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Barr Asks Apple to Unlock Pensacola Killer’s Phones, Setting Up Clash

JacksinPA

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Barr Asks Apple to Unlock Pensacola Killer’s Phones, Setting Up Clash - The New York Times [paywall]

The request set up a collision between law enforcement and big technology firms in the latest battle over privacy and security.

WASHINGTON — Attorney General William P. Barr declared on Monday that a deadly shooting last month at a naval air station in Pensacola, Fla., was an act of terrorism, and he asked Apple in an unusually high-profile request to provide access to two phones used by the gunman.

Mr. Barr’s appeal was an escalation of a continuing fight between the Justice Department and Apple pitting personal privacy against public safety.
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This controversy has been going on for a number of years. Apple & other smart phone makers have software that allows them to unlock the cryptographic lock that protects the data in these phones. But allowing the government access to it violates a number of civil liberties rights protections as well as destroying much of the attractiveness of this security feature on their phone products.

The FBI & NSA should have equivalent unlocking software in their bag of tricks. If they don't, they have to develop it.

Supercomputers can generate every possible password for these phones, given enough time. It's equivalent to the classic argument that given enough monkeys at typewriters they will eventually turn out the works of Shakespeare.
 

TheDoctorWasIn

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Barr Asks Apple to Unlock Pensacola Killer’s Phones, Setting Up Clash - The New York Times [paywall]

The request set up a collision between law enforcement and big technology firms in the latest battle over privacy and security.

WASHINGTON — Attorney General William P. Barr declared on Monday that a deadly shooting last month at a naval air station in Pensacola, Fla., was an act of terrorism, and he asked Apple in an unusually high-profile request to provide access to two phones used by the gunman.

Mr. Barr’s appeal was an escalation of a continuing fight between the Justice Department and Apple pitting personal privacy against public safety.
======================================================
This controversy has been going on for a number of years. Apple & other smart phone makers have software that allows them to unlock the cryptographic lock that protects the data in these phones. But allowing the government access to it violates a number of civil liberties rights protections as well as destroying much of the attractiveness of this security feature on their phone products.

The FBI & NSA should have equivalent unlocking software in their bag of tricks. If they don't, they have to develop it.

Supercomputers can generate every possible password for these phones, given enough time. It's equivalent to the classic argument that given enough monkeys at typewriters they will eventually turn out the works of Shakespeare.

Problem is, you can set your iPhone (or Android phone) to wipe the memory if the wrong password is put in a certain number of times.

So you only really get a few chances to guess the code.
 

Chillfolks

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I don't really have an issue with the government using the proper legal channels to get a specific phone unlocked to aid in an investigation, however I would see a major problem of the tech companies gave the encryption key to the government without a court order to snoop as they see fit.
 

JacksinPA

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Problem is, you can set your iPhone (or Android phone) to wipe the memory if the wrong password is put in a certain number of times.

So you only really get a few chances to guess the code.

The FBI & NSA are clever enough to find a workaround for this.
 

tacomancer

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JacksinPA

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TheDoctorWasIn

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Its a high profile case, those methods cold be protected.

This is true - there is a good chance that if the NSA had found a way around it, they wouldn't want it advertised.

Either way, I support Apple refusing to help the FBI without a specific court order.
 

tacomancer

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This is true - there is a good chance that if the NSA had found a way around it, they wouldn't want it advertised.

Either way, I support Apple refusing to help the FBI without a specific court order.

IIRC the last time this came up, Apple told the courts that they would have to modify the OS for it to happen as the possibility of them accessing it was designed out. I wonder if that will still be the claim.
 

KevinKohler

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What did detectives do before criminals were using smart phones?
 

Roadvirus

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Apple is willing to protect terrorists' privacy, but has no problem using Siri to spy on normal people.
 

JacksinPA

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Barr Asks Apple to Unlock Pensacola Killer’s Phones, Setting Up Clash - The New York Times [paywall]

The request set up a collision between law enforcement and big technology firms in the latest battle over privacy and security.

WASHINGTON — Attorney General William P. Barr declared on Monday that a deadly shooting last month at a naval air station in Pensacola, Fla., was an act of terrorism, and he asked Apple in an unusually high-profile request to provide access to two phones used by the gunman.

Mr. Barr’s appeal was an escalation of a continuing fight between the Justice Department and Apple pitting personal privacy against public safety.
======================================================
This controversy has been going on for a number of years. Apple & other smart phone makers have software that allows them to unlock the cryptographic lock that protects the data in these phones. But allowing the government access to it violates a number of civil liberties rights protections as well as destroying much of the attractiveness of this security feature on their phone products.

The FBI & NSA should have equivalent unlocking software in their bag of tricks. If they don't, they have to develop it.

Supercomputers can generate every possible password for these phones, given enough time. It's equivalent to the classic argument that given enough monkeys at typewriters they will eventually turn out the works of Shakespeare.

Like it or not, there is NO right to privacy in the USA constitution. A warrant and court order should force it to be unlocked.
 

Travelsonic

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Apple is willing to protect terrorists' privacy,

:roll:

Got any proof for that assertion besides the inability to hand over non-existent keys to a non-existent backdoor, the presence of which would put the security of anyone using iOS at risk?
 
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