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Definition of majority in American Politics?

Defintion of majority in American Politics.


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Just because Clownboy and I have been derailing a different thread, I feel it may be easier to settle here. In American politics does getting a majority mean to get over 50% of the total vote or does it mean just to have more votes than any other candidate? Should be a pretty simple question.
 

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Just because Clownboy and I have been derailing a different thread, I feel it may be easier to settle here. In American politics does getting a majority mean to get over 50% of the total vote or does it mean just to have more votes than any other candidate? Should be a pretty simple question.

It is not that simple. Some places have run offs for those that do not make the 50% plus 1.
Others it is whoever receives the most votes.
So in a race with more than 3 candidates, it can easily be someone receiving 30 % (approx) of the total vote.
 

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It is not that simple. Some places have run offs for those that do not make the 50% plus 1.
Others it is whoever receives the most votes.
So in a race with more than 3 candidates, it can easily be someone receiving 30 % (approx) of the total vote.

I'm not talking about who should win an election. I'm talking about what qualifies as a majority of votes. In the U.S. it is very possible to win an election without 50% of the votes, but does that qualify as a majority is the question.
 

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Just because Clownboy and I have been derailing a different thread, I feel it may be easier to settle here. In American politics does getting a majority mean to get over 50% of the total vote or does it mean just to have more votes than any other candidate? Should be a pretty simple question.

No need for a poll

Simple Definition of majority
: a number that is greater than half of a total
: a number of votes that is more than half of the total number

Majority | Definition of Majority by Merriam-Webster
 

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It is not that simple. Some places have run offs for those that do not make the 50% plus 1.
Others it is whoever receives the most votes.
So in a race with more than 3 candidates, it can easily be someone receiving 30 % (approx) of the total vote.

Thats called a plurality
 

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I'm not talking about who should win an election. I'm talking about what qualifies as a majority of votes. In the U.S. it is very possible to win an election without 50% of the votes, but does that qualify as a majority is the question.

Many countries have more than the 2 party State that the US has.
A true majority would be 50% plus 1, IMHO.
If that entails run off elections in a riding(Canada) then I am fine with that.
 

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Many countries have more than the 2 party State that the US has.
A true majority would be 50% plus 1, IMHO.
If that entails run off elections in a riding(Canada) then I am fine with that.

I agree. I'm not discussing voting systems or how candidates should be elected. Just the definition of the word "majority."
 

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I'm not talking about who should win an election. I'm talking about what qualifies as a majority of votes. In the U.S. it is very possible to win an election without 50% of the votes, but does that qualify as a majority is the question.

yes, very often, a plurality wins the election, not a majority.

in a race between 2 people, a majority is necessary.
in a race with more than 2 people, a plurality will win
 

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No a majority is over 50%, if someone wins but with less than 50% its a plurality

If you read what I posted to Anagram you would see I agreed.
I offered up what many people think, no more no less than that.
While I can be damned simple at time, the definition of majority is within my grasp.
 

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Just because Clownboy and I have been derailing a different thread, I feel it may be easier to settle here. In American politics does getting a majority mean to get over 50% of the total vote or does it mean just to have more votes than any other candidate? Should be a pretty simple question.

It is a simple question. 1 more vote than 50% is a majority. Getting more votes than any other candidate is a plurality.
 

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It is not that simple. Some places have run offs for those that do not make the 50% plus 1.
Others it is whoever receives the most votes.
So in a race with more than 3 candidates, it can easily be someone receiving 30 % (approx) of the total vote.

Which would be a plurality, not a majority.
 

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The technical term is n > 50%.

As another pointed out, a plurality and majority are not the synonyms people confuse them to be.
 
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It is also called a majority of votes cast by many.

I don't know anybody familiar with the English language that would call that a majority.
 

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Just because Clownboy and I have been derailing a different thread, I feel it may be easier to settle here. In American politics does getting a majority mean to get over 50% of the total vote or does it mean just to have more votes than any other candidate? Should be a pretty simple question.

"Majority" usually means 50% plus one. A plurality is when someone wins but has less than 50% of the votes cast, usually as a result of three or more candidates. the operational meaning of 'plurality' is the difference in vote count as in "he had a plurality of over 20%" meaning he beat the nearest candidate by that much.
 

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You'll notice that nowhere in the constitution is the word "plurality" used (those fellows were pretty much caught up on the English language). It's always majority. In fact show me where any state uses plurality in their primary rules. They say instead, must attain 50%+1, or over 50%.

When the contest is between two contestants, the majority winner will have over 50%. However, there are other parties in presidential elections, and cases like the primaries where there are more than two contestants. The majority winner is the one who gets the greatest number.
 

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Majority=50% +1
 

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You'll notice that nowhere in the constitution is the word "plurality" used (those fellows were pretty much caught up on the English language). It's always majority. In fact show me where any state uses plurality in their primary rules. They say instead, must attain 50%+1, or over 50%.

When the contest is between two contestants, the majority winner will have over 50%. However, there are other parties, and cases like the primaries where there are more than two contestants. The majority winner is the one who gets the greatest number.

And the Constitution is making a distinction between more than 50% and just having the most votes. For example:

and if no Person have a Majority, then from the five highest on the List the said House shall in like Manner choose the President

What do you think that means, if not that you need more than 50% of the electors or else the House shall choose the President?
 

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It is also called a majority of votes cast by many.

Afraid not. If I were to have reported that so-and-so candidate had won by a 'majority' when they had 30% of the vote I would likely have been taken to task by an editor. I know a lot of people use the word as a plurality, but it is as wrong as saying a car careened across the road and crashed. "Careen" means to lay a sailboat on its side, while carom is what billiard balls do bouncing off the cushion.

While we're at it, I need to get this off my chest. "His business is floundering". Not unless he's selling fish because that's what flounder is, what they mean to say is "founder" as a boat in a storm with no helm.

There, I feel much better
 

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You'll notice that nowhere in the constitution is the word "plurality" used (those fellows were pretty much caught up on the English language). It's always majority. In fact show me where any state uses plurality in their primary rules. They say instead, must attain 50%+1, or over 50%.

When the contest is between two contestants, the majority winner will have over 50%. However, there are other parties in presidential elections, and cases like the primaries where there are more than two contestants. The majority winner is the one who gets the greatest number.

Here's another part of the Constitution (Amendment 12) that specifically distinguishes from having the most votes and having a majority.
The person having the greatest Number of votes for President, shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed; and if no person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as President, the House of Representatives shall choose immediately, by ballot, the President.
 

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You'll notice that nowhere in the constitution is the word "plurality" used (those fellows were pretty much caught up on the English language). It's always majority. In fact show me where any state uses plurality in their primary rules. They say instead, must attain 50%+1, or over 50%.

When the contest is between two contestants, the majority winner will have over 50%. However, there are other parties in presidential elections, and cases like the primaries where there are more than two contestants. The majority winner is the one who gets the greatest number.



So, what happens when a congressional candidate wins with 40% against two candidates? is he declared a winner even though he does not have a majority?
 

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I don't know anybody familiar with the English language that would call that a majority.

I live in a multi party State- let me clarify it- a simple majority.
And if you read back, you will see how I define majority. 50 % plus 1
 

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Here's another part of the Constitution (Amendment 12) that specifically distinguishes from having the most votes and having a majority.

So, tell me then, why didn't they use "plurality"? At all. It's nowhere in the constitution. Maybe because the British, you know, where the language came to us from, use "majority". They modify what type of majority by using "absolute majority", or "relative majority". Majority itself meaning simply: the greater number.
 
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