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Fallaci: "This is what I write about Europe..

Andalublue

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Very nice but that wasn't really my question. Do we have to combat islamic extremism?
Yes.


Every person is a potentiaI islamist.. relativism always works. What is moderate Islam other then a term we invented to separate muslim extremists, and even then you could argue that one extremist differs from the other.
No, I don't understand your point. Of course every person is a potential islamist, just as every person is a potential Nazi, Commie, Republican, whatever. Not all observant Moslems are likely to join the Islamist or Wahhabist factions, the ones that plan and execute terrorist attacks. Not all Christians are going to join the WBC, the Lord's Resistance Army or the abortion clinic bombers. Some people are drawn to extremism, others not.

It's all in the eye of the beholder. I wouldn't dream of wasting your time by suggesting that dangerous, unreliable people like George Galloway couldn't make a true statement. Pipes 'article' consists for 90% out of quotes, the only opinion it contains is about the quality of Fallaci's work.

I'm sure George Galloway may have made a true statement at some point, but I wouldn't expect you to accord that true statement much credibility given the entirety of his actions and statements. All liars and demagogues can make truthful, even insightful statements. That doesn't stop them from being liars and demagogues.
 

mbig

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andalueblue said:
I wouildn't take too much notice of what Pipes says about anyone - Falacci or whoever - this is what Christopher Hitchens thinks of him...

Daniel Pipes is not a man of peace. - By Christopher Hitchens - Slate Magazine

Pipes... employs the fears and insecurities created by Islamic extremism to slander or misrepresent those who disagree with him.

Pipes 'article' consists for 90% out of quotes, the only opinion it contains is about the quality of Fallaci's work.
As you point out too delicately, andalublue engaged in the classic Fallacy -- ad hom debate.

Going something like "Because Hitchens says something bad about Pipes, we can't rely on anything he says". (!)

Which is not only Ridiculous, but as you also point out, pretty irrelevant to even mention in such a short piece that basically only quotes Fallaci anyway.
And further.. bizarrely assumes Hitchens is some kind of ultimate authority.
In fact, agree with Pipes or not, HE'S the one with the credentials on Islam.

Andalublue always engages in Disingenuous (at best) debate. Were I to indulge/continue that inanity, I need only find someone else who says something bad about Hitchens...
ad infinitum, ad absurdem.

(For the record, I do like/Have quoted Hitch when's he's not hungover or just plain contrary.)
 
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Andalublue

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As you point out too delicately, andalublue engaged in the classic Fallacy -- ad hom debate.

Going something like "Because Hitchens says something bad about Pipes, we can't rely on anything he says". (!)

Which is not only Ridiculous, but as you also point out, pretty irrelevant to even mention in such a short piece that basically only quotes Fallaci anyway.
And further.. bizarrely assumes Hitchens is some kind of ultimate authority.
In fact, agree with Pipes or not, HE'S the one with the credentials on Islam.

Andalublue always engages in Disingenuous (at best) debate. Were I to indulge/continue that inanity, I need only find someone else who says something bad about Hitchens...
ad infinitum, ad absurdem.

(For the record, I do like/Have quoted Hitch when's he's not hungover or just plain contrary.)

Daniel, is that you? It must be because of this:
In fact, agree with Pipes or not, HE'S the one with the credentials on Islam.

A phrase only Pipes and Old Mother Pipes would be able to write and keep a straight face.
 

mbig

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Daniel, is that you? It must be because of this:
mbig said:
In fact, agree with Pipes or not, HE'S the one with the credentials on Islam.

A phrase only Pipes and Old Mother Pipes would be able to write and keep a straight face.
Didn't want to answer immediately - better for a self-controlled tactical bump when it moves down the page.

As usual andalublue's claims are Preposterous and show absolutely NO knowledge.
Ridiculous.

I think it only fair to use the same source for both Hitchens' and Pipes' "credentials on Islam".

Christopher Hitchens - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Wiki said:
".. He was educated at the independent Leys School, in Cambridge, and then later at Balliol College, Oxford. He was tutored there by Steven Lukes, and read philosophy, politics, and economics. Hitchens was "bowled over" in his adolescence by Richard Llewellyn's How Green Was My Valley, Arthur Koestler's Darkness at Noon, Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment, R. H. Tawney's critique on Religion and the Rise of Capitalism, and the works of George Orwell.[16] In 1968, he took part in the TV quiz show University Challenge.[18]

Hitchens has written of his homosexual experiences when in boarding school in his memoir, Hitch-22.[19] These experiences continued in his college years when he allegedly had relationships with two men who eventually became a part of the Thatcher government.[20]

In the 1960s, Hitchens joined the political left, drawn by his anger over the Vietnam war, nuclear weapons, racism, and "oligarchy", including that of "the unaccountable corporation". He would express affinity to the politically charged countercultural and protest movements of the 1960s and 70s. However, he deplored the rife recreational drug use of the time, which he describes as hedonistic.[21]

He joined the Labour Party in 1965, but was expelled in 1967 along with the majority of the Labour students' organization, because of what Hitchens called "Prime Minister Harold Wilson's contemptible support for the war in Vietnam".[22] Under the influence of Peter Sedgwick, translator of Russian revolutionary and Soviet dissident Victor Serge, Hitchens forged an ideological interest in Trotskyist and anti-Stalinist socialism.[16] Shortly thereafter, he joined "a small but growing post-Trotskyite Luxemburgist sect".[23] Throughout his student days, he was on many occasions arrested and assaulted in the various political protests and activities in which he participated.
Anyone see ANYTHING in there about Muslims? Islam/Islamic history? Arabic? Middle East travel? Middle East residence?
NADA.


Daniel Pipes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Education

Pipes attended the Harvard pre-school, then received a private school education, partly abroad. He enrolled in Harvard University, where his father was then still a professor, in the fall of 1967; for his first two years he studied mathematics, but has said: "I wasn't smart enough. So I chose to become a historian."[15] He said he "found the material too abstract."[16]

He credits visits to the Sahara Desert in 1968 and the Sinai Desert in 1969 for piquing his interest in the Arabic language,[15] and visits to Niger and Tunisia for piquing his interest in the Islamic world, and he changed his major to Middle East history.[16]

For the next two years Pipes studied Arabic and the Middle East, obtaining a B.A. in history in 1971; his senior thesis was titled A Medieval Islamic Debate: The World Created in Eternity, a study of Al-Ghazali. [15]
After graduating in 1971, Pipes spent nearly two years in Cairo. He learned Arabic and studied the Quran, which he states gave him an appreciation for Islam.[16]

Career in academia

Pipes returned to Harvard in 1973 and obtained a Ph.D. in medieval Islamic history[14] in 1978.
His Ph.D. dissertation eventually became his first book, 'Slave Soldiers and Islam', in 1981.
He studied abroad for six years, three of which were spent in Egypt, where he wrote a book on colloquial Egyptian Arabic which was published in 1983.
He switched his academic interest from medieval Islamic studies to modern Islam in the late 1970s.
[14]

He taught world history at the University of Chicago from 1978 to 1982, history at Harvard from 1983 to 1984, and policy and strategy at the Naval War College from 1984 to 1986.
In 1983, Pipes served on the policy-planning staff at the State Department.[17]

Post-academia

Pipes largely retired from academia after 1986, though in 2007 he taught a course titled "International Relations: Islam and Politics" as a visiting professor at Pepperdine University's School of Public Policy.[18] Pipes told an interviewer from Harvard Magazine that he has "the simple politics of a truck driver, not the complex ones of an academic. My viewpoint is not congenial with institutions of higher learning.".[15] His articles have been translated into numerous languages, including Latin.[19]

From 1986 on, Pipes worked for various think tanks. From 1986 to 1993 he was director of the Philadelphia-based Foreign Policy Research Institute (FPRI) and editor of its journal, Orbis. In 1990 he organized the Middle East Forum as a unit of FPRI; it became an independent organization with himself as head. Pipes edits its journal, the Middle East Quarterly. In 2002, he established Campus Watch as a project of the Middle East Forum.

In 2003, President George W. Bush nominated Pipes for the board of the United States Institute of Peace. After a controversy including a filibuster by Democratic Senators,[20] Pipes obtained the position by recess appointment.[15]

The point is so overwhelmingly made now, one can be sure we'll get another utterly bogus reply.
Tho it certainly can't be any more bogus or embarrassing than the last.
 
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