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Clinton video spotlights Trump products made outside US

Objective Voice

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I was wondering when/if someone from the Clinton campaign would be smart/daring enough to try this especially in the wake of Trump Wine or Trump Steaks.

Two Clinton staffers decided to test Donald Trump's "Make America Great Again" mantra and did a little shopping at Trump Tower. What did they find? Not one item sold at Trump Tower was "Made In America".

Now, before anyone throws dirt on this, I'm fully aware that all these staffers purchased were knick-knacks and a few trinkets. Furthermore, I'm also aware of Donald Trump's primary argument were trade is concerned is that much of what consumers buy are products made outside the U.S. and sold domestically at retail. So, this little experiment at trying to undercut him backfires in a way. That is until you stop and think about the underlying theme of Trump's campaign which is "Put America First!" Still, I can see the folly in this experiment, but for some this might make a difference in how they vote.

For those who don't quite understand how merchandising works, Trump could easily claim that as a merchandiser he's only doing what every other merchant does. But for alot of people...Independent voters...who may potentially swing either way for or against Donald Trump...the optics aren't good on this. Why?

Because the expectation is "If Donald Trump truly believes in putting America first and putting Americans back to work, shouldn't he start that process within his own business ventures?" If he's unwilling to do that - to sell products that are, in fact, "Made in America," then how can we take him seriously when he goes around proclaiming to "Make America Great Again" in conjunction with claiming he'll bringing jobs back to America through free trade agreements that benefit America more?

For me, this is no big deal since I wasn't voting for the Donald anyway. (Still weighing heavily towards a write-in candidate.) For others, however, this could be a big deal especially if Hillary's campaign starts hitting him hard on both false claims of Trump merchandise not being Donald Trump's or nothing for sale in the stores at his hotels/motels/golf clubs are "Made in America" (assuming other Clinton staffers get smart and try this experiment everywhere Trump's name appears on buildings). That won't look good for him at all.
 
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SMTA

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I was wondering when/if someone from the Clinton campaign would be smart/daring enough to try this especially in the wake of Trump Wine or Trump Steaks.

Two Clinton staffers decided to test Donald Trump's "Make America Great Again" mantra and did a little shopping at Trump Tower. What did they find? Not one item sold at Trump Tower was "Made In America".

Now, before anyone throws dirt on this, I'm fully aware that all these staffers purchased were knick-knacks and a few trinkets. Furthermore, I'm also aware of Donald Trump's primary argument were trade is concerned is that much of what consumers buy are products made outside the U.S. and sold domestically at retail. So, this little experiment at trying to undercut him backfires in a way. That is until you stop and think about the underlying theme of Trump's campaign which is "Put America First!" Still, I can see the folly in this experiment, but for some this might make a difference in how they vote.

For those who don't quite understand how merchandising works, Trump could easily claim that as a merchandiser he's only doing what every other merchant does. But for alot of people...Independent voters...who may potentially swing either way for or against Donald Trump...the optics aren't good on this. Why?

Because the expectation is "If Donald Trump truly believes in putting America first and putting Americans back to work, shouldn't he start that process within his own business ventures?" If he's unwilling to do that - to sell products that are, in fact, "Made in America," then how can we take him seriously when he goes around proclaiming to "Make America Great Again" in conjunction with claiming he'll bringing jobs back to America through free trade agreements that benefit America more?

For me, this is no big deal since I wasn't voting for the Donald anyway. (Still weighing heavily towards a write-in candidate.) For others, however, this could be a big deal especially if Hillary's campaign starts hitting him hard on both false claims of Trump merchandise not being Donald Trump's or nothing for sale in the stores at his hotels/motels/golf clubs are "Made in America" (assuming other Clinton staffers get smart and try this experiment everywhere Trump's name appears on buildings). That won't look good for him at all.

The lesson here is Trump's reoccurring theme - he lies about everything that he says.
 

Cardinal

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I was wondering when/if someone from the Clinton campaign would be smart/daring enough to try this especially in the wake of Trump Wine or Trump Steaks.

Two Clinton staffers decided to test Donald Trump's "Make America Great Again" mantra and did a little shopping at Trump Tower. What did they find? Not one item sold at Trump Tower was "Made In America".

Now, before anyone throws dirt on this, I'm fully aware that all these staffers purchased were knick-knacks and a few trinkets. Furthermore, I'm also aware of Donald Trump's primary argument were trade is concerned is that much of what consumers buy are products made outside the U.S. and sold domestically at retail. So, this little experiment at trying to undercut him backfires in a way. That is until you stop and think about the underlying theme of Trump's campaign which is "Put America First!" Still, I can see the folly in this experiment, but for some this might make a difference in how they vote.

For those who don't quite understand how merchandising works, Trump could easily claim that as a merchandiser he's only doing what every other merchant does. But for alot of people...Independent voters...who may potentially swing either way for or against Donald Trump...the optics aren't good on this. Why?

Because the expectation is "If Donald Trump truly believes in putting America first and putting Americans back to work, shouldn't he start that process within his own business ventures?" If he's unwilling to do that - to sell products that are, in fact, "Made in America," then how can we take him seriously when he goes around proclaiming to "Make America Great Again" in conjunction with claiming he'll bringing jobs back to America through free trade agreements that benefit America more?

For me, this is no big deal since I wasn't voting for the Donald anyway. (Still weighing heavily towards a write-in candidate.) For others, however, this could be a big deal especially if Hillary's campaign starts hitting him hard on both false claims of Trump merchandise not being Donald Trump's or nothing for sale in the stores at his hotels/motels/golf clubs are "Made in America" (assuming other Clinton staffers get smart and try this experiment everywhere Trump's name appears on buildings). That won't look good for him at all.

I'm dubious of the premise in Trump's position which is that in order to stay competitive he is required to have his products made outside of the United States. Since he is a consummate liar I am automatically predisposed to distrust this premise. All you really need is just a couple good examples of successful businesses in the United States that does its manufacturing domestically. Are there genuinely none at all?
 

chuckiechan

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Make America great again is not about bring back the trinket industry.

It is about adjusting trade policy. A perfect trade balance is zero. We buy as much as we ship.

China is cheaper because, among other things:
Undervalued currency designed to give Chinese products a discounted cost coming in.
Artificial trade barriers in China and other receiving countries
Transfer of technology deals by China
Theft of patents and intellectual property.

We have not had a leadership willing to address this in 25 years. This "problem" is a direct assault on American jobs and profitability. Sure, some are winning, but more are losing.

For example:
U.S. Steel accuses China of stealing trade secrets - Apr. 27, 2016
 

cabse5

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The lesson here is Trump's reoccurring theme - he lies about everything that he says.
No, Trump doesn't lie. The SECOND PRONG of Trump's 'bringing more manufacturing to the US' is his vying for cheaper labor in the US.

(1)Give manufacturers further incentives to come back to the US.
(2)Keep the costs of those manufacturing jobs lower so manufacturing products will be sold through out the world. Then loop back to 1.
 

chuckiechan

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No, Trump doesn't lie. The SECOND PRONG of Trump's 'bringing more manufacturing to the US' is his vying for cheaper labor in the US.

(1)Give manufacturers further incentives to come back to the US.
(2)Keep the costs of those manufacturing jobs lower so manufacturing products will be sold through out the world. Then loop back to 1.

How is he going to keep wages low? Open the borders? Grant amnesty and citizenship? Take a cut?
 

SMTA

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No, Trump doesn't lie. The SECOND PRONG of Trump's 'bringing more manufacturing to the US' is his vying for cheaper labor in the US.

(1)Give manufacturers further incentives to come back to the US.
(2)Keep the costs of those manufacturing jobs lower so manufacturing products will be sold through out the world. Then loop back to 1.

1. March 30: Trump claims MSNBC edited their released version of his interview with Chris Matthews in which Trump stumbled on abortion: “You really ought to hear the whole thing. I mean, this is a long convoluted question. This was a long discussion, and they just cut it out. And, frankly, it was extremely — it was really convoluted.” Nope; that was a lie.

2. March 29: Trump lies that Wisconsin’s effective unemployment rate is 20%, saying, ""What? Is it 20 percent? Effective or regular? I mean just -- effective unemployment rate, 20 percent. Hey, this is out of the big book." According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, The U-3 official unemployment rate in Wisconsin was 4.6 percent in 2015; Wisconsin’s U-6 rate for 2015 was 8.3 percent.

4. March 29: Trump alleged that when Michelle Fields "found out that there was a security camera, and that they had her on tape, all of a sudden that story changed." Absolutely untrue.

5. March 29: Trump said the Secret Service was worried about Fields, alleging, "She went through the Secret Service, she had a pen in her hand, which Service Service is not liking because they don't know what it is, whether it's a little bomb…” As Katie Pavlich of Townhall noted, “All reporters at campaign events, like regular attendees, go through Secret Service security before being allowed into a venue. The security is thorough, with a back check, wanding and a metal detector walk through. Fields wasn't carrying a knife, she was carrying a pen and if the Secret Service thought it was dangerous, they would have taken it from her at the security checkpoint before entering the room.”

6. March 27: Trump claims Cruz bought the rights to the ad featuring a nude Melania Trump: Debunked.

7. March 26: Trump lies, "There’s a tremendous tax that we pay when we (American businesses) go into China, whereas when China sells to us there’s no tax." China’s tariffs are higher than those imposed by the United States, but the Chinese exporters are taxed when they sell in the United States.

9. March 21: Trump lies, "Out of 67 counties (in Florida), I won 66, which is unprecedented. It's never happened before." Nope. In 2004, John Kerry won all 67 counties for the Democrats; in 2000, Al Gore won all 67 for the Democrats and. George W. Bush won all 67 for Republicans. In 1996, Bob Dole took 66 of 67 counties for the GOP primary and the 67th was a tie between Dole and Pat Buchanan in Washington County.

8. March 23: Trump accuses Cruz of coordinating with Super PAC in its ad featuring a nude Melania Trump. Tweeting, “Lyin' Ted Cruz denied that he had anything to do with the G.Q. model photo post of Melania. That's why we call him Lyin' Ted!” Debunked.

10. March 19: Trump said the 2016 federal omnibus spending bill "funds illegal immigrants coming in and through your border, right through Phoenix." Nope. The omnibus bill does not fund undocumented immigrants "coming in and through" the border; it funds the very agency tasked with keeping undocumented immigrants out, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Lyin' Donald: 101 Of Trump's Greatest Lies | Daily Wire

Here are just 10 for you - from one source - shall I continue?

Trump's lies just regarding Veteran groups alone are quite lengthy.
 

cabse5

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How is he going to keep wages low? Open the borders? Grant amnesty and citizenship? Take a cut?
Negotiate with unions for a lower wage or, if necessary, use non-union labor.
 

Fletch

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I was wondering when/if someone from the Clinton campaign would be smart/daring enough to try this especially in the wake of Trump Wine or Trump Steaks.

Two Clinton staffers decided to test Donald Trump's "Make America Great Again" mantra and did a little shopping at Trump Tower. What did they find? Not one item sold at Trump Tower was "Made In America".

Now, before anyone throws dirt on this, I'm fully aware that all these staffers purchased were knick-knacks and a few trinkets. Furthermore, I'm also aware of Donald Trump's primary argument were trade is concerned is that much of what consumers buy are products made outside the U.S. and sold domestically at retail. So, this little experiment at trying to undercut him backfires in a way. That is until you stop and think about the underlying theme of Trump's campaign which is "Put America First!" Still, I can see the folly in this experiment, but for some this might make a difference in how they vote.

For those who don't quite understand how merchandising works, Trump could easily claim that as a merchandiser he's only doing what every other merchant does. But for alot of people...Independent voters...who may potentially swing either way for or against Donald Trump...the optics aren't good on this. Why?

Because the expectation is "If Donald Trump truly believes in putting America first and putting Americans back to work, shouldn't he start that process within his own business ventures?" If he's unwilling to do that - to sell products that are, in fact, "Made in America," then how can we take him seriously when he goes around proclaiming to "Make America Great Again" in conjunction with claiming he'll bringing jobs back to America through free trade agreements that benefit America more?

For me, this is no big deal since I wasn't voting for the Donald anyway. (Still weighing heavily towards a write-in candidate.) For others, however, this could be a big deal especially if Hillary's campaign starts hitting him hard on both false claims of Trump merchandise not being Donald Trump's or nothing for sale in the stores at his hotels/motels/golf clubs are "Made in America" (assuming other Clinton staffers get smart and try this experiment everywhere Trump's name appears on buildings). That won't look good for him at all.

Of those 'trinkets' bought at Trump tower, did any of them have alternatives that are produced in America?

But more to the point, Trump is arguing that manufacturing be brought back to the US. That so many items are produced in other countries is the problem that Trump says he plans to address. (whether he can or not is another story). So there is no hypocrisy here.
 
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SMTA

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Negotiate with unions for a lower wage or, if necessary, use non-union labor.

Trump would not negotiate with unions - their contracts are with private companies.

Non-Union workers depend upon the state labor laws.

That makes you 0 for 2
 

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Of those 'trinkets' bought at Trump tower, did any of them have alternatives that are produced in America?

But more to the point, Trump is arguing that manufacturing be brought back to the US. That so many items are produced in other countries is the problem that Trump says he plans to address. (whether he can or not is another story). So there is no hypocrisy here.

Whether he can or not seems like a pretty relevant story.
 

Objective Voice

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Make America great again is not about bring back the trinket industry.

It is about adjusting trade policy. A perfect trade balance is zero. We buy as much as we ship.

Thing is no country can ever have a "zero balance" on trade. It's just not possible. Even if a country wanted to return to the days of isolationism like China was until the 20th Century, it would still export a small portion of its goods abroad and imported even less. Despite our nation's continuing expansion of a trade gap, we're still #2 worldwide in imports, #1 in imports and rank 5th in economic complexity per the Observatory of Economic Complexity (OEC). I suspect this non-existent zero-sum game in global trade will continue whether America were part of a broader global economy or not for one simple reason:

All countries either export their surplus production abroad or find ways to reduce the cost of labor.

It just so happens that America began this process on a much broader global scale in the 1980's through private equity, off-shoring and free trade agreements, such as NAFTA. That's unlikely to change any time soon.

China is cheaper because, among other things:

- Undervalued currency designed to give Chinese products a discounted cost coming in.
- Artificial trade barriers in China and other receiving countries
- Transfer of technology deals by China
- Theft of patents and intellectual property.

We have not had a leadership willing to address this in 25 years. This "problem" is a direct assault on American jobs and profitability. Sure, some are winning, but more are losing.

For example:
U.S. Steel accuses China of stealing trade secrets - Apr. 27, 2016

You won't get much of an argument from me on the above. China has been a major manipulator where fair trade between both nations is concerned. But we started that process long ago and we did it for greater profitability using the very mechanisms I mentioned above. If we truly wanted to reverse that, we'd have to start pulling back our manufacturing base. However, that would mean big investments in corporate expansion. Money's cheap now. So, that's not outside the realm of possibility except...

How do you keep the cost of labor down?

How would be our trade partners? Keep in mind we'd have to manipulate somebody's currency or cut into somebody's trade routes to do it. Who becomes our currency victim?
 

Objective Voice

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Whether he can or not seems like a pretty relevant story.

Plus, as I said, there's the optics of it. How does a guy whose bid for the presidency hinges in large part to increasing American production capacity when the merchandise in his shops aren't even "Made in America"? That's a problem Trump will have a very difficult time fixing.
 

Roadvirus

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The Hildabeast is just pissed because Trump reminded everyone where the Clinton Money Laundering Foundation gets some of it's "donations".
 

Objective Voice

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No, Trump doesn't lie. The SECOND PRONG of Trump's 'bringing more manufacturing to the US' is his vying for cheaper labor in the US.

(1)Give manufacturers further incentives to come back to the US.
(2)Keep the costs of those manufacturing jobs lower so manufacturing products will be sold through out the world. Then loop back to 1.

But how do you get there? From my perspective it means changing the tax code to benefit manufacturers, commercial banks and hedge fund investors. Would the America people go for that when the country is keenly aware of income inequality so widespread? Where labor cost are concerned, that's a tall order. I have an idea as to how that can be accomplished, but most people aren't gonna like it. Hell, I don't even like it! But in this age where the cost of living is already high, there aren't many options whereby the cost of labor can be substantially reduced to keep pace with China.
 
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cabse5

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But how do you get there? From my perspective it means changing the tax code to benefit manufacturers, commercial banks and hedge fund investors. Would the America people go for that when the country is keenly aware of income inequality so widespread? Where labor cost are concerned, that's a tall order. I have an idea as to how that can be accomplished, but most people aren't gonna like it. Hell, I don't even like it! But in this age where the cost of living is already high, there aren't many options whereby the cost of labor can be substantially reduced to keep pace with China.
Trump still believes in capitalism - resources go to the areas where the people most want them to go.

For there to be sustained manufacturing in the US, manufacturing will have to compete with the rest of the world. One of those areas where the US didn't compete with other manufacturing countries was the cost of labor. It cost too much to produce an American made product. For US manufacturers to recoup the cost of labor, to ever hope to sniff a profit, they have to charge more for the American made product than other countries. One of the reasons why American made manufacturing is no longer prevalent. This is the way of capitalism.

No other country is going to pay for a 'living wage' for Americans. Of course, the US could manufacture and sell exclusively to the US. Everyone in the US would be paying more for an American made product. There would be considerable inflation and some of the gains of a 'living wage' would be offset by the loses of inflation.

Some accuse Trump of lying with his 'trade war' stances to create more manufacturing jobs in the US. The first part of his stance to create more manufacturing in the US is the federal government providing 'inducements' for manufacturing to stay in the US. The second part would be other inducements making it easier for these American companies to maintain a profit while operating in the US. If manufacturing companies can't make a profit in the US, they will leave, they will avoid the law, again. Some don't want the second half of the inducements to manufacturing in the US. Great. The US will only be selling to the US and inflation will be rampant in the US and manufacturing jobs will decrease. The onus of this decrease of manufacturing jobs would be on those who don't wish for an American manufacturing company to make a profit while operating in America.

Are some supposedly proposing a 'living wage' for American workers while the federal government 'buys back' some labor costs of this 'living wage' to make the price tag of American made manufacturing cheaper to compete with the manufacturing price tags from the rest of the world? How much more would be added to the US federal deficit each year?
 
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cabse5

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Plus, as I said, there's the optics of it. How does a guy whose bid for the presidency hinges in large part to increasing American production capacity when the merchandise in his shops aren't even "Made in America"? That's a problem Trump will have a very difficult time fixing.
Trump's clothing companies can't make profits with American labor because the cost is too high for his clothing companies to compete with the rest of the world.
 

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Good Grief People, Trump would not even half of what he says he would, don't you people realize he is a Democrat?
 

coldjoint

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Good Grief People, Trump would not even half of what he says he would, don't you people realize he is a Democrat?

Maybe that is why he will recieve a large slice of the vote from the Democrats that want nothing to do with Hillary.
 

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Maybe that is why he will recieve a large slice of the vote from the Democrats that want nothing to do with Hillary.

And maybe pigs will grow wings and learn to fly, but both are highly unlikely.
 

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I was wondering when/if someone from the Clinton campaign would be smart/daring enough to try this especially in the wake of Trump Wine or Trump Steaks.

Two Clinton staffers decided to test Donald Trump's "Make America Great Again" mantra and did a little shopping at Trump Tower. What did they find? Not one item sold at Trump Tower was "Made In America".

Now, before anyone throws dirt on this, I'm fully aware that all these staffers purchased were knick-knacks and a few trinkets. Furthermore, I'm also aware of Donald Trump's primary argument were trade is concerned is that much of what consumers buy are products made outside the U.S. and sold domestically at retail. So, this little experiment at trying to undercut him backfires in a way. That is until you stop and think about the underlying theme of Trump's campaign which is "Put America First!" Still, I can see the folly in this experiment, but for some this might make a difference in how they vote.

For those who don't quite understand how merchandising works, Trump could easily claim that as a merchandiser he's only doing what every other merchant does. But for alot of people...Independent voters...who may potentially swing either way for or against Donald Trump...the optics aren't good on this. Why?

Because the expectation is "If Donald Trump truly believes in putting America first and putting Americans back to work, shouldn't he start that process within his own business ventures?" If he's unwilling to do that - to sell products that are, in fact, "Made in America," then how can we take him seriously when he goes around proclaiming to "Make America Great Again" in conjunction with claiming he'll bringing jobs back to America through free trade agreements that benefit America more?

For me, this is no big deal since I wasn't voting for the Donald anyway. (Still weighing heavily towards a write-in candidate.) For others, however, this could be a big deal especially if Hillary's campaign starts hitting him hard on both false claims of Trump merchandise not being Donald Trump's or nothing for sale in the stores at his hotels/motels/golf clubs are "Made in America" (assuming other Clinton staffers get smart and try this experiment everywhere Trump's name appears on buildings). That won't look good for him at all.

With the costs of doing business in the usa I'm not surprised or upset about it... particularly for freebie items.
Certain products I buy made in the usa simply because of the quality of stuff made overseas is dismal. One of those things is shoes. I have some NewBalance Crosstrainers I bought recently. I could have bought the ones made in China for 60-70$ like I did the last time.. only to have them fall apart (literally) after about 13-15 months. So this time I bought some made in USA. price.. 165$. I decide on each item whats worth the much greater price. some are some aren't. giveaway items and touristy stuff prob not.
 

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With the costs of doing business in the usa I'm not surprised or upset about it... particularly for freebie items.
Certain products I buy made in the usa simply because of the quality of stuff made overseas is dismal. One of those things is shoes. I have some NewBalance Crosstrainers I bought recently. I could have bought the ones made in China for 60-70$ like I did the last time.. only to have them fall apart (literally) after about 13-15 months. So this time I bought some made in USA. price.. 165$. I decide on each item whats worth the much greater price. some are some aren't. giveaway items and touristy stuff prob not.
My analogy: the US should sell Ferraris and leave the rest of the world to sell Tauruses? What's the US's market share when producing and selling the high-end goods?

Does this high-end production and manufacturing promote further manufacturing?
 
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