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Climate scientists' predictions proving accurate

livefree

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Predictions....

Are the predictions of climate scientists coming true?

Here's some predictions they made some years ago. Compare them to what is currently happening.

Meteorologists See Future of Increasingly Extreme Weather Events
Harder Rain, More Snow

(excerpt)
February 1, 2006 — While raising average global temperatures, climate change could also bring more snow, harder rain, or heat waves, meteorologists say. Computer models based on climate data from nine countries indicate every place on the planet will be hit with extreme weather events, including coastal storms and floods.

Global Warming Will Bring Violent Storms And Tornadoes, NASA Predicts
(excerpts)
ScienceDaily (Aug. 31, 2007) — NASA scientists have developed a new climate model that indicates that the most violent severe storms and tornadoes may become more common as Earth's climate warms. Previous climate model studies have shown that heavy rainstorms will be more common in a warmer climate, but few global models have attempted to simulate the strength of updrafts in these storms. The model developed at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies is the first to successfully simulate the observed difference in strength between land and ocean storms and is the first to estimate how the strength will change in a warming climate, including "severe thunderstorms" that also occur with significant wind shear and produce damaging winds at the ground.

The central and eastern areas of the United States are especially prone to severe storms and thunderstorms that arise when strong updrafts combine with horizontal winds that become stronger at higher altitudes. This combination produces damaging horizontal and vertical winds and is a major source of weather-related casualties. In the warmer climate simulation there is a small class of the most extreme storms with both strong updrafts and strong horizontal winds at higher levels that occur more often, and thus the model suggests that the most violent severe storms and tornadoes may become more common with warming.


There's the predictions....here's what actually happened...

2010 Produced Record Rainfall, and It Keeps Coming
University of California at Santa Barbara - Department of Geography
January 25, 2011
(excerpts)
Asia was literally swamped by last year’s monsoonal flooding, with Pakistan being hardest hit – over one-fifth of Pakistan's total land area ended up underwater, about 2,000 people were killed, and the floods directly affected about 20 million people. Torrential summer rains killed over 800 people and displaced millions in China. In May 2010, Poland's Prime Minister described the country’s flooding as “the worst natural disaster in the nation's history.” Ongoing floods that have ravaged Australia's northeast and swamped a major city in recent months could be the country's most expensive natural disaster ever. Brazil’s flash floods and mudslides in recent weeks have claimed over 800 lives and are considered the deadliest natural disaster in the country’s history. Torrential rain since December has triggered major flooding in the Philippines, leaving over 70 people dead, 453,000 displaced, and 1.2 million people affected. The rain in Sri Lanka in recent weeks has been the heaviest in nearly 100 years of record keeping, and the resulting flooding has left over 50 dead, over 3 million affected, and thousands in refugee camps. And the list goes on, as does the flooding.

...A 4% increase in atmospheric moisture may not sound like much, but it turns out that precipitation will increase by about 8% with that 4% moisture increase. Critically, it is the extreme rainfall events that tend to supply the increased rainfall. For example, (Groisman et al., 2004) found a 20% increase in very heavy (top 1%) precipitation events over the U.S. in the past century, and a 36% rise in cold season (October - April) "extreme" precipitation events (those in the 99.9% percentile--1 in 1000 events. These extreme rainfall events are the ones most likely to cause floods” (source).



State of the Climate - Tornadoes
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - National Climatic Data Center

April 2011
(excerpt)
April 2011 was one of the most active, destructive, and deadly tornado months on record for the United States, and could become the benchmark that future months will be compared to. According to data from the Storm Prediction Center (SPC), there were 875 preliminary tornado reports during the month, and the final tornado count will approach the all-time monthly record of 542 tornadoes after all storm surveys are completed. The previous April record was 267 tornadoes, which occurred in April 1974, and the record for any month was May 2003, when there were 542 confirmed tornadoes. The 30-year average for number of April tornadoes is 135.


Pre-Summer roast: Record high temperatures sizzle cities across the globe
June 4, 2011
(excerpt)
HOUSTON, Tx - Can you have a summer heat wave before summer even starts? Apparently so. It looks like Thursday’s record-breaking 100-degree heat was no anomaly (though Houston got a slight “cool down” with a high of 96 Friday). Temperatures are forecast to hit a sweltering 99 degrees today and Sunday, more than two weeks before summer officially kicks off. In fact, we may be in for the hottest June on record. Accuweather meteorologist Dan Kottlowski projects the Houston area will average around 3 degrees above normal for the summer. In Jackson, Mississippi, the temperature reached 101 degrees Thursday afternoon, breaking the previous record of 99 degrees set back on June 2, 1911. Record highs were also reported in Tennessee, Alabama, Louisiana, Missouri, Texas, Virginia and Georgia. Kuwait hit a record high of 51 C. Liverpool England also saw temperatures soar. Carlow, Ireland recorded the highest temperatures so far this year when the mercury hit 25.4C.
 

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And the fear mongering goes unabated.

It was warm today, SEE global WARMIN!!!

It was cold today!!! GLOBAL WARMING!!!

It RAINED LAST THURSDAY!!! GLOBAL WARRRRRRMING!!

There were some tornadoes!! GLOBAL WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRMMMMING!!!


How about the shear dearth of hurricanes last few years...

GLOBAL WARMING!!!!!

But if a Cat IV hit the US Coastline, it's GGGGGGGGGLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLOOOOOOOOOOOBBBBBBBBBBBBBAAAAAAAAAAAAAAALLLLLLLLLLLL WWWWWWWWWWWWAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRMMMMMMMMIIIIIIIIIIINNNNNNNNNNNNNNNGGGGGGGGGGG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

livefree

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And the fear mongering goes unabated.

It was warm today, SEE global WARMIN!!!

It was cold today!!! GLOBAL WARMING!!!

It RAINED LAST THURSDAY!!! GLOBAL WARRRRRRMING!!

There were some tornadoes!! GLOBAL WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRMMMMING!!!


How about the shear dearth of hurricanes last few years...

GLOBAL WARMING!!!!!

But if a Cat IV hit the US Coastline, it's GGGGGGGGGLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLOOOOOOOOOOOBBBBBBBBBBBBBAAAAAAAAAAAAAAALLLLLLLLLLLL WWWWWWWWWWWWAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRMMMMMMMMIIIIIIIIIIINNNNNNNNNNNNNNNGGGGGGGGGGG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

You would make more sense if you just flipped your lips with your finger while making a fart noise.

Climate scientists predictions are accurate = mental breakdown for clueless denier cultists like you.
 

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Hey livefree, I guess I missed your post where you cited the following headines:
- The article where islands and coastlines all over the world are now underwater... as predicted by the IPCC 20 yrs ago.
- The article where the average world temperature has risen several degrees... as predicted by the IPCC 20 yrs ago.
- That other article where so-called climate scientists said "See it's just as hot and dry as it was... in the 1930s!"
 

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Whether or not it's global warming, it is F**king Hot today! 102 in Minneapolis is far too hot.
 

livefree

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Hey livefree, I guess I missed your post where you cited the following headines:
- The article where islands and coastlines all over the world are now underwater... as predicted by the IPCC 20 yrs ago.
- The article where the average world temperature has risen several degrees... as predicted by the IPCC 20 yrs ago.
- That other article where so-called climate scientists said "See it's just as hot and dry as it was... in the 1930s!"
I guess you missed those because they don't exist anywhere but in the idiotic myths and propagandized misinformation cherished by your little cult of AGW denial.
 

Deuce

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Hey livefree, I guess I missed your post where you cited the following headines:
- The article where islands and coastlines all over the world are now underwater... as predicted by the IPCC 20 yrs ago.
- The article where the average world temperature has risen several degrees... as predicted by the IPCC 20 yrs ago.
- That other article where so-called climate scientists said "See it's just as hot and dry as it was... in the 1930s!"
Why don't you show us where these predictions were made?
 

Kernel Sanders

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Individual weather events cannot be linked to climate change. The predicted trends are long term predictions and individual storms a couple of years later are not evidence of their validity.

These threads are as ridiculous as the "it's cold somewhere, therefore global warming is a scam" threads.
 

livefree

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Individual weather events cannot be linked to climate change.
That's true in a way but deceptive because we're not talking so much about individual events as patterns of extreme weather events happening in greater numbers and intensity over years and these patterns are called trends. Trends can be linked to climate change and the reality is that AGW has loaded the dice in favor of more extreme weather events, increased rain and snowfall and flooding. Climate scientist predicted these trends and we are seeing the beginnings of what they predicted coming true. As Dr. Kevin Trenberth said recently:
Because one of the opening statements, which I’m sure you’ve probably heard is “Well you can’t attribute a single event to climate change.” But there is a systematic influence on all of these weather events now-a-days because of the fact that there is this extra water vapor lurking around in the atmosphere than there used to be say 30 years ago. It’s about a 4% extra amount, it invigorates the storms, it provides plenty of moisture for these storms and it’s unfortunate that the public is not associating these with the fact that this is one manifestation of climate change. And the prospects are that these kinds of things will only get bigger and worse in the future.
 

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Hey livefree, I guess I missed your post where you cited the following headines:
- The article where islands and coastlines all over the world are now underwater... as predicted by the IPCC 20 yrs ago.
Perhaps not as dramatic as the IPCC predicted, but I suggest you look up Tuvalu.
 

livefree

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Here's some more of the climate scientists predictions from a bit earlier, in 2003, that also accurately predicted some of the climate changes of recent years. As the scientists predicted, water vapor levels in the atmosphere have gone up by about 4%, intensifying both rainfall and snowfall and causing increased flooding.

Early Warning Signs of Global Warming: Downpours, Heavy Snowfalls, and Flooding
Union of Concerned Scientists
Last Revised: 11/10/03
(excerpts)

An increase in global temperatures will lead to an intensification of the hydrological cycle. This is because an increase in surface air temperature causes an increase in evaporation and generally higher levels of water vapor in the atmosphere. In addition, a warmer atmosphere is capable of holding more water vapor. The excess water vapor will in turn lead to more frequent heavy precipitation when atmospheric instability is sufficient to trigger precipitation events. Intense precipitation can result in flooding, soil erosion, landslides, and damage to structures and crops.

Parallel to the likely increase in heavy precipitation events in winter, increased temperatures will also amplify the drying out of soils and vegetation due to increased evaporation in the summer. This is likely to result in more severe and widespread droughts where and when atmospheric conditions do not favor precipitation (see Droughts and Wildfires).

The largest changes in precipitation are expected at mid- to- high latitudes (Kattenberg et al., 1996). Climate models predict an increase in average precipitation in winter at high latitudes due to poleward transport of evaporated moisture from lower latitudes. There is also an increase in the expected frequency and areal extent of intense precipitation over the continents. Predictions for soil moisture changes are less certain; however, models show an increase in soil moisture in high northern latitudes in winter.


So there's the predictions and here's what has been happening.

2010 Terrible Weather: Quakes, Floods, Blizzards
Earthquakes, Heat Waves, Floods, Volcanoes, Super Typhoons, Blizzards and Droughts Make 2010 a Deadly Year

CBS News
Dec. 20, 2010
(excerpts)
(AP) This was the year the Earth struck back. Earthquakes, heat waves, floods, volcanoes, super typhoons, blizzards, landslides and droughts killed at least a quarter million people in 2010 - the deadliest year in more than a generation. More people were killed worldwide by natural disasters this year than have been killed in terrorism attacks in the past 40 years combined.

"It just seemed like it was back-to-back and it came in waves," said Craig Fugate, who heads the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency. It handled a record number of disasters in 2010.

"The term '100-year event' really lost its meaning this year."



2011: Year of the flood
January 21, 2011
(excerpts)
The year 2010 was one the worst years in world history for high-impact floods. But just three weeks into the new year, 2011 has already had an entire year’s worth of mega-floods. I’ll recap here six remarkable floods that have already occurred this year.

Brazil suffered its deadliest natural disaster in history last week, when torrential rains inundated a heavily populated, steep-sloped area about 40 miles north of Rio de Janeiro. Flash floods and mudslides from the heavy rains have claimed at least 772 lives, including 357 in Nova Friburgo and 323 in Teresópolis. The storm left 126 people missing, the Brazilian Health and Civil Defense Ministry said Thursday. Rainfall amounts of approximately 300 mm (12 inches) fell in just a few hours in the hardest-hit regions. Damage estimates are currently $1.2 billion, and 13,000 are homeless.

Australia’s most expensive natural disaster in history is now the Queensland flood of 2010 – 2011, with a price tag now as high as $30 billion. At least 31 have been killed since December in the floods, and another 40 are missing. According to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, in 2010 Australia had its wettest spring (September – November) since records began 111 years ago, with some sections of coastal Queensland receiving over 4 feet (1200 mm) of rain. Rainfall in Queensland and all of eastern Australia in December was the greatest on record, and the year 2010 was the rainiest year on record for Queensland.

Australia Victoria - From January 12 – 14, extremely heavy rains over the southern Australian state of Victoria caused major flooding that killed one person and caused hundreds of millions in damage. Kevin Parkyn, a senior forecaster with the Bureau of Meteorology said “Victoria is experiencing one of its worst flood events in its history” after “a week in which rainfall totals have been smashed in parts of Victoria”. Bureau of Meteorology senior forecaster Terry Ryan said “It’s the worst flood in western Victoria in their history as far as our records go in terms of the depth of water and the number of places affected.”

100-year flood in Sri Lanka - As I reported in my previous post, at least 43 are dead and damage estimates are at $500 million in Sri Lanka, which suffered a 1-in-100 year flood this month.

South Africa - Heavy rains of up 345 mm (13.6″) have fallen in South Africa so far this month, resulting in deadly floods that have killed 40 people. Seven of the country’s nine provinces have been declared disaster zones. Agricultural damage alone from the floods is estimated at $145 million. Heavy rains and severe flooding have also affected neighboring Mozambique, where 13 people are dead and 13,000 homeless or suffering damaged homes. Neighboring Zimbabwe has seen its heaviest rains in 30 years in recent weeks...

Philippines - Very heavy rains since late December have triggered a major flooding disaster in the Philippines, where 40 are dead, 453,000 people displaced, and 1.2 million people affected.



Massive flooding extends across American South, Midwest
CNN
May 04, 2011
 

Kernel Sanders

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That's true in a way but deceptive because we're not talking so much about individual events as patterns of extreme weather events happening in greater numbers and intensity over years and these patterns are called trends. Trends can be linked to climate change and the reality is that AGW has loaded the dice in favor of more extreme weather events, increased rain and snowfall and flooding. Climate scientist predicted these trends and we are seeing the beginnings of what they predicted coming true. As Dr. Kevin Trenberth said recently:
Because one of the opening statements, which I’m sure you’ve probably heard is “Well you can’t attribute a single event to climate change.” But there is a systematic influence on all of these weather events now-a-days because of the fact that there is this extra water vapor lurking around in the atmosphere than there used to be say 30 years ago. It’s about a 4% extra amount, it invigorates the storms, it provides plenty of moisture for these storms and it’s unfortunate that the public is not associating these with the fact that this is one manifestation of climate change. And the prospects are that these kinds of things will only get bigger and worse in the future.
There is no such trend. Below is a graph of strong tonados per year from the NOAA



You are seizing on an individual weather event and attempting to draw a trend from it
 

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There is no such trend. Below is a graph of strong tonados per year from the NOAA



You are seizing on an individual weather event and attempting to draw a trend from it
You don't understand, they predict they'll get WORSE (the tornadoes) this year validates that...
It helps them believe in the cause to rationalize like this.
 

livefree

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There is no such trend. Below is a graph of strong tonados per year from the NOAA



You are seizing on an individual weather event and attempting to draw a trend from it
Who said we were just talking about tornadoes? Trenbreth was saying that the extra 4% more water vapor in the atmosphere than there used to be 30 years ago is invigorating the rain and snow storms. I'm posting articles like this one talking about... Early Warning Signs of Global Warming: Downpours, Heavy Snowfalls, and Flooding and backing it up with articles about all of the "Heat Waves, Floods, Super Typhoons, Blizzards and Droughts" in 2010 - 2011: Year of the flood & Massive flooding extends across American South, Midwest. I don't see anyone there claiming an increasing trend in tornado numbers (because there currently isn't one). There is a strong possibility that this year's tornado hyper-activity may be linked to conditions created by global warming but it is not yet a trend.

There are lots of verifiable trends linked to anthropogenic global warming/climate changes. Higher temperatures, more precipitation in many areas, more drought in other areas, melting glaciers and icecaps, rising sea levels, changing seasonal timing, animal and plant migration due to changing temperatures, etc., etc..
 

Kernel Sanders

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Who said we were just talking about tornadoes? Trenbreth was saying that the extra 4% more water vapor in the atmosphere than there used to be 30 years ago is invigorating the rain and snow storms. I'm posting articles like this one talking about... Early Warning Signs of Global Warming: Downpours, Heavy Snowfalls, and Flooding and backing it up with articles about all of the "Heat Waves, Floods, Super Typhoons, Blizzards and Droughts" in 2010 - 2011: Year of the flood & Massive flooding extends across American South, Midwest. I don't see anyone there claiming an increasing trend in tornado numbers (because there currently isn't one). There is a strong possibility that this year's tornado hyper-activity may be linked to conditions created by global warming but it is not yet a trend.

There are lots of verifiable trends linked to anthropogenic global warming/climate changes. Higher temperatures, more precipitation in many areas, more drought in other areas, melting glaciers and icecaps, rising sea levels, changing seasonal timing, animal and plant migration due to changing temperatures, etc., etc..
EPA reports that there is no global trend in total precipitation

Globally there has been no statistically significant overall trend in precipitation over the past century, although trends have varied widely by region and over time.
[Source]

You also appear not to have read your own sources, as they do not support your assertion.

The year 2011 has begun with a remarkable number of high-impact floods world-wide, and much of the blame for this can be placed on the current La Niña event occurring in the Eastern Pacific.
 

livefree

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EPA reports that there is no global trend in total precipitation

[Source]
LOLOLOL. Nice cherry-picking, dude.

The whole EPA quote is a bit more interesting.

Precipitation Changes

Increasing temperatures tend to increase evaporation which leads to more precipitation (IPCC, 2007). As average global temperatures have risen, average global precipitation has also increased. According to the IPCC, the following precipitation trends have been observed:

United States Precipitation Changes

Observations compiled by NOAA's National Climatic Data Center show that over the contiguous U.S., total annual precipitation increased at an average rate of 6.1 percent per century since 1900, although there was considerable regional variability. The greatest increases in precipitation were in the East North Central climate region (11.6 percent per century) and the South (11.1 percent). Hawaii was the only region to show a decrease (-9.25 percent). Precipitation in the Northeast increased by 7.31 percent, in the Southeast by 2.96 percent, the Central United States by 7.91 percent, the West North Central by 2.96 percent, the Southwest by 1.47 percent, the West by 8.96 percent, the Northwest by 5.45 percent, and Alaska by 6.08 percent.

* Precipitation has generally increased over land north of 30°N from 1900-2005, but has mostly declined over the tropics since the 1970s. Globally there has been no statistically significant overall trend in precipitation over the past century, although trends have varied widely by region and over time.
* It has become significantly wetter in eastern parts of North and South America, northern Europe, and northern and central Asia, but drier in the Sahel, the Mediterranean, southern Africa and parts of southern Asia.
* Changes in precipitation and evaporation over the oceans are suggested by freshening of mid- and high-latitude waters (implying more precipitation), along with increased salinity in low-latitude waters (implying less precipitation and/or more evaporation).
* There has been an increase in the number of heavy precipitation events over many areas during the past century, as well as an increase since the 1970s in the prevalence of droughts—especially in the tropics and subtropics.

In the Northern Hemisphere's mid- and high latitudes, the precipitation trends are consistent with climate model simulations that predict an increase in precipitation due to human-induced warming.
By contrast, the degree to which human influences have been responsible for any variations in tropical precipitation patterns is not well understood or agreed upon, as climate models often differ in their regional projections (IPCC, 2007).


So.....as I just said in the previous post that you quoted: "There are lots of verifiable trends linked to anthropogenic global warming/climate changes....more precipitation in many areas, more drought in other areas...". So far, the increased drought in some areas is offsetting the increased precipitation in other areas, so the EPA study says that: "Precipitation has generally increased over land north of 30°N from 1900-2005, but has mostly declined over the tropics since the 1970s. Globally there has been no statistically significant overall trend in precipitation over the past century, although trends have varied widely by region and over time."
 
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Kernel Sanders

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LOLOLOL. Nice cherry-picking, dude.

The whole EPA quote is a bit more interesting.

Precipitation Changes

Increasing temperatures tend to increase evaporation which leads to more precipitation (IPCC, 2007). As average global temperatures have risen, average global precipitation has also increased. According to the IPCC, the following precipitation trends have been observed:

United States Precipitation Changes

Observations compiled by NOAA's National Climatic Data Center show that over the contiguous U.S., total annual precipitation increased at an average rate of 6.1 percent per century since 1900, although there was considerable regional variability. The greatest increases in precipitation were in the East North Central climate region (11.6 percent per century) and the South (11.1 percent). Hawaii was the only region to show a decrease (-9.25 percent). Precipitation in the Northeast increased by 7.31 percent, in the Southeast by 2.96 percent, the Central United States by 7.91 percent, the West North Central by 2.96 percent, the Southwest by 1.47 percent, the West by 8.96 percent, the Northwest by 5.45 percent, and Alaska by 6.08 percent.

* Precipitation has generally increased over land north of 30°N from 1900-2005, but has mostly declined over the tropics since the 1970s. Globally there has been no statistically significant overall trend in precipitation over the past century, although trends have varied widely by region and over time.
* It has become significantly wetter in eastern parts of North and South America, northern Europe, and northern and central Asia, but drier in the Sahel, the Mediterranean, southern Africa and parts of southern Asia.
* Changes in precipitation and evaporation over the oceans are suggested by freshening of mid- and high-latitude waters (implying more precipitation), along with increased salinity in low-latitude waters (implying less precipitation and/or more evaporation).
* There has been an increase in the number of heavy precipitation events over many areas during the past century, as well as an increase since the 1970s in the prevalence of droughts—especially in the tropics and subtropics.

In the Northern Hemisphere's mid- and high latitudes, the precipitation trends are consistent with climate model simulations that predict an increase in precipitation due to human-induced warming.
By contrast, the degree to which human influences have been responsible for any variations in tropical precipitation patterns is not well understood or agreed upon, as climate models often differ in their regional projections (IPCC, 2007).


So.....as I just said in the previous post that you quoted: "There are lots of verifiable trends linked to anthropogenic global warming/climate changes....more precipitation in many areas, more drought in other areas...". So far, the increased drought in some areas is offsetting the increased precipitation in other areas, so the EPA study says that: "Precipitation has generally increased over land north of 30°N from 1900-2005, but has mostly declined over the tropics since the 1970s. Globally there has been no statistically significant overall trend in precipitation over the past century, although trends have varied widely by region and over time."
As the site states, regional variations balance each other out, and there is no global trend. I fail to see how this supports your assertion of an increasing global trend.
 

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As the site states, regional variations balance each other out, and there is no global trend. I fail to see how this supports your assertion of an increasing global trend.
It's probably wherever he found these links all compiled told them what they say, and that he must not listen to "deniers".
 

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Please stop with the personal attacks.
What "personal attacks"? I haven't seen any so please point them out.
 

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As the site states, regional variations balance each other out, and there is no global trend. I fail to see how this supports your assertion of an increasing global trend.
LOLOLOLOL. So, if there's a major drought in one area and massive rainfall and flooding in another area, you just say they "balance each other out" so nothing is really happening??? LOLOLOLOL.

There are trends towards increased precipitation and flooding in many areas and there are trends towards increased droughts in other areas. The tropics are experiencing less rainfall and the higher latitudes are getting more rain and snow which is resulting in more flooding. That's the global trend.
 

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What "personal attacks"? I haven't seen any so please point them out.
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You may NOT comment on moderation, publicly. If you have an issue with moderation, you may only comment via PM. Please do not do this again.
 

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You don't understand, they predict they'll get WORSE (the tornadoes) this year validates that...
It helps them believe in the cause to rationalize like this.
People who do this are just as wrong as the people who point at the number of record cold temperatures this year as evidence that the world is not getting warmer.

If it's not a multi-decade trend of all the data (not individual locations) then it's basically an anecdote. And also:
The plural of anecdote is not data.
 

Renae

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People who do this are just as wrong as the people who point at the number of record cold temperatures this year as evidence that the world is not getting warmer.

If it's not a multi-decade trend of all the data (not individual locations) then it's basically an anecdote. And also:
The plural of anecdote is not data.
The multi year trend is not showing an increase, thus anyone that's wants scientific proof should be questioning the claims that the Earth is getting warmer and bad things will happen.
 

Deuce

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The multi year trend is not showing an increase, thus anyone that's wants scientific proof should be questioning the claims that the Earth is getting warmer and bad things will happen.
Well, the Earth is getting warmer. Tornadoes don't appear to have any trend at all. Other things do have trends.
 
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