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Connectivity gene a precursor to Intelligence?

Hdreamz

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Research into the human genome has shown repeatedly that many genes in the homosapien sp are also found in many other sp, ranging from dogs,cats,mice,chimps and dolphins. One of the most intriguing aspects discovered were the duplicated copies of various genes which have been considered junk or back-up DNA for many years.

Recent studies have shown though the human brain contains upwards of 100 billion neurons, 40% more than our closest cousins in Bonobo's and Chimpanzee's it is not necessarily the number of neurons that gives us the conscious condition. Many have said alternatively it is the connectivity of the neurons that is the difference between our sp. Until recently this couldn't be tested but with the discovery of the gene regulating the connectivity of neurons, +SRGAP2C, we can now examine this in more detail.

+SRGAP2C is replicated 4 times in the human genome on chromosome 1. In most other animals it only appears once such as chimps, mice, dogs and cats. Strangely in Dolphins it appears twice but the 2nd replication is incomplete and higher up the 1st chromosome.

The gene once isolated was spliced into mouse Dna and showed that with the enhanced copies of the gene, the mice neurons increased their connectivity and spinal protrusions by 42%. Currently tests are beginning to grow mice with the increased neural connectivity to adulthood to observe behaviour for changes.

With the amount gleamed from the studies like that of the Planck Institute of chimp/human behavior and testing in recent years it has become ever more obvious that we are more a result of human culture than biology, though the discovery of this gene may help us to understand how we are able to have that culture in the first place....

SRGAP2C.jpg
SRGAP2C   2.jpg

Below are the papers citing these breakthroughs.

Evolution of Human-Specific Neural SRGAP2 Genes by Incomplete Segmental Duplication.
http://www.umich.edu/~zhanglab/clubPaper/08_10_2012.pdf

Inhibition of SRGAP2 Function by Its Human-Specific Paralogs Induces Neoteny during Spine Maturation
http://www.scripps.edu/polleux/Polle..._withsuppl.pdf
 

Gathomas88

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+SRGAP2C is replicated 4 times in the human genome on chromosome 1. In most other animals it only appears once such as chimps, mice, dogs and cats. Strangely in Dolphins it appears twice but the 2nd replication is incomplete and higher up the 1st chromosome.

The gene once isolated was spliced into mouse Dna and showed that with the enhanced copies of the gene, the mice neurons increased their connectivity and spinal protrusions by 42%. Currently tests are beginning to grow mice with the increased neural connectivity to adulthood to observe behaviour for changes.
Anyone else think of the movie "The Secret of NIMH" when they read this? :lol:
 

Fenton

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All animals have Consciousness but the ability to recognize the profound signifigance of our own being lies exclusively with us.

Now our environment affecting our intelligence ? I don't buy that 100% but what those articles made me think of was how they pick Border Collies, the smartest dog in the world supposely, out of the litter to become herding dogs.

When the puppies can just walk they take the lot into a sheeps pen, bring in a sheep and tie it up in the corner. They then release the puppies on the other side of the pen.

Out of a litter of 9 maybe three or four will instinctively move towards the sheep. Those puppies are marked and kept exclusively for the purpose of herding.

The rest are euthanized, ground up into a fine meal and fed to the sheep.....j/k.

They're sold off as pets. But even a pet Border Collie will instinctively try to herd small children and other house pets.

They nip the back of the childs ankle which makes them a poor choice for a pet...if you have kids.
 

Hdreamz

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It depends on how many kids you have, could be useful for a large family on a day out :)

We always had large dogs, boerboels, Alsatians and a great Dane growing up though i wouldnt have minded a tri-colour Collie.
 

Fenton

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It depends on how many kids you have, could be useful for a large family on a day out :)


We always had large dogs, boerboels, Alsatians and a great Dane growing up though i wouldnt have minded a tri-colour Collie.
My grandfather raised Border Collies but he had a huge yard, over an acre and usually kept at least 3.

I remember from time to time there would be a Dog that was exceptionally intelligent, above and beyond the normal high intelligence that is innate to the breed.

I also remember my kid brother getting hurt when he was 3 and the Collies surrounding him and barking and snapping away anyone until my grandfather showed up.
 

csbrown28

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My grandfather raised Border Collies but he had a huge yard, over an acre and usually kept at least 3.

I remember from time to time there would be a Dog that was exceptionally intelligent, above and beyond the normal high intelligence that is innate to the breed.

I also remember my kid brother getting hurt when he was 3 and the Collies surrounding him and barking and snapping away anyone until my grandfather showed up.
That reminds me of a story...My brother, when he was three, crawled out of his crib and then out a ground level window (my parents lived on a Marine base in HI at the time). Well he wandered off and our German Shepherd jumped out the window and followed. When the base MP's found him about a mile away, the dog wouldn't let them anywhere near him. That had to coax him up to the door of the jeep and reach down and pull him through the window....lol

The dog came home soon after....:)
 
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