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How do you say Yahoo! in Chinese?

How should Yahoo! handle China's policy?

  • Yahoo! should do whatever China wants it to do or it should practice business else where.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Yahoo! should refuse to aid China's government in censorship and monitoring emails.

    Votes: 3 50.0%
  • Yahoo! should help with censorship, but refuse to go as far as monitoring emails.

    Votes: 1 16.7%
  • I'm more of a Google kind of guy anyway.

    Votes: 2 33.3%

  • Total voters
    6

Gandhi>Bush

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http://www.physorg.com/news6368.html

Media watchdog group Reporters Without Borders in Paris issued a scathing indictment of Yahoo! China for its IP address information sharing that contributed to the arrest and conviction of Shi Tao, a reporter from the Contemporary Business News based in Changsha, the provincial capital of Hunan province.

It is scary to retrace the simple steps landing Shi, 37, behind bars. He logged on to the Internet, went to the Chinese Yahoo! homepage, clicked on the mail icon, signed in with ID and password, saw the message "Welcome!" and then sent e-mail messages his government didn't like. Pressing the Enter button on those messages logged him off personal freedom for a decade.

SNIP

An interesting issue raised is a review of Yahoo!'s privacy policy in all languages. The company is known to have cooperated with U.S. law-enforcement officials after the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks and with the Chinese in cracking the Shi Tao case.

SNIP

Pain's group believes "at some point Yahoo! should say no to the Chinese authorities. Say OK, we agreed to censor such and such engine, but now you are going too far asking us to collaborate with the police to track down dissidents."

Reporters Without Borders is asking Yahoo! to take a strong position. It wants them to say "as an American company, we have to respect certain basic values, universal values, human rights; so that even if it's legal in your country, we as an American company won't do it."

Pain said what Yahoo! did was "probably legal, but it was totally immoral, totally not ethical and that is what we are condemning."

SNIP
This is a case that my Ethics Bowl team is going to regionals over tomorrow. We have alot of boring cases in this, but I thought this one was pretty interesting.

What do you think about Yahoo!'s actions?
 

Kandahar

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Eh, none of the poll options really match what I think of them. This came the closest:

Yahoo! should help with censorship, but refuse to go as far as monitoring emails.

Of course, I don't actually think they SHOULD help with censorship; I think it's an unfortunate reality of their doing business in China, and I can certainly understand that they need to follow the local laws. I'm of the school of thought that it's better that the Chinese have access to 95% of the information available on Yahoo!, than none at all.

Monitoring emails and collaborating with the Chinese government in implicating political dissidents is a different matter entirely. This goes way beyond the normal cost of doing business, and Yahoo! should be ashamed of themselves. Furthermore, it should be illegal in the United States for American companies to do such unethical things abroad.
 

scottyz

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Microsoft agreed to ban freedom from computers and the internet for the Chinese. Money talks.

China has not been entirely successful in sanitizing the internet, I've ever heard rumours they might give it up soon.
 

Kandahar

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scottyz said:
Microsoft agreed to ban freedom from computers and the internet for the Chinese. Money talks.

China has not been entirely successful in sanitizing the internet, I've ever heard rumours they might give it up soon.
I think they're going to have to abandon the "Great Firewall Of China" sooner or later. The Chinese government would rather look like heroes for allowing greater freedom of information, than look like idiots as the internet expands and there are more and more websites that they simply cannot censor.
 

scottyz

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Kandahar said:
I think they're going to have to abandon the "Great Firewall Of China" sooner or later. The Chinese government would rather look like heroes for allowing greater freedom of information, than look like idiots as the internet expands and there are more and more websites that they simply cannot censor.
I've read that Chinas youth have gotten pretty good at avoiding or fooling the censors. As their internet population grows it will be increasingly difficult to find enough man power to monitor the net. People are far more adaptive than then software designed to censor them at the moment.
 

Inuyasha

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Yah Hu? MIght be, who knows. Or is it Hu No Se.
 
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