• This is a political forum that is non-biased/non-partisan and treats every persons position on topics equally. This debate forum is not aligned to any political party. In today's politics, many ideas are split between and even within all the political parties. Often we find ourselves agreeing on one platform but some topics break our mold. We are here to discuss them in a civil political debate. If this is your first visit to our political forums, be sure to check out the RULES. Registering for debate politics is necessary before posting. Register today to participate - it's free!
  • Welcome to our archives. No new posts are allowed here.

Economys of the ancient world

128shot

DP Veteran
Joined
Jul 19, 2005
Messages
1,258
Reaction score
31
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
How did they work? Like back in Roman and ancient greek times. How did one become wealthy? was this truely by just luck and connections?
 

Connecticutter

Active member
Joined
Jun 25, 2005
Messages
432
Reaction score
0
Location
New Haven, CT
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Conservative
Sorry - I'm not very knowledgeable on the topic. However, I'm guessing that there was a mix of command and free economies. Some things just haven't changed. I remember learning somewhere that real-estate mortgages were invented in babylonia.

A few things have changed though. There was slavery in Rome and Greece. Many ancient societies probably has class structures that today would seem ridiculous. However, I know that there are some examples of people who started down low and rose to the top.
 
Last edited:

Kandahar

Enemy Combatant
DP Veteran
Joined
Jul 20, 2005
Messages
20,688
Reaction score
7,319
Location
Washington, DC
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Liberal
128shot said:
How did they work? Like back in Roman and ancient greek times. How did one become wealthy? was this truely by just luck and connections?
In Ancient Greece, it probably varied from one state to another. Athens had a great meritocratic education system, and Sparta had a great meritocratic military. These probably allowed for some upward mobility.

Rome, from what I understand, had tremendous wealth disparity. There was a middle class, but it was limited to merchants, clergy, and other educated non-politicians. There was very little upward mobility; if you were born a slave, there wasn't much you could do about it.

As far as economic freedom goes, I think the best places would have been ancient China and ancient Iraq. Both were very individualist and had a legal system, so I can only assume that their economies were somewhat open and capitalistic.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom