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Culture vs. Race

Velvet Elvis

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Despite my aversion to label people I know by race/sex/etc., for sake of this thread I have a "black friend." He and I have downed many a beer together discussing various things, including race relations. Three weeks ago, he turned me on to this guy on YouTube. "Dude, you gotta listen to this guy! He totally nails it. There needs to be more dudes like him."

Now, I admit that I was a little uncomfortable watching it, but eventually watched quite a few of this guy's videos. Despite some of his over-the-top antics, a lot of what he says makes sense to me. Makes sense to my friend, as well. When I read the comments to the videos, it seems he's a "love him or hate him" kind of YouTuber.


I don't want to focus on the speaker, as much as the message. My question is: what's wrong with it? Is (or should) this something that white people can be comfortable agreeing with? Would our society be better or worse if more people were honest, and spoke out about culture, and not simply race? Why are the problems this guy discusses so hard to see...or correct? Why won't our government acknowledge the difference between culture and race?
 

Captain Adverse

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I don't want to focus on the speaker, as much as the message. My question is: what's wrong with it? Is (or should) this something that white people can be comfortable agreeing with? Would our society be better or worse if more people were honest, and spoke out about culture, and not simply race? Why are the problems this guy discusses so hard to see...or correct? Why won't our government acknowledge the difference between culture and race?

I agree with both the gentleman in your video and Dr. Thomas Sowell.

While there is no arguing that Racism no longer exists, because it is evident among members of all races; the problems leading to a failure of Black Americans to succeed within our country lie within the current Black sub-culture that has it's roots in the 60's welfare state.


My grandfather dug ditches and my grandmother worked in garment district sweat shops. He was still able to complete a medical degree and become a physician long before Brown vs. Board of Education changed the educational landscape. It's all about how you view yourself in society, and what you are willing to do to achieve your goals...to see a better place and work towards it for yourself and your children.

That's the ideology of Dr. King...not the ideology of the thug life today.
 
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Mithrae

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While there is no arguing that Racism no longer exists, because it is evident among members of all races; the problems leading to a failure of Black Americans to succeed within our country lie within the current Black sub-culture that has it's roots in the 60's welfare state.

I have to disagree entirely on the emphasised part: For as long as people have lived in poverty with little or no hope of improvement, they have found ways to justify and dignify their positions and find some kind of virtue in it. Quite a lot of the New Testament is a good example of this. Arguably that's a good thing, but if and when it becomes an established cultural norm, the consequences can be crippling even when the opportunity for change arrives. In much of the US, certainly into the 1960s and probably some decades beyond, little (or limited) hope of improvement was the norm for black people, and to greater or lesser extents it's often historically been the case for the lower class of any society. Some interesting comparisons and contrasts might be made between 'black culture' and 'redneck culture,' for example.

https://www.quora.com/How-much-does...o-culture-have-in-common-with-redneck-culture

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_of_poverty
 
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