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Face shields ineffective at trapping aerosols, says Japanese supercomputer

JacksinPA

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Simulation using world’s fastest supercomputer casts doubt on effectiveness in preventing spread of coronavirus

Plastic face shields are almost totally ineffective at trapping respiratory aerosols, according to modelling in Japan, casting doubt on their effectiveness in preventing the spread of coronavirus.
A simulation using Fugaku, the world’s fastest supercomputer, found that almost 100% of airborne droplets of less than 5 micrometres in size escaped through plastic visors of the kind often used by people working in service industries.


One micrometre is one millionth of a metre.

In addition, about half of larger droplets measuring 50 micrometres found their way into the air, according to Riken, a government-backed research institute in the western city of Kobe.
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This week, senior scientists in Britain criticised the government for stressing the importance of hand-washing while placing insufficient emphasis on aerosol transmission and ventilation, factors that Japanese authorities have outlined in public health advice throughout the pandemic.

As some countries have attempted to open up their economies, face shields are becoming a common sight in sectors that emphasise contact with the public, such as shops and beauty salons.
Makoto Tsubokura, team leader at Riken’s centre for computational science, said the simulation combined air flow with the reproduction of tens of thousand of droplets of different sizes, from under 1 micrometre to several hundred micrometres.

He cautioned against wearing face visors as an alternative to masks.
“Judging from the results of the simulation, unfortunately the effectiveness of face guards in preventing droplets from spreading from an infected person’s mouth is limited compared with masks,” Tsubokura told the Guardian.

“This is especially true for small droplets of less than 20 micrometres,” he said, adding that all of the much smaller aerosol particles were found to escape through the gap between the face and the face shield. “At the same time, it somehow works for the droplets larger than 50 micrometres.”

Tsubokura suggested that people who are advised not to wear masks, such as those with underlying respiratory problems and small children, could wear face shields instead, but only outdoors or in indoor settings that are properly ventilated.

It recently found that face masks made from non-woven fabric are more effective at blocking the spread of Covid-19 via airborne droplets than those made of cotton and polyester
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I've seen recent video showing the aerosol droplets actually getting under the bottom of the face shields, making them worse than not using them..
 

Thom Paine

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Simulation using world’s fastest supercomputer casts doubt on effectiveness in preventing spread of coronavirus

Plastic face shields are almost totally ineffective at trapping respiratory aerosols, according to modelling in Japan, casting doubt on their effectiveness in preventing the spread of coronavirus.
A simulation using Fugaku, the world’s fastest supercomputer, found that almost 100% of airborne droplets of less than 5 micrometres in size escaped through plastic visors of the kind often used by people working in service industries.


One micrometre is one millionth of a metre.

In addition, about half of larger droplets measuring 50 micrometres found their way into the air, according to Riken, a government-backed research institute in the western city of Kobe.
Advertisement

This week, senior scientists in Britain criticised the government for stressing the importance of hand-washing while placing insufficient emphasis on aerosol transmission and ventilation, factors that Japanese authorities have outlined in public health advice throughout the pandemic.

As some countries have attempted to open up their economies, face shields are becoming a common sight in sectors that emphasise contact with the public, such as shops and beauty salons.
Makoto Tsubokura, team leader at Riken’s centre for computational science, said the simulation combined air flow with the reproduction of tens of thousand of droplets of different sizes, from under 1 micrometre to several hundred micrometres.

He cautioned against wearing face visors as an alternative to masks.
“Judging from the results of the simulation, unfortunately the effectiveness of face guards in preventing droplets from spreading from an infected person’s mouth is limited compared with masks,” Tsubokura told the Guardian.

“This is especially true for small droplets of less than 20 micrometres,” he said, adding that all of the much smaller aerosol particles were found to escape through the gap between the face and the face shield. “At the same time, it somehow works for the droplets larger than 50 micrometres.”

Tsubokura suggested that people who are advised not to wear masks, such as those with underlying respiratory problems and small children, could wear face shields instead, but only outdoors or in indoor settings that are properly ventilated.

It recently found that face masks made from non-woven fabric are more effective at blocking the spread of Covid-19 via airborne droplets than those made of cotton and polyester
==========================================================
I've seen recent video showing the aerosol droplets actually getting under the bottom of the face shields, making them worse than not using them..

Interesting ... in order for people to accept the obvious as fact, it is necessary to for that obvious fact be declared so by a computer !
 

VySky

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There are machinist I couldn't get to wear a face shield. Insanity
 

Moderate Right

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Simulation using world’s fastest supercomputer casts doubt on effectiveness in preventing spread of coronavirus

Plastic face shields are almost totally ineffective at trapping respiratory aerosols, according to modelling in Japan, casting doubt on their effectiveness in preventing the spread of coronavirus.
A simulation using Fugaku, the world’s fastest supercomputer, found that almost 100% of airborne droplets of less than 5 micrometres in size escaped through plastic visors of the kind often used by people working in service industries.


One micrometre is one millionth of a metre.

In addition, about half of larger droplets measuring 50 micrometres found their way into the air, according to Riken, a government-backed research institute in the western city of Kobe.
Advertisement

This week, senior scientists in Britain criticised the government for stressing the importance of hand-washing while placing insufficient emphasis on aerosol transmission and ventilation, factors that Japanese authorities have outlined in public health advice throughout the pandemic.

As some countries have attempted to open up their economies, face shields are becoming a common sight in sectors that emphasise contact with the public, such as shops and beauty salons.
Makoto Tsubokura, team leader at Riken’s centre for computational science, said the simulation combined air flow with the reproduction of tens of thousand of droplets of different sizes, from under 1 micrometre to several hundred micrometres.

He cautioned against wearing face visors as an alternative to masks.
“Judging from the results of the simulation, unfortunately the effectiveness of face guards in preventing droplets from spreading from an infected person’s mouth is limited compared with masks,” Tsubokura told the Guardian.

“This is especially true for small droplets of less than 20 micrometres,” he said, adding that all of the much smaller aerosol particles were found to escape through the gap between the face and the face shield. “At the same time, it somehow works for the droplets larger than 50 micrometres.”

Tsubokura suggested that people who are advised not to wear masks, such as those with underlying respiratory problems and small children, could wear face shields instead, but only outdoors or in indoor settings that are properly ventilated.

It recently found that face masks made from non-woven fabric are more effective at blocking the spread of Covid-19 via airborne droplets than those made of cotton and polyester
==========================================================
I've seen recent video showing the aerosol droplets actually getting under the bottom of the face shields, making them worse than not using them..
That's because the aerosols are in the air, basically everywhere indoors. Once a Covid patient breathes the aerosols out, they go into the air and are spread around the whole room by air movements, particularly by HVAC systems and ceiling fans. Wearing a shield that allows air in through openings is kind of a worthless endeavor. Unlike the idiots on the left here on DP I believe that masks work better for breathing in and if you have your mask on, it greatly filters out the virus particles. A face shield, if it is not enclosed, doesn't filter out particles you breath in, it just blocks particles coming at you directly from the area you are facing but not the rest of the room. This is why people are fools for going to restaurants. I've seen idiots waiting outside with masks on, going in with masks on, but once you are sitting at a table you don't have your mask on. And, it doesn't matter if you are the only table in the place or there is just one other table clear on the other side of the room. If a Covid patient had been in there and breathed aerosols into the room and then left and you come in, those aerosols are still in the room, spread all over by the HVAC system and you will breathe them in, even if you are the only table in the restaurant.
 
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