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Bigger concern, white non-hispanic or minority abuses to U.S. political system & national debt level? (1 Viewer)

Who should voters be most concerned are taking more than contributing, non-hispanic whites or others

  • non-hispanic whites are a greater problem to U.S. society than everyone else

    Votes: 2 100.0%
  • California more successful than most other states because cooperative non-hispanic white minority

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • California not more successful than most other states & its success level not result of racial %

    Votes: 1 50.0%
  • non-hispanic whites contribute more to U.S. society success than everyone else

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    2

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Lady of the house wonderin' where it's gonna stop
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In the 2020 presidential election,
41% white vote, which was 67% of total vote, went to Biden, 58% to Trump, we soon learned the white reaction to the outcome
Race/ethnicity
White415867

Abuses include systemically eroding rule of law via power of elected office, nominating judges, appointing attorney general, DOJ positions in
civil lawsuits and prosecutions, civil rights enforcement, restraint exhibited and practiced by executive branch in reaction to prosecutions and judicial rulings, co-operation and support for inspectors general and with congressional oversight, journalistic and members of public FOIA requests, treatment of peaceful protests.

Personal integrity of elected, especially refraining from making false statements and using race and other wedge issues to attract votes and divert attention from actual political policies and the success of those policies, success translating as overall wellbeing of society, deferring to scientific method and experts employing those methods in making political policy, judicial, and medical ethics and public health policies,
level of household income, incarceration rate, level of violent crime, educational level, intensity of racial tension, participation of women and minorities in all public and private levels and sectors.

Is commitment by politicians to universal access to healthcare a policy contributing to society or the opposite?

Abuses by residents include false financial disclosure to obtain loans or government assistance, seeking taking unearned compensation from employers, clients, customers, using the courts by taking advantage of personal or business wealth to threaten or maneuver those without the means to endure expensive litigation despite having committed no tort or crime justifying legal action taken against them....

Just some examples.... who are the abusers we should be most concerned about and is concern predictably focused on who and where it should be.

Are prosecutors, LEO, and jailers more of an asset to society or a liability, are elected officials of either or of both parties more of an asset to society or a liability compared to the crime and the political problems they are paid to find solutions for, to reduce, or at least to hold in check.

I ask because the largest U.S. state, California, is 38% white non-hispanic, down from 90% in 1940, and seems a model state compared to most others. What are they doing, right?


34. Florida
> Median household income:
$59,227
> Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree: 30.7% (23rd lowest)
> Poverty rate: 12.7% (19th highest)
> Median home value: $245,100 (22nd highest)
> Population: 21,477,737

22. Texas
> Median household income:
$64,034
> Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree: 30.8% (24th lowest)
> Poverty rate: 13.6% (11th highest — tied)
> Median home value: $200,400 (22nd lowest)
> Population: 28,995,881

14. New York
> Median household income:
$72,108
> Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree: 37.8% (8th highest)
> Poverty rate: 13.0% (16th highest — tied)
> Median home value: $338,700 (8th highest)
> Population: 19,453,561

5. California
> Median household income:
$80,440
> Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree: 35.0% (13th highest)
> Poverty rate: 11.8% (25th highest)
> Median home value: $568,500 (2nd highest)
> Population: 39,512,223
 
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Your great-grandchildren will learn which of the 4 choices was correct.

Personally, I have no doubt as to what the correct choice will be.

But I could be mistaken.
 

Donald Trump's 2012 Election Tweetstorm Resurfaces as Popular and Electoral Vote Appear Divided

November 9, 2016,
"In additional tweets since deleted, Trump asks why Romney should lose if he received a greater number of votes...

“He lost the popular vote by a lot and won the election. We should have a revolution in this country!” said Trump in one deleted tweet, and “More votes equals a loss … revolution!” in another.

The complaints from 2012 resurfaced earlier in the campaign cycle as Trump began to allege that the election would be rigged. In an interview
..
“I think the system is rigged,” said Trump. “I think it was -- horrible the way [the prior Republican ticket was] treated in the media. The only thing worse is the way I'm being treated. ”.."

We live in a country in which the voting majority in a disturbingly high number of states consistently votes exclusively for candidates who only represent their own best interests and the best interests of their wealthiest donors. Ironically, the voting majorities in those states tend to be less educated, poorer, whiter, and more racist than in states in which the voting majorities vote for candidates who represent the voters' interests at least some of the time.

Example, of the remaining states not yet expanding medicaid under ACA, only one is in the top 20 economically, the one with
the smallest population in the continental U.S.

50. Mississippi
> Median household income:
$45,792
> Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree: 22.3% (2nd lowest)
> Poverty (the highest)
> Median home value: $128,200 (2nd lowest)
> Population: 2,976,149

43. Oklahoma
> Median household income:
$54,449
> at least a bachelor’s degree: 26.2% (7th lowest)
> Poverty (8th highest)
> home value: $147,000 (4th lowest)
> Population: 3,956,971

46. Alabama
> income:
$51,734
> at least a bachelor’s degree: 26.3% (8th lowest)
> Poverty (7th highest)
> home value: $154,000 (6th lowest)
> Population: 4,903,185

42. Tennessee
> income:
$56,071
> at least a bachelor’s degree: 28.7% (11th lowest — tied)
> Poverty (9th highest)
> home value: $191,900 (18th lowest)
> Population: 6,829,174

19. Wyoming
> income:
$65,003
> at least a bachelor’s degree: 29.1% (13th lowest)
> Poverty (13th lowest — tied)
> home value: $235,200 (23rd highest)
> Population: 578,759

41. South Carolina
> income:
$56,227
> at least a bachelor’s degree: 29.6% (16th lowest)
> Poverty (10th highest)
> home value: $179,800 (15th lowest)
> Population: 5,148,714

33. South Dakota
> income:
$59,533
> at least a bachelor’s degree: 29.7% (17th lowest)
> Poverty (23rd highest — tied)
> home value: $185,000 (17th lowest)
> Population: 884,659

34. Florida
> income:
$59,227
> at least a bachelor’s degree: 30.7% (23rd lowest)
> Poverty (19th highest)
> home value: $245,100 (22nd highest)

22. Texas
> income:
$64,034
> at least a bachelor’s degree: 30.8% (24th lowest)
> Poverty (11th highest — tied)
> home value: $200,400 (22nd lowest)
> Population: 28,995,881

21. Wisconsin
> income:
$64,168
> at least a bachelor’s degree: 31.3% (25th lowest)
> Poverty (16th lowest)
> home value: $197,200 (21st lowest)
> Population: 5,822,434



39. North Carolina
> income:
$57,341
> at least a bachelor’s degree: 32.3% (24th highest — tied)
> Poverty (11th highest — tied)
> home value: $193,200 (20th lowest)
> Population: 10,488,084

29. Georgia
> income:
$61,980
> at least a bachelor’s degree: 32.5% (23rd highest)
> Poverty (14th highest)
> home value: $202,500 (24th lowest)
> Population: 10,617,423

27. Kansas
> Median household income:
$62,087
> Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree: 34.0% (17th highest)
> Poverty (23rd lowest — tied)
> home value: $163,200 (10th lowest)
> Population: 2,913,314
 
Having lived in California...it does a few things right, and it's far from the worst place in the country to live (if you can afford it). But a model state? California is not particularly well-governed. Its reputation for pointless bureaucracy and bloated government is well-deserved.
 
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I don't think median income or home values are very good metrics for evaluating the success of a state.

In California, there have been deliberate, decades-long efforts to block construction of new homes. The NIMBY lobbyists are a real problem for California...probably the single biggest economic problem the state faces.

As a result, California has a high median income. But not because the state has solved poverty...far from it. It just has policies that encourage poor people to leave and go somewhere else.
 
Not sure what the racial composition of the states has to do with anything. There are mostly-white states that do quite well (e.g. New Hampshire) and mostly-white states that are basket cases (e.g. Kansas). Similarly there are diverse states that do quite well (e.g. Hawaii) and diverse states that are basket cases (e.g. Illinois).
 
Not sure what the racial composition of the states has to do with anything. There are mostly-white states that do quite well (e.g. New Hampshire) and mostly-white states that are basket cases (e.g. Kansas). Similarly there are diverse states that do quite well (e.g. Hawaii) and diverse states that are basket cases (e.g. Illinois).
I can only compare states to each other. Are governments of Florida, Texas, and Georgia performing better than those in California, New York,
and Illinois?

The first three, for example, intentionally block huge numbers from access to affordable healthcare with no economic
justification for doing that, in 2021-22, it is actually costing each of the states more to block access to millions, in the aggregate.

January 9, 2022
Politifact

Fact-check: Did Texas turn down $100 billion when Republicans rejected Medicaid expansion?​

Austin American-Statesman
...Texas lags behind the rest of the nation when it comes to health care coverage. According to 2019 Census Bureau health insurance coverage data released in 2020, nearly 1 in 5 Texans, or 18.4%, are uninsured....
...The statement is accurate but needs additional context. We rate it Mostly True."


34. Florida
> income:
$59,227
> at least a bachelor’s degree: 30.7% (23rd lowest)
> Poverty (19th highest)
> home value: $245,100 (22nd highest)

29. Georgia
> income:
$61,980
> at least a bachelor’s degree: 32.5% (23rd highest)
> Poverty (14th highest)
> home value: $202,500 (24th lowest)
> Population: 10,617,423

22. Texas
> income:
$64,034
> at least a bachelor’s degree: 30.8% (24th lowest)
> Poverty (11th highest — tied)
> home value: $200,400 (22nd lowest)
> Population: 28,995,881

17. Illinois
> Median household income:
$69,187
> Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree: 35.8% (12th highest)
> Poverty rate: 11.5% (25th lowest)
> Median home value: $209,100 (25th highest)
> Population: 12,671,821

14. New York
> Median household income:
$72,108
> Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree: 37.8% (8th highest)
> Poverty rate: 13.0% (16th highest — tied)
> Median home value: $338,700 (8th highest)
> Population: 19,453,561

5. California
> Median household income:
$80,440
> Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree: 35.0% (13th highest)
> Poverty rate: 11.8% (25th highest)
> Median home value: $568,500 (2nd highest)
> Population: 39,512,223
 
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I can only compare states to each other. Are governments of Florida, Texas, and Georgia performing better than those in California, New York,
and Illinois?
As a group, I would say the first three perform better than the last three. But TX is one of the best-performing states, and IL is one of the worst. I don't get the impression it has anything to do with their racial composition.

The first three, for example, intentionally block huge numbers from access to affordable healthcare with no economic
justification for doing that, in 2021-22, it is actually costing each of the states more to block access to millions, in the aggregate.
I agree, but they just have different problems. Texas blocks poor people from affordable health care; California blocks poor people from affordable housing. Ideally, states should do neither.
 

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