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Ginsburg touches on Roe v. Wade in Kansas

Schweddy

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Source: mlive.com

LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) — U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, an abortion rights supporter, said the court's historic Roe v. Wade decision "seemed to me not the way courts generally work."

Ginsburg, who turns 72 on Tuesday, touched on the 1973 ruling legalizing abortion Thursday during a question-and-answer session with law students at the University of Kansas.
Before her appointment to the court in 1993, Ginsburg said she believed the nation might have been better off if abortion rights had been established more gradually.

When the court decided Roe v. Wade, Ginsburg said, "The law was changing."

"Women were lobbying around that issue," she said. "The Supreme Court stopped all that by deeming every law — even the most liberal — as unconstitutional. That seemed to me not the way courts generally work."

Justices sometimes comment publicly on past cases, though they typically avoid discussing cases still pending. At least three members of the court — Chief Justice William Rehnquist and Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas — have said Roe v. Wade was wrongly decided and should be overturned.
I thought a few of you might be interested in the 'gradual' concept.
What do you think she ment?
 

Batman

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vauge said:
I thought a few of you might be interested in the 'gradual' concept.
What do you think she ment?
My guess - it should have run, or continued to run it's course in the state legislators.
 

geekgrrl

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vauge said:
I thought a few of you might be interested in the 'gradual' concept. What do you think she me[a]nt?
Well, I don't know, but, hey, my guess is as good as any, right? Given the zeitgeist of the epoch (early '70s), it probably meant to choose a few more women each year to be allowed to undergo a safe, legal abortion until the conservatives and religious zealots became acclimatized to the concept of women controlling their own biological functioning. The less fortunate women not chosen for the escalation in this flagrant display of self-determination would be consigned to back-alley abortions in Tijuana. Each year, as fewer women died of botched abortions, the thinking probably went, the fringe right would probably be happy at least that the woman would get to live on.

Just my 2 cents' worth...
 

Schweddy

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I think she ment that it should have went to extream circumstances first then gradually move toward the law we have now over years.

Using this approach, abortion would not be as popular as it is now.
 

geekgrrl

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vauge said:
I think she ment that it should have went to extream circumstances first then gradually move toward the law we have now over years.

Using this approach, abortion would not be as popular as it is now.
To be honest, I have no idea what she might have been thinking. It was probably an ill-considered statement on Judge Ginsburg's part. I also would not characterize abortion as being "popular" in the same sense that reality shows are "popular". Nobody *wants* to have an abortion. They have one because they *need* to have one. It's not like something somebody does for fun (contrary to what some conservatives would have us believe).
 

akyron

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geekgrrl said:
To be honest, I have no idea what she might have been thinking. It was probably an ill-considered statement on Judge Ginsburg's part. I also would not characterize abortion as being "popular" in the same sense that reality shows are "popular". Nobody *wants* to have an abortion. They have one because they *need* to have one. It's not like something somebody does for fun (contrary to what some conservatives would have us believe).






pop·u·lar ( P ) Pronunciation Key (ppy-lr)
adj.
Widely liked or appreciated: a popular resort.
Liked by acquaintances; sought after for company: “Beware of over-great pleasure in being popular or even beloved” (Margaret Fuller).
Of, representing, or carried on by the people at large: the popular vote.
Fit for, adapted to, or reflecting the taste of the people at large: popular entertainment; popular science.
Accepted by or prevalent among the people in general: a popular misunderstanding of the issue.
Suited to or within the means of ordinary people: popular prices.
Originating among the people: popular legend.


She likely meant the definition in bold as you probably suspect.
 

geekgrrl

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akyron said:
pop·u·lar ( P ) Pronunciation Key (ppy-lr)
adj.

[snip]

Accepted by or prevalent among the people in general: a popular misunderstanding of the issue.
Suited to or within the means of ordinary people: popular prices.
Originating among the people: popular legend.

She likely meant the definition in bold as you probably suspect.

Vague was the one who used the term "popular", not Judge Ginsburg. The sense in which he used it appeared clear enough to me (it was neither of the two senses you highlight).

Fit for, adapted to, or reflecting the taste of the people at large: popular entertainment; popular science.

...that was the sense I interpreted from the context of his sentence (qv).

YMMV.
 
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