicare via union plans or pensions)) you can get these drugs for $10-20/mo with discount cards.

Just letting you know the current data with lipid drugs. This Vascepa thing is very interesting. Impressive results with a really unclear mechanism.

NEJM - Error
 

JacksinPA

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Well... it’s not really an unknown final result, although realistically, your condition is 100% fatal.... because even people with the cleanest coronaries die eventually.

The outcome studies of Praluent is fairly good. Vascepa looks pretty good too, at a much more reasonable price. And if you have commercial rx coverage (some do on Medicare via union plans or pensions)) you can get these drugs for $10-20/mo with discount cards.

Just letting you know the current data with lipid drugs. This Vascepa thing is very interesting. Impressive results with a really unclear mechanism.

NEJM - Error

I believe that Vascepa is the ethyl ester of an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish oil. You can get much the same result from another source of omega-3 fatty acids: walnut meat contains a significant amount of alpha-linolenic acid, one of the omega-3s. A lot cheaper than that prescription drug under patent.

alpha-Linolenic acid.jpg
 

Threegoofs

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I believe that Vascepa is the ethyl ester of an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish oil. You can get much the same result from another source of omega-3 fatty acids: walnut meat contains a significant amount of alpha-linolenic acid, one of the omega-3s. A lot cheaper than that prescription drug under patent.

View attachment 67244872

Maybe.

But I’m not sure I’d bet a patients life on it.

And I’m not sure how many walnuts you’d have to eat daily to equate to 4 grams. And ‘much the same’ is nice, but you can also get ‘much the same’ effect of statins by eating red chinese yeast. Not recommended.
 

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Maybe.

But I’m not sure I’d bet a patients life on it.

And I’m not sure how many walnuts you’d have to eat daily to equate to 4 grams. And ‘much the same’ is nice, but you can also get ‘much the same’ effect of statins by eating red chinese yeast. Not recommended.

I believe it's about half an ounce to get 25 mg of the omega-3.
 

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my LDL is below 130, but i have a pretty high HDL (100+.) it's a genetic thing. Mom is the same way. i do twice a year checkups / once a year bloodwork.

I'm saying this to both you and Elvira, do not be so concerned about the numbers. like mph for every driver, they vary, and therefore only serve as a possible behavioral modification for each of us. I've known both men and women with high numbers who lived long productive lives, others with low numbers who died young. It is how you feel that counts. Listen to your body. Any long lasting discomfort should be brought to the attention of a doctor with whom you feel confident, and that is still no guarantee. My lifelong and closest friend, at age 59, suffers from severe Alzheimers. He has no idea who he is, or anyone else, and soon will forget remembering how to breath. Both his parents lived well into their late 80's early 90's. I speak to him daily, and he has no idea who I am after a 50 year friendship which started with his long past brother in the service.

My second most oldest surviving friend, now 67, friends since we are adolescents, has a combined lipid count greater than 500. His father passed from a combination of a stroke and heart attacks at 41. His mother at 91 from cancer. She raised 4 young children herself, all professionals, and she was an attorney who no qualms about smacking me down when I needed it. Stress tests show no cumulative plaque development in his arteries, his heart in the shape of 30 year old's athlete. We eat out at least once weekly together, and nip a few drinks. You should all be as healthy as him. His only health issues is his miserable wife who has tortured him since his son was born 28 years ago and a bit of rheumatoid arthritis he manages with reduced salt intake.. Anyone else would have divorced her, he still loves her. No explanation. Just the way they are, and his doctor advises him to divorce her everytime he examines him for general health or other small items.

It is how you feel, not the numbers that matter. Know your own body. One thing that does matter, neither of us smoke tobacco. We have both been known to smoke during sex, figure that out for yourselves, no explanations will be forthcoming.
 

OldFatGuy

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There is no one size fits all approach to cholesterol management; I consider myself fortunate to be able to manage mine as I do.

Not everyone responds to particular interventions, and must seek a more aggressive approach.....glad you survived yours.


Keep surviving yours. Sometimes, it isn an issue of being more aggressive, but one, or combination works best for each of us. We all heard about your peccadillo of chasing naked fat women up the block, and if it works keeping you healthy, god bless.
 

Hawkeye10

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Keep surviving yours. Sometimes, it isn an issue of being more aggressive, but one, or combination works best for each of us. We all heard about your peccadillo of chasing naked fat women up the block, and if it works keeping you healthy, god bless.

:rock
 

Bum

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Keep surviving yours. Sometimes, it isn an issue of being more aggressive, but one, or combination works best for each of us. We all heard about your peccadillo of chasing naked fat women up the block, and if it works keeping you healthy, god bless.

:confused:

Actually.....I was chased down by a little redhead.
 
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