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Egypt's Military Issues 48-hour Ultimatum.....

MMC

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It appears All that wheeling and dealing and ass kissing by Team Obama is all for naught. Morsi and his MB must go. Egypt's Military has spoken. This could hurt the MB all over the place, again. Which is a good thing. Wonder what Obama has to say now that who he backs the people says he must go. Plus now Egypt's Military saying the same thing. Where's Johnny Quest McCain? Looks like he was wrong as well. Time for Johnny to hit pasture. Remember Kerry running over there before he became SOS. He said he wanted to see Democracy in Action. What Happened? :lol:


Egypt's powerful military warned on Monday it will intervene if the Islamist president doesn't "meet the people's demands," giving him and his opponents two days to reach an agreement, as thousands of protesters massed for a second day calling on Mohammed Morsi to step down.

The 48-hour ultimatum, said the military, was a "last chance."



The military's statement, read on state television, puts enormous pressure on Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood. So far, the president has vowed he will remain in his position, but the opposition and crowds in the street — who numbered in the millions nationwide on Sunday — have made clear they will accept nothing less than his departure and a transition to early presidential elections.

That makes military action when the deadline runs out nearly inevitable, since a deal seems unlikely. It did not define the "people's demands" that must be met. But it strongly suggested that Sunday's gigantic rallies expressed the desire of Egyptians, raising the likelihood it would insist on Morsi's departure.

Cheers erupted from many protesters watching the statement in Cairo's Tahrir Square as military helicopters buzzed overhead. "Come out, el-Sissi. The people want to topple the regime," protesters in the Nile Delta city of Mahalla el-Kubra chanted, urging military chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi to intervene.

Already, the military's presence in Cairo has increased at sensitive spots the past two days. Troops on Monday manned checkpoints on roads leading to a pro-Morsi rally of Islamists near his palace. They checked cars for weapons, after repeated reports some Islamists were arming themselves.

"The Armed Forces repeat its call for the people's demands to be met and give everyone 48 hours as a last chance to shoulder the burden of the historic moment," it said.
If the demands are not realized in that time, the military would be obliged to "announce a road-map for the future and the steps for overseeing its implementation, with participation of all patriotic and sincere parties and movements ... excluding no one."


In a sign of Morsi's growing isolation, five Cabinet ministers met Monday to consider resigning their posts and joining the protest movement, the state news agency said. The meeting gathered the communications, legal affairs, environment, tourism and water utilities ministers, MENA reported.

The main rallies in Cairo were largely peaceful, but deadly violence broke out in several parts of the country, often when marchers came under gunfire, apparently from Islamists. At least 16 people were killed and more than 780 injured, Health Ministry spokesman Yehya Moussa told state television.

In Cairo, protesters Sunday night attacked the Brotherhood's main headquarters, pelting it with stones and firebombs. Brotherhood backers barricaded inside opened fire on them in clashes that went on for hours and left eight dead. In the early hours Monday, protesters breached the walls of the six-story luxury villa and stormed inside.

They carted off furniture, files, rugs, blankets, air conditioning units and portraits of Morsi, according to an Associated Press journalist at the scene. One protester emerged with a pistol and handed it over to a policeman outside.....snip~

Egypt's military issues 48-hour ultimatum
 

MMC

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Looks Like the Muslim Brotherhood is going to be taken down a bit Politically and Physically. This will definitely cause them some big time money. Which means they may not be able to fund their Operations in Syria. Which the MB losing anywhere is a good thing.
 

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It appears All that wheeling and dealing and ass kissing by Team Obama is all for naught. Morsi and his MB must go. Egypt's Military has spoken. This could hurt the MB all over the place, again. Which is a good thing. Wonder what Obama has to say now that who he backs the people says he must go. Plus now Egypt's Military saying the same thing. Where's Johnny Quest McCain? Looks like he was wrong as well. Time for Johnny to hit pasture. Remember Kerry running over there before he became SOS. He said he wanted to see Democracy in Action. What Happened? :lol:


Egypt's powerful military warned on Monday it will intervene if the Islamist president doesn't "meet the people's demands," giving him and his opponents two days to reach an agreement, as thousands of protesters massed for a second day calling on Mohammed Morsi to step down.

The 48-hour ultimatum, said the military, was a "last chance."



The military's statement, read on state television, puts enormous pressure on Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood. So far, the president has vowed he will remain in his position, but the opposition and crowds in the street — who numbered in the millions nationwide on Sunday — have made clear they will accept nothing less than his departure and a transition to early presidential elections.

That makes military action when the deadline runs out nearly inevitable, since a deal seems unlikely. It did not define the "people's demands" that must be met. But it strongly suggested that Sunday's gigantic rallies expressed the desire of Egyptians, raising the likelihood it would insist on Morsi's departure.

Cheers erupted from many protesters watching the statement in Cairo's Tahrir Square as military helicopters buzzed overhead. "Come out, el-Sissi. The people want to topple the regime," protesters in the Nile Delta city of Mahalla el-Kubra chanted, urging military chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi to intervene.

Already, the military's presence in Cairo has increased at sensitive spots the past two days. Troops on Monday manned checkpoints on roads leading to a pro-Morsi rally of Islamists near his palace. They checked cars for weapons, after repeated reports some Islamists were arming themselves.

"The Armed Forces repeat its call for the people's demands to be met and give everyone 48 hours as a last chance to shoulder the burden of the historic moment," it said.
If the demands are not realized in that time, the military would be obliged to "announce a road-map for the future and the steps for overseeing its implementation, with participation of all patriotic and sincere parties and movements ... excluding no one."


In a sign of Morsi's growing isolation, five Cabinet ministers met Monday to consider resigning their posts and joining the protest movement, the state news agency said. The meeting gathered the communications, legal affairs, environment, tourism and water utilities ministers, MENA reported.

The main rallies in Cairo were largely peaceful, but deadly violence broke out in several parts of the country, often when marchers came under gunfire, apparently from Islamists. At least 16 people were killed and more than 780 injured, Health Ministry spokesman Yehya Moussa told state television.

In Cairo, protesters Sunday night attacked the Brotherhood's main headquarters, pelting it with stones and firebombs. Brotherhood backers barricaded inside opened fire on them in clashes that went on for hours and left eight dead. In the early hours Monday, protesters breached the walls of the six-story luxury villa and stormed inside.

They carted off furniture, files, rugs, blankets, air conditioning units and portraits of Morsi, according to an Associated Press journalist at the scene. One protester emerged with a pistol and handed it over to a policeman outside.....snip~

Egypt's military issues 48-hour ultimatum
I somewhat expected this.With Mubarik being x-military and being tried by MB,
I'm not surprised that the military would push back.
IMO its a good thing.Rightly or wrongly Mubarik was a good ally to us.:twocents:
 

MMC

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I somewhat expected this.With Mubarik being x-military and being tried by MB,
I'm not surprised that the military would push back.
IMO its a good thing.Rightly or wrongly Mubarik was a good ally to us.:twocents:
Heya Penn. :2wave: Well one thing is clear.....the MB isn't worth having as an Ally. Nor as a friend. With friends like them.....who needs enemies. You would think Both sides of the Aisle would have figured that one out by now.
 

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The Egypt's military is only interested in stability and gives such an ultimatum because there are some generals taking active part in the tourist industry. Due to the political chaos the tourist sector is quite stricken. Some people in high positions loose money hour after hour. For sure, this won't stop after the the ultimatum ends.
 

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Btw. the killing in Egypt has just begun.
I really hope that there is no second Syria raised at the European border.
 

MMC

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Btw. the killing in Egypt has just begun.
I really hope that there is no second Syria raised at the European border.
Hiya KS. :2wave: What killing would that be and by who and upon whom?

Btw Welcome to the Forums of Debate Politics.
 

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Hello! Ty!
The islamists want Morsi to stay and declared that they will fight for him. If necessary, they will contend against the military, I heard today.
I don't want to blame any group there at Tahrir. Neither the islamists nor the demonstrators are monolithic groups. On both sides there are probably only sub-groups interested in violence. These groups are responsible for the killing and have to be stopped by the military. In order to do that soldiers will also use violence, I suspect. I am pretty sure, the next hours determine the development of Egypt for the next months.
 

MMC

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Crisis stirs deadly protests in Egypt; military deadline looms - CNN.com

He has about 45 minutes left, and neither side seems to be backing down. I have a gut feeling that this is going to get ugly, hopefully we don't have another Syria on our hands. By the way, Welcome to DP Forum.
Yep.....I was just going to check on this. 10mins our time. That's what Egypt's Military has given him to. Morsi says he isn't going anywhere. Despite his ministers bailing on him all over the Place. The MB had better think very serious like. To lose all their major base of operations and legitimacy.....could be the start of the End for them. It will also effect their good relations with AQ, as in taking the hit.

Which myself.....I wouldn't have any problem with it whatsoever.
 

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Egypt may be the single best example of "Be careful what you wish for, you might just get it"! You gotta feel for those folks.
 

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I agree with the Sentiments of the Article.....Egypt has come late to its own Coup. Morsi tried one last ditch effort. The Military and the People didn't go for it. Yet no battles between the MB and the Egyptian military. Anyone think that most of the MB has slunked away to go back to hiding in their underground?


Mursi, army refuse to budge as deadline passes.....



Egypt's armed forces and Islamist President Mohamed Mursi refused to back down on Wednesday as a deadline for a military takeover passed with rival demonstrators out in force in the streets of Cairo.

Military chiefs, vowing to restore order in a country racked by protests over Mursi's Islamist policies, issued a call to battle in a statement headlined "The Final Hours". They said they were willing to shed blood against "terrorists and fools" after Mursi refused to give up his elected office.

Armored vehicles took up position outside the state broadcasting headquarters on the Nile River bank, where soldiers patrolled the corridors and non-essential staff were sent home. But there was no other immediate sign of military action to remove the Muslim Brotherhood president.

In a last-ditch statement a few minutes before the 5 p.m. (11:00 a.m. EDT) deadline, Mursi's office said a coalition government could be part of an initiative to overcome a political crisis. But opposition parties refused to negotiate with him and met instead with the commander of the armed forces.

As the ultimatum expired, hundreds of thousands of anti-Mursi protesters in Tahrir Square in central Cairo let off fireworks, cheered and waved Egyptian flags in celebration.

There was no immediate word from the armed forces, and a spokesman said no fixed time had been set for a statement. Egyptian blogger Su Zee tweeted: "And in typical Egyptian fashion, #egypt is late for its own coup.".....snip~

Mursi, army refuse to budge as deadline passes
 

MMC

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Here they are saying Egypt's Army has placed some of the MB under House Arrest. Also put up travel bans. Nothing on the Army has taken Morsi tho.

Egypt: Army tightens grip as ultimatum passes.....


- Opponents of Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi shout slogans during a protest in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, July 3, 2013. Egypt's military moved to tighten its control on key institutions Wednesday, even putting officers in the newsroom of state TV, in preparation for an almost certain push to remove the country's Islamist president when an afternoon ultimatum expires.....

Egypt's military moved to tighten its control of key institutions Wednesday, putting officers in the newsroom of state TV, in preparation for an almost certain push to remove President Mohammed Morsi with the expiration of an afternoon deadline.

Just before the military's deadline expired, Morsi repeated a vow not to step down in the face of demands by millions of protesters in the streets in the biggest anti-government rallies the country has seen, surpassing even those in the uprising that ousted against his autocratic predecessor Hosni Mubarak.

The military on Monday had given Morsi an ultimatum to meet the protesters' demands within 48 hours, or it would intervene and impose a plan to suspend the constitution, dissolve parliament and replace him with a leadership council. That deadline expired Wednesday afternoon.

Morsi's Islamist supporters have vowed to resist what they call a coup against democracy, and have also taken to the streets by the tens of thousands. At least 39 people have been killed in clashes since Sunday, raising fears of further bloodshed.

Earlier in the day, the head of the army, Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, met with leading reform advocate Mohammed ElBaradei, Egypt's top Muslim cleric — Al-Azhar Sheik Ahmed el-Tayeb — and Coptic Pope Tawadros II to discuss its political road map, a spokesman for the senior opposition National Democratic Front, Khaled Daoud, said on state TV.

But at the main pro-Morsi protest in Cairo, hard-line cleric Magdy Hussein read a statement to the crowds of thousands, saying that any move against the president would be considered "a full coup."

"Wake up el-Sissi, Morsi is my president," the crowds chanted outside the Rabia al-Adawiya Moqsue. "We will not bring back the military rule."

The authoritative, state-run Al-Ahram newspaper — which also seemed to be following a military line — reported that the military had placed several leaders of Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood under surveillance and issued a foreign travel ban on the Islamist group's top leaders.

It said several top Brotherhood leaders have been put under house arrest, though there was no immediate confirmation of which figures it was referring to. It also said arms caches allegedly belonging to the Brotherhood have been located.

Security officials at Cairo's international airport said the travel ban covered among others the Brotherhood's former leader Mahdi Akef and the group's senior official Mohammed el-Beltagi and the leader of the Islamist Wasat party Abou Ela Madi and his deputy Essam Sultan.

Fearing that Washington's most important Arab ally would descend into chaos, U.S. officials said they are urging Morsi to take immediate steps to address opposition grievances, telling the protesters to remain peaceful and reminding the army that a coup could have consequences for the massive American military aid package it receives. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly.....snip~

Egypt: Army tightens grip as ultimatum passes
 

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Here they are saying Egypt's Army has placed some of the MB under House Arrest. Also put up travel bans. Nothing on the Army has taken Morsi tho.

Egypt: Army tightens grip as ultimatum passes.....


- Opponents of Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi shout slogans during a protest in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, July 3, 2013. Egypt's military moved to tighten its control on key institutions Wednesday, even putting officers in the newsroom of state TV, in preparation for an almost certain push to remove the country's Islamist president when an afternoon ultimatum expires.....

Egypt's military moved to tighten its control of key institutions Wednesday, putting officers in the newsroom of state TV, in preparation for an almost certain push to remove President Mohammed Morsi with the expiration of an afternoon deadline.

Just before the military's deadline expired, Morsi repeated a vow not to step down in the face of demands by millions of protesters in the streets in the biggest anti-government rallies the country has seen, surpassing even those in the uprising that ousted against his autocratic predecessor Hosni Mubarak.

The military on Monday had given Morsi an ultimatum to meet the protesters' demands within 48 hours, or it would intervene and impose a plan to suspend the constitution, dissolve parliament and replace him with a leadership council. That deadline expired Wednesday afternoon.

Morsi's Islamist supporters have vowed to resist what they call a coup against democracy, and have also taken to the streets by the tens of thousands. At least 39 people have been killed in clashes since Sunday, raising fears of further bloodshed.

Earlier in the day, the head of the army, Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, met with leading reform advocate Mohammed ElBaradei, Egypt's top Muslim cleric — Al-Azhar Sheik Ahmed el-Tayeb — and Coptic Pope Tawadros II to discuss its political road map, a spokesman for the senior opposition National Democratic Front, Khaled Daoud, said on state TV.

But at the main pro-Morsi protest in Cairo, hard-line cleric Magdy Hussein read a statement to the crowds of thousands, saying that any move against the president would be considered "a full coup."

"Wake up el-Sissi, Morsi is my president," the crowds chanted outside the Rabia al-Adawiya Moqsue. "We will not bring back the military rule."

The authoritative, state-run Al-Ahram newspaper — which also seemed to be following a military line — reported that the military had placed several leaders of Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood under surveillance and issued a foreign travel ban on the Islamist group's top leaders.

It said several top Brotherhood leaders have been put under house arrest, though there was no immediate confirmation of which figures it was referring to. It also said arms caches allegedly belonging to the Brotherhood have been located.

Security officials at Cairo's international airport said the travel ban covered among others the Brotherhood's former leader Mahdi Akef and the group's senior official Mohammed el-Beltagi and the leader of the Islamist Wasat party Abou Ela Madi and his deputy Essam Sultan.

Fearing that Washington's most important Arab ally would descend into chaos, U.S. officials said they are urging Morsi to take immediate steps to address opposition grievances, telling the protesters to remain peaceful and reminding the army that a coup could have consequences for the massive American military aid package it receives. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly.....snip~

Egypt: Army tightens grip as ultimatum passes
Although I am glad Morsi is leaving, I am worried that this might set an unfortunate precedent. Hopefully the military takeover does not eventually result in another dictatorship, for the Egyptians' sake (although a dictatorship might be better for US interests).
 

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Although I am glad Morsi is leaving, I am worried that this might set an unfortunate precedent. Hopefully the military takeover does not eventually result in another dictatorship, for the Egyptians' sake (although a dictatorship might be better for US interests).
I don't see that happening at all.
 

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Well one thing is clear.....the MB isn't worth having as an Ally. Nor as a friend. With friends like them.....who needs enemies.
That pretty well describes everyone in the Middle East.

Including Israel.

To president Obama's credit, at least he hasn't put hundreds of thousands of American boots on the ground in every Middle Eastern ****hole that could use a good ass kicking.
 

MMC

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That pretty well describes everyone in the Middle East.

Including Israel.

To president Obama's credit, at least he hasn't put hundreds of thousands of American boots on the ground in every Middle Eastern ****hole that could use a good ass kicking.
Heya Soot. :2wave: Well Lets See.....he has them In Turkey, Jordan, Israel, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Which doesn't count the 5th Fleet in and around Bahrain. Plus the Ships we have in the Arabian Sea. Which Across the Way from Oman passing the Red Sea. Is Djihbouti Africa. Troops and Drone Base.
 

MMC

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Although I am glad Morsi is leaving, I am worried that this might set an unfortunate precedent. Hopefully the military takeover does not eventually result in another dictatorship, for the Egyptians' sake (although a dictatorship might be better for US interests).
Heya D-152 . :2wave: I think it would be a Choice of the lesser two evils. Martial law and Military Rule.....or to be led by the MB. All Morsi and the MB will do is play on Democracy so they can scam the People and stay in power. While thinking they can trick the rest of the world playing their game with the Sectarian Divide.

Although myself.....I think we could solve the problem by hunting down all those Sunni clerics that like to think they are in control. Let them pick out some new religious leaders. Ones that actually have some common sense to go with their intelligence. Start ending some of the BS talking they do.
 

soot

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Well Lets See.....he has them In Turkey, Jordan, Israel, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Which doesn't count the 5th Fleet in and around Bahrain. Plus the Ships we have in the Arabian Sea. Which Across the Way from Oman passing the Red Sea. Is Djihbouti Africa. Troops and Drone Base.
Ummm hmmm...

Because a standard deployment to Israel, or ships in port in Bahrain is the same thing as two, more or less, unilateral invasions of soverign nations to hunt for boogeymen and make-believe WMDs.

Look, I'm not fan of President Obama, but, again, to his credit, at least he's doing things that we have no bussiness doing with a minimal footprint.

I think he's to be commended for at least that much.

Ideally we wouldn't be involved in local sectarian/political/religious/tribal issues at all, but if we're going to get involved I much prefer a Special Forces A Team (or two) or a few drones to deploying several Divisions, then realizing several Divisions weren't nearly enough and "surging" another Division or two in on top of them, despite the fact that the insufficency of the initial deployment already allowed things to collapse into total chaos.

I mean, there's a wrong way to use the American military, and then there's a really, really wrong way to use the Amrican military. At least he's ered on the side of not completely dicking things up.
 

MMC

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Ummm hmmm...

Because a standard deployment to Israel, or ships in port in Bahrain is the same thing as two, more or less, unilateral invasions of soverign nations to hunt for boogeymen and make-believe WMDs.

Look, I'm not fan of President Obama, but, again, to his credit, at least he's doing things that we have no bussiness doing with a minimal footprint.

I think he's to be commended for at least that much.

Ideally we wouldn't be involved in local sectarian/political/religious/tribal issues at all, but if we're going to get involved I much prefer a Special Forces A Team (or two) or a few drones to deploying several Divisions, then realizing several Divisions weren't nearly enough and "surging" another Division or two in on top of them, despite the fact that the insufficency of the initial deployment already allowed things to collapse into total chaos.

I mean, there's a wrong way to use the American military, and then there's a really, really wrong way to use the Amrican military. At least he's ered on the side of not completely dicking things up.
Well there really isn't much difference between Neo Lib ideology or Neo Con.....other than who is going to be in charge. Normally I would agree. But then putting in missile systems and giving the them those toys to play with pretty much changed up that idea. Along with the infrastructure nation building concept. Also going with a Foreign policy of these people will be willing to do Business with the West. Which was a losing concept from the get go.

Either way.....it looks like we told the Entire Planet we choose a side. We would rather choose the Sunni over the Shia. That's who we keep handing countries over too. Despite all that back-stabbing going on.
 

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I don't see that happening at all.
I am merely saying there is always the possibility, as such takeovers are the norm in the Middle East, and there will always be power hungry individuals around.
 
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