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David Myatt on the concept of the Aryan duel or trial by combat

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Aryan law is the basis of the legal code of an Aryan society: that is, the basis of "law and order" in an Aryan society.

All currently existing societies are not only un-Aryan, they are anti-Aryan: that is, they suppress and have outlawed Aryan law and the Aryan culture on which it is based.

Aryan law is the basis for true freedom. Any society which is based upon, which uses, any other type of law is a tyrannical society.


The Principles of Aryan Law


I: The first, and fundamental, principle of Aryan law is that there are only honourable and dishonourable deeds, with dishonourable deeds being the concern of Aryan laws. That is, there is no concept of "crime" as "crime" is now understood in modern societies. Aryans laws thus define what is dis-honourable.

II: The second principle of Aryan law is that the penalties for committing dishonourable deeds are always compensatory, and never punitive, and involve only: (1) exile of those found guilty of dishonourable conduct; (2) compensation by the guilty person, in goods, or money, of the victim of the dishonourable deed, or of the family/relatives of the victim. If the person found guilty of having committed a dishonourable deed or deeds has little or no goods or money then they can give their labour for a specified period.

That is, there is no such thing as "imprisonment" or confinement of those found guilty of committing a dishonourable deed or deeds. There is also no such thing as "the death penalty" just as individuals accused of some deed or deeds - whatever the nature of that deed or deeds - cannot be held in custody, in confinement, awaiting trial.

Exile can be of two kinds: Greater Exile, where the person is exiled from the homeland for the rest of their life; or Lesser Exile, where the person is exiled for a period of three years.

Someone who has been exiled is an outlaw: outside the protection of Aryan law.

III: The third principle of Aryan law is that an accusation of dishonourable conduct - that is, of someone doing a deed which has been defined, in law, as dishonourable - must be made: (a) in person by either the victim of such a deed, or by the family/relatives of the victim; and (b) in public, in front of several witnesses.

That is, Aryan law is concerned only with dishonourable actions between individuals: with deeds which are actually done in real life and which affect an individual or individuals. Thus, there is not and can never be, in Aryan law, (a) any prosecution of a person by some "Institution" or Government or officials of these; (b) any prosecution for something which has not been committed; (c) any such thing as a dishonourable deed committed against some "Institution" or some "Government".

There is thus no such thing as "conspiracy" in Aryan law, just as individuals cannot be prosecuted for "intending" to commit a dishonourable deed.

What must be proved in an Aryan Court of Law is that the accused did do the dishonourable deed they are accused of. An intention to commit such a deed is not and never can be contrary to Aryan law.


IV: The fourth principle of Aryan law is that every individual has the right to defend themselves, their family, and those to whom that individual has sworn, before witnesses, an Oath of Loyalty, and the right to use lethal force in such defence.

Should an individual or individual be harmed or injured in such defence, then it is the right, of that individual to seek redress from the individual who has harmed or injured them. Should an individual be killed in such defence, then the family/relatives of that individual have the right of redress.

This redress consists either of accusing, in public, the person of dishonourable conduct, or of a direct challenge to a duel or a trial by combat.


V: The fifth principle of Aryan law is that disputes between individual - involving injury or any other matter - may be settled through either a duel between the individuals involved, or by a trial by combat between those involved.

That is, it is a fundamental right, and duty, of the individual to be responsible for themselves, their family, and those given an Oath of Loyalty, and to seek, if necessary, personal vengeance and satisfaction, through a duel or trial by combat. Justice, for Aryan law, is a matter of honour and of being seen to be fair.

What matters, what is important, for Aryan law is the personal honour of the individual and the right, and duty, of the individual to defend their own honour. This right and duty cannot be taken away from the individual by, for example, the State, for that would be contrary to Aryan law, a denial of the freedom of the individual based as this freedom is on personal honour, and personal responsibility to defend that honour.

Aryan law does not recognize, and is totally opposed to, the concept of the State, the Government, or one person (such as a Monarch) intervening in matters of law, with individuals looking to such a State, such a Government or such a person, for either "justice" or to appropriate blame.

Aryan law thus accepts that a duel, or a trial by combat, is an honourable way of settling disputes between individuals.


In the matter of duels and trial by combat, Aryan law specifies that there must be an independent referee, Umpire or judge, at least two independent witnesses, and that such duels and trials be conducted in an honourable way according to custom. Aryan law affirms that should any person be injured or killed in such a duel or trial by combat then that is their own responsibility. That is, Aryan law considers such duels and such combats - when performed honourably according to custom - as honourable deeds.

VI: The sixth principle of Aryan law is that anyone publicly accused of a dishonourable deed or deeds has a right to either challenge the person making the accusation to a duel, or of accepting a trial in an Aryan Court of Law.

Should the person so making the accusation agree to a duel, then the matter is considered settled, according to Aryan law, by the outcome of that duel provided it is done in an honourable way.


VII: The seventh principle of Aryan law is that an individual accused of any dishonourable deed or deeds, who has accepted a trial in an Aryan Court of Law, can either elect to have their case heard, in public, with witnesses called, or elect for a public trial by combat between the accused and a member or relative of the family of the person who has made the accusation.

It is up to the Court to ensure that such a combat is fair: that is, that the two combatants are fairly evenly matched in skill and physical strength.

If the accused accepts a public Court, then they are bound by the verdict of that Court. That is, there is no appeal. Thus, if the accused is found guilty, then they must accept exile, or pay whatever compensation is demanded by the Court. According to Aryan law, failure to pay such compensation within the time specified by the Court means the immediate exile of the person, with the type of exile being decided by the Court.


VIII: The eighth principle of Aryan law is that a public trial involves an accusation made by one individual against another individual before a Jury of twelve honourable individuals, with their being a presiding Judge. It is the duty of the Jury to judge the case on the evidence of independent witnesses, and after hearing arguments from the accused and the person who has brought the charge. The accusation must be supported by the evidence of independent witnesses: if there is no such evidence, the case is dismissed. It is the duty of the Judge to pass sentence according to the principles of Aryan law: that is, either exile, or compensation.

Thus, according to Aryan law, the only people who may prosecute a case, and who may defend an accusation, are either the two individuals involved - accused and accuser - or members/relatives of their families. That is, someone accused of some dishonourable deed or deeds must either defend themselves in such a Court, or have a member/relative of their family do this. The same applies for the person bringing or making the accusation: they must either present their own case, or have a member/relative of their family present it.

It is also the duty of the person who believes a dishonourable deed has been done to them - or the members/relatives of their family - to find and accuse the person responsible, if such a person has not been seen and identified during the deed, and to find any witnesses to the deed.

Aryan law thus does not accept the concept of "professional lawyers" or "solicitors", regarding this concept as dishonourable and a negation of the liberty of the individual.

An independent witness is defined in Aryan law as a person who is not a member or relative of either the person accused or of the injured party, and who is not bound by an Oath of Allegiance to either the accused or the injured party, or to any member of their families.

Both the Judge and Jurors at such a trial must also be independent by the same criteria.


IX: The ninth principle of Aryan law is that if a person who has suffered a dishonourable deed according to Aryan law has no living family members or relatives, then it is the duty of an honourable person in the community to act on their behalf, and so find and accuse the person they believe is responsible if that honourable person sees such a deed committed, or sincerely and justly believes that a dishonourable deed has been committed.

The person who so begins to act is bound by the rules of Aryan law: that is, they must present the case themselves, and can be challenged to a duel or a trial by combat by the person they accuse.
 

Old and wise

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Man, you are a complete screwball. Don't you ever give up?
Your Aryan society is dead, history. :thumbdown
 
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Old and wise said:
Man, you are a complete screwball. Don't you ever give up?
Your Aryan society is dead, history. :thumbdown
You would love that to be the case wouldn`t you?
Too bad-we never went away.
 

teacher

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Old and wise said:
Man, you are a complete screwball. Don't you ever give up?
Your Aryan society is dead, history. :thumbdown
This is not the behavior that is going to bring little Ayran into the fold.

How about a song?

Ayran sind mein fruend und er es schon.
Veleight dien gehirn es zu kliene.
Wir must mit Ayran immer hoflich bin.
Zu viel beir und ich habe grosse kopfshmerzen.
Wo ist der banhof? Ich wies nicht.
Bitte Old and Wise, gibst Ayran dien ziet.
Er ist nicht schlect.
Wo ist mein Affe?
Ich wohne im der kerker.
 
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