• This is a political forum that is non-biased/non-partisan and treats every person's position on topics equally. This debate forum is not aligned to any political party. In today's politics, many ideas are split between and even within all the political parties. Often we find ourselves agreeing on one platform but some topics break our mold. We are here to discuss them in a civil political debate. If this is your first visit to our political forums, be sure to check out the RULES. Registering for debate politics is necessary before posting. Register today to participate - it's free!

Belarus Factory Workers Hold Mass Walkouts to Back Opposition

Rogue Valley

Exordium and Terminus
Supporting Member
DP Veteran
Joined
Apr 18, 2013
Messages
66,815
Reaction score
51,001
Location
Barsoom
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
Belarus Factory Workers Hold Mass Walkouts to Back Opposition

It’s not yet clear how the country will emerge from this crisis, but it’s safe to say things won’t go back to the way they were.

000_1wi2sh.jpg

"We're not sheep, we're not a herd, we're not little people! We are MTZ workers, we are not 20 people, we are 16,000!"

8/15/20
Crowds of workers walked off the job on Friday at several factories in Belarus's capital Minsk in support of the opposition calling for leader Alexander Lukashenko to step down. Hundreds of workers marched from the Minsk Automobile Plant (MAZ) and the Minsk Tractor Works (MTZ) after the opposition called for strikes against Lukashenko's disputed claim to have won re-election on Sunday. Opposition candidate Svetlana Tikhanovskaya has claimed victory in the polls after raising up a nationwide protest movement. She left for Lithuania after allies said she came under official pressure. The walkouts were highly unusual in a country where Lukashenko has retained a Soviet-style command economy and the tractor factory is seen as a national symbol. The Belarusian Prime Minister Roman Golovchenko, appointed in June, came to visit the tractor plant but the striking workers left before he arrived. On Friday afternoon they marched out of the factory into the city center, shouting "Long live Belarus" and "Leave!" directed at Lukashenko. One of the strikers, a middle-aged man with a tattoo on his arm denoting support for the opposition, said that he wanted "to bring back Tikhanovskaya, she is our president, we voted for her."

Lukashenko earlier Friday dismissed the walkouts at the tractor and auto plants, saying that "20 people decided to express their opinion, ditched work and went off." He also warned that foreign competitors would benefit from strikes and suggested that workers were being paid to protest. Belarus is regionally famous as a producer of tractors and they take part in a parade on its national independence day. Workers at a major fertilizer plant, Grodno Azot, also protested in the city of Grodno, local media reported. Belarus last saw such large-scale workers' protests and strikes ahead of the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991. Lukashenko has been in power since 1994.

This is a tectonic political shift in Belarus. If the heavy-industry factory workers strike, it has a domino effect on the national economy.

Related: Belarus Protests Signal the Autumn of Lukashenko’s Regime
 

Ringo Stalin

Banned
DP Veteran
Joined
Dec 18, 2019
Messages
4,292
Reaction score
628
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Communist
Miners in Belarus are on strike and demanding changes. At the moment, they have:
"Reduced 35-hour working week. The vacation of 24 days plus an additional 42 days. The law stipulates the right to early retirement after 20 years of work..."
Note that most of them do not work in dangerous coal mines, but the benefits are the same as if they work next to methane, at a depth of 1.5 km...

They can really invite lots of changes:
"In the early 1990s, miners played a significant role in Yeltsin's rise to power. The miners demanded market-oriented reforms. And in 1998, at some mines, the salary debt reached seven months or more. People demanded payment of salaries,pensions, allowances, and the resignation of the government."

I am always interested in watching these people: Are they get mad from a good life, and are ready to shoot off their legs and balls... Well, or they're just stupid...

P.S. they are no longer on strike. All the mines are in operation.
 
Last edited:

Rogue Valley

Exordium and Terminus
Supporting Member
DP Veteran
Joined
Apr 18, 2013
Messages
66,815
Reaction score
51,001
Location
Barsoom
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
Miners in Belarus are on strike and demanding changes. At the moment, they have:
"Reduced 35-hour working week. The vacation of 24 days plus an additional 42 days. The law stipulates the right to early retirement after 20 years of work..."
Note that most of them do not work in dangerous coal mines, but the benefits are the same as if they work next to methane, at a depth of 1.5 km...

They can really invite lots of changes:
"In the early 1990s, miners played a significant role in Yeltsin's rise to power. The miners demanded market-oriented reforms. And in 1998, at some mines, the salary debt reached seven months or more. People demanded payment of salaries,pensions, allowances, and the resignation of the government."

I am always interested in watching these people: Are they get mad from a good life, and are ready to shoot off their legs and balls... Well, or they're just stupid...

P.S. they are no longer on strike. All the mines are in operation.

No citations. Just ramblings from someone who calls himself Mr. Ringo Stalin.
 
Top Bottom