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Brexit & U.S. Independence Movements

Geoist

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Politico just posted an article listing off a few independence movements in the U.S. These groups have long been considered on the fringes of politics. I see them as a natural reaction to the continuous centralization of governmental powers. True democracy requires decentralization. Why is decentralization good for democracy? Because the People can have a louder voice in the process. Because the People are more likely to recognize the legitimacy of locally elected officials over D.C. bureaucrats. And because a more local government can better respond to the needs of the People.

I do not deny centralization having its 'advantages,' but at this point it seems it is more to the advantage of the elite rather than the common man.
 

Abbazorkzog

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Politico just posted an article listing off a few independence movements in the U.S. These groups have long been considered on the fringes of politics. I see them as a natural reaction to the continuous centralization of governmental powers. True democracy requires decentralization. Why is decentralization good for democracy? Because the People can have a louder voice in the process. Because the People are more likely to recognize the legitimacy of locally elected officials over D.C. bureaucrats. And because a more local government can better respond to the needs of the People.

I do not deny centralization having its 'advantages,' but at this point it seems it is more to the advantage of the elite rather than the common man.

We need an Independence Front.
 

joG

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Politico just posted an article listing off a few independence movements in the U.S. These groups have long been considered on the fringes of politics. I see them as a natural reaction to the continuous centralization of governmental powers. True democracy requires decentralization. Why is decentralization good for democracy? Because the People can have a louder voice in the process. Because the People are more likely to recognize the legitimacy of locally elected officials over D.C. bureaucrats. And because a more local government can better respond to the needs of the People.

I do not deny centralization having its 'advantages,' but at this point it seems it is more to the advantage of the elite rather than the common man.

In theory the question is simple. Society requires a level of decision making appropriate to the reach of the public good the commons want to organise. If the public good requires a wide reach, individual communities cannot produce the public good efficiently.

The details are more difficult.
 

Geoist

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In theory the question is simple. Society requires a level of decision making appropriate to the reach of the public good the commons want to organise. If the public good requires a wide reach, individual communities cannot produce the public good efficiently.

The details are more difficult.

What would you consider to be a public good that requires a wide reach? I can understand the argument in cases like environmental issues (e.g. air pollution, which knows no political boundaries). Alliances could still be made between city-states (or whatever we call them) to get these things done. Would it really be so inefficient compared to the divisive partisan environment of centralized government we have to work with today? :shrug:
 

joG

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What would you consider to be a public good that requires a wide reach? I can understand the argument in cases like environmental issues (e.g. air pollution, which knows no political boundaries). Alliances could still be made between city-states (or whatever we call them) to get these things done. Would it really be so inefficient compared to the divisive partisan environment of centralized government we have to work with today? :shrug:

That is a good point. It is true that environmental treaties can work, though, the motivation to free ride can be rather large. The military is similar. By raising the level of internalization of security the necessity for everyone to have a military to defend oneself becomes less urgent.

As you point out, organization and negotiations are not easy, just because they are lifted to a higher hierarchal level. It is a long learning process and different societies find different solutions to the problem. Europe is demonstrating that is is not easy.
 
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