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Drinking From the Cup of Bitterness and Hatred

Wehrwolfen

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By Aaron Goldstein
8.26.13


This wasn’t the dream of 50 years ago.

It is important that we commemorate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. Dr. King not only arguably delivered the greatest speech spoken on American soil, but his words were a critical turning point in the history of civil rights in America. When King said that he dreamt of the day that his children would be judged by the content of the character instead of the color of their skin, it was the point at which many white Americans began to rethink their views about blacks.

Yet half a century later, it is sadly and painfully apparent that Dr. King’s successors have outright ignored his inspiring words:

And that is something that I must say to my people who stand on the worn threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.​

Unfortunately, this country’s most prominent black leaders have spent many years drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. Their thirst shows no signs of satiation.

Some of these leaders were King’s contemporaries and on hand for the March on Washington. Georgia Congressman John Lewis, who also spoke at the March on Washington, would later sustain a fractured skull at the hands of Alabama State troopers when he led 600 marchers across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in March 1965.

Lewis however seems to possess little of King’s equanimity and has seen fit to liken his political opponents to George Wallace— the man who sent in the troopers to stop Lewis. Indeed, after 2008 GOP presidential candidate John McCain said Lewis was one of the three wisest people he knew, Lewis returned the favor by comparing him and Sarah Palin to Wallace. John McCain can be accused of many things. A segregationist George Wallace isn’t one of them.

In March 2010, during the height of the Obamacare debate on Capitol Hill, Lewis was one of a number of members of the Congressional Black Caucus who accused Tea Party activists of using a racial epithet against him. The late Andrew Breitbart offered $10,000 to the United Negro College Fund if videotape evidence could be produced to substantiate Lewis’ claims. There were no takers.

[Excerpt]

Read more:
The American Spectator : Drinking From the Cup of Bitterness and Hatred

In their haste to maintain the bitterness of the death of Martin Luther King Jr. race hustlers from the NAACP, Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, and their surrogate Obama have turned and perverted MLK's teachings into hate driven ideology.
 

TheDemSocialist

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By Aaron Goldstein
8.26.13


This wasn’t the dream of 50 years ago.

It is important that we commemorate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. Dr. King not only arguably delivered the greatest speech spoken on American soil, but his words were a critical turning point in the history of civil rights in America. When King said that he dreamt of the day that his children would be judged by the content of the character instead of the color of their skin, it was the point at which many white Americans began to rethink their views about blacks.

Yet half a century later, it is sadly and painfully apparent that Dr. King’s successors have outright ignored his inspiring words:

And that is something that I must say to my people who stand on the worn threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.​

Unfortunately, this country’s most prominent black leaders have spent many years drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. Their thirst shows no signs of satiation.

Some of these leaders were King’s contemporaries and on hand for the March on Washington. Georgia Congressman John Lewis, who also spoke at the March on Washington, would later sustain a fractured skull at the hands of Alabama State troopers when he led 600 marchers across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in March 1965.

Lewis however seems to possess little of King’s equanimity and has seen fit to liken his political opponents to George Wallace— the man who sent in the troopers to stop Lewis. Indeed, after 2008 GOP presidential candidate John McCain said Lewis was one of the three wisest people he knew, Lewis returned the favor by comparing him and Sarah Palin to Wallace. John McCain can be accused of many things. A segregationist George Wallace isn’t one of them.

In March 2010, during the height of the Obamacare debate on Capitol Hill, Lewis was one of a number of members of the Congressional Black Caucus who accused Tea Party activists of using a racial epithet against him. The late Andrew Breitbart offered $10,000 to the United Negro College Fund if videotape evidence could be produced to substantiate Lewis’ claims. There were no takers.

[Excerpt]

Read more:
The American Spectator : Drinking From the Cup of Bitterness and Hatred

In their haste to maintain the bitterness of the death of Martin Luther King Jr. race hustlers from the NAACP, Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, and their surrogate Obama have turned and perverted MLK's teachings into hate driven ideology.
:doh
No....
 

CRUE CAB

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Greatest speech ever?
Clearly you never heard FDR or JKF speak.
 

Wehrwolfen

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Greatest speech ever?
Clearly you never heard FDR or JKF speak.
If you are referring to me, I can say yes. I was alive and actually heard FDR speak on the radio, and I voted for JFK back in the day. In fact I enlisted into the military just prior to the election of JFK. Apparently you weren't and certainly refuse to admit that Pres. Eisenhower was instrumental in the furtherance of Civil Rights before JFK and LBJ.
 

Redress

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Holy ****, my irony meter assploded when I read the thread title!
 

Wehrwolfen

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When you measure the advances of Civil Rights in the 50's and how strongly those of the Democratic Party fought against integration of the Military and schools by blowing up churches and killing black people in the name of the Democratic Party. Then the deaths of Civil Rights members by the KKK (Democrats all). Yet, today we see that racism has changed it's source from Democrats and the KKK to Democrats and the NAACP.

Listening to the race hustlers using Martin Luther King's anniversary of his Great speech on August 16, 1963 to spew more racism.
See:

Shocking Racism At Sharpton’s MLK Anniversary Rally | The ...

www.robertsreportonline.com/news/...racism-at...mlk-anniversary-rally

Shocking Racism At Sharpton’s MLK Anniversary ... They stated that holding such a rally on the 47th anniversary of Dr. King’s “I have a dream” speech ...

We've come a long way but the road has not come to and end, especially when we've let the wolves among the sheep.
 
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