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Has any astronomers discover a star system on the other side of our galaxy? Two-part question.

slavablueberryjam

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That was the first question above. The second one is is the supermassive black hole flat, so we can see beyond it?
 

Jkca1

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First question - Yes;

"Signs of a planet transiting a star outside of the Milky Way galaxy may have been detected for the first time."

Second question - Lots of theories but no facts to support them yet.
 

slavablueberryjam

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First question - Yes;

"Signs of a planet transiting a star outside of the Milky Way galaxy may have been detected for the first time."

Second question - Lots of theories but no facts to support them yet.
No, you misread my first question. The first question was about our own Milky Way. Has anyone seen a star on the other side of the black hole?
 

MamboDervish

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That was the first question above. The second one is is the supermassive black hole flat, so we can see beyond it?
The "other side of our galaxy" might still be too far to guarantee it's a "star system" - only that the amplitude pulses caused by a large planet might be periodically running interference. The new James Webb scope might soon refine our view enough to say definitively.

As for any "supermassive black hole", they tend to bend enough light around them to offer some distorted view of what lies beyond.
 

soylentgreen

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Does this help with the first?

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/astronomers-spot-the-most-distant-individual-star-ever-detected-in-outer-space-180979847/#:~:text=NASA's%20Hubble%20Space%20Telescope%20has,years%20after%20the%20Big%20Bang.
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has spotted the most distant single star ever detected in outer space.

Light from the star—dubbed Earendel from an Anglo-Saxon word meaning rising light or morning star—took 12.9 billion light-years to reach Earth and formed about 900 million years after the Big Bang. Earendel is 8.2 billion years older than the Earth

And yes, if earth is flat then black holes should be to.
 

Napoleon

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The answer to the first question is no. The cloud of dust and debris in the center of our galaxy prohibits us from observing the other side. The answer to the second question is also no.
 

phoenix2020

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The answer to the first question is no. The cloud of dust and debris in the center of our galaxy prohibits us from observing the other side. The answer to the second question is also no.
This. We actually lack information about anything obscured by the galactic core, all the way up to large intergalactic superstructures, much less a star or planet.

Theoretically, gravitational astronomy may help us overcome this obstacle to a limited degree.
 

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Here are two interesting things about what we have learned about the space we can see.

Astronomers have now confirmed more than 5,000 exoplanets – planets beyond our solar system. But it’s just a fraction of the likely hundreds of billions in our Milky Way galaxy.


Stunned scientists believe they’ve spotted the most distant object in space ever, located a whooping 13.5 billion light years away.

 

bomberfox

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The "other side of our galaxy" might still be too far to guarantee it's a "star system" - only that the amplitude pulses caused by a large planet might be periodically running interference. The new James Webb scope might soon refine our view enough to say definitively.

As for any "supermassive black hole", they tend to bend enough light around them to offer some distorted view of what lies beyond.
Interestingly gravitational lensing from that black hole might give us the key to finding it.
 

Deuce

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Interestingly gravitational lensing from that black hole might give us the key to finding it.
The galactic core is densely packed, obscuring much observation of anything. Light bending around the black hole is nice and all, but it's still passing through a heavily-obscured area.
 

Mircea

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That was the first question above.
Leave it to science to ask stupid questions.

Who cares if there's a solar system on the other side of our Galaxy?

How in the hell could that possibly help us?

If they wanna impress the hell out of me, they can turn Hubble around and start looking at the 10,000 G- and K-Class stars within 50 light years of our Solar System.

Do G-Class stars support life?

Um, this one -- our very own Sun -- does.

A K-Class star is only slightly less bright than a G-Class star.

The way in which G/K-Class stars form lends themselves to the formation of planets, in particular terrestrial planets, because unlike the bigger stars, they don't suck up all the material that could form planets.

So, how dumb are scientists?
 

bomberfox

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Leave it to science to ask stupid questions.

Who cares if there's a solar system on the other side of our Galaxy?

How in the hell could that possibly help us?

If they wanna impress the hell out of me, they can turn Hubble around and start looking at the 10,000 G- and K-Class stars within 50 light years of our Solar System.

Do G-Class stars support life?

Um, this one -- our very own Sun -- does.

A K-Class star is only slightly less bright than a G-Class star.

The way in which G/K-Class stars form lends themselves to the formation of planets, in particular terrestrial planets, because unlike the bigger stars, they don't suck up all the material that could form planets.

So, how dumb are scientists?
I dont think they are there specifically to impress you…

Not to mention this is not the only thing they are working on.
 

bomberfox

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The galactic core is densely packed, obscuring much observation of anything. Light bending around the black hole is nice and all, but it's still passing through a heavily-obscured area.
Since the galactic core is a super massive black hole, its gravitational strength at the edges is weaker and since ours is not an active galactic nuclei, we have a better chance of using it but you may be right.
 

Deuce

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Since the galactic core is a super massive black hole, its gravitational strength at the edges is weaker and since ours is not an active galactic nuclei, we have a better chance of using it but you may be right.
It's not just a black hole, there's a crapton of stuff around the whole area. Lots of dust.
 

bomberfox

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That was the first question above. The second one is is the supermassive black hole flat, so we can see beyond it?
What definition of flat are you using? By common definition Sagittarius a* is not flat, it is a sphere.
 

Napoleon

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If they wanna impress the hell out of me, they can turn Hubble around and start looking at the 10,000 G- and K-Class stars within 50 light years of our Solar System.

Do G-Class stars support life?

Um, this one -- our very own Sun -- does.

A K-Class star is only slightly less bright than a G-Class star.

The way in which G/K-Class stars form lends themselves to the formation of planets, in particular terrestrial planets, because unlike the bigger stars, they don't suck up all the material that could form planets.
There are no habitable worlds anywhere near our solar system.
 

Sabre

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There are no habitable worlds anywhere near our solar system.
Awful big statement considering astronomers have discovered more than 3,200 other stars (suns) with planets orbiting them (solar systems) in our galaxy and there are about 200 billion stars in our galaxy yet to be explored for planetary systems. Data from the Kepler space telescope estimates there could be as many as 300 million potentially habitable planets in our galaxy.
 

Napoleon

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There's a habitable world 11ish light-years away from us! It's going to be studied by the Webb because it is so promising.
You’re referring to the Gliese 1061 system. It has planets but we don’t even know what kind of planets they are.
 

Napoleon

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Yes, it does.
No. It has three or four hypothetical planets but nothing confirmed.

Correction: it has two confirmed (neither as habitable) and three or four hypothetical. Tau Ceti e is certainly not habitable. And we don’t know what kind of planet Tau Ceti f is but even if it is a rocky world it hasn’t been in the habitable zone long enough for life to develop.
 
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