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Backpacking

rivrrat

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Any experienced backpackers here?

I'm a day hiker, and multi-day camper, but I've never combined the two. Generally, I want to camp near my car. It's convenient. LOL

However, since I'd like to trek to at least Camp One of Everest someday, I figure I should do some backpacking to train. ;) Plus, it'll be good exercise. But, I'm honestly not sure where the hell to start. It would be all too easy to buy a bunch of expensive **** that I would never actually ever need.

In light of just starting out with backpacking with a goal to do more, but without infinite financial resources, any suggestions on what gear is essential?

And I've always wondered, how the **** to you carry in enough water for multi day trips?
 

jallman

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Any experienced backpackers here?

I'm a day hiker, and multi-day camper, but I've never combined the two. Generally, I want to camp near my car. It's convenient. LOL

However, since I'd like to trek to at least Camp One of Everest someday, I figure I should do some backpacking to train. ;) Plus, it'll be good exercise. But, I'm honestly not sure where the hell to start. It would be all too easy to buy a bunch of expensive **** that I would never actually ever need.

In light of just starting out with backpacking with a goal to do more, but without infinite financial resources, any suggestions on what gear is essential?

And I've always wondered, how the **** to you carry in enough water for multi day trips?
Backpack with a small first aid kit, your tent, a blanket, water bottle, and your rations. Knife, matches and lighters, compass, flares and flare gun. Roll of aluminum foil and one small pan for cooking.

I cant think of anything else you might need for just a couple day trip. Maybe a fishing pole?
 

reefedjib

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scout out any springs on your trail for water. Take some iodine.
 

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However, since I'd like to trek to at least Camp One of Everest someday, I figure I should do some backpacking to train. ;) Plus, it'll be good exercise. But, I'm honestly not sure where the hell to start. It would be all too easy to buy a bunch of expensive **** that I would never actually ever need.
My boyfriend trekked to base camp at Everest. He told me that backpacking in that scenario is really kind of minimalist because it's set up to be hikeable. There are little villages and tea houses all the way up to base camp that are within walking distance of one another, so you shouldn't have to pack in food. Just bedding and clothing and hygiene essentials.
 

rivrrat

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Backpack with a small first aid kit, your tent, a blanket, water bottle, and your rations. Knife, matches and lighters, compass, flares and flare gun. Roll of aluminum foil and one small pan for cooking.

I cant think of anything else you might need for just a couple day trip. Maybe a fishing pole?
And my doggie! ;)

I'm figuring just a one night trip to start, but even then I need to get a pack with a lightweight tent and bedding. When I look into gear, there's just so much **** that's sooo high priced. And from experience in other outdoor activities, I know that I don't need all that high priced ****. I'm just not sure what's "good enough" as far as quality goes, I guess. Or even essential besides food and water. (I guess that's all I really need. LOL)

But you're probably right in that I'd only really require the few items you mentioned for a short trip.

scout out any springs on your trail for water. Take some iodine.
That's kind of what I figured. I was just wondering about places where there are no natural water sources. But I guess maybe you just avoid hiking those! LOL



Woot! I'll check them out.


My boyfriend trekked to base camp at Everest. He told me that backpacking in that scenario is really kind of minimalist because it's set up to be hikeable. There are little villages and tea houses all the way up to base camp that are within walking distance of one another, so you shouldn't have to pack in food. Just bedding and clothing and hygiene essentials.
But what about the next camp up, camp one? Did he hear anything about that or look into it?

I was hoping I could go at least that far. I don't really hold any illusions I could go further than that, but they recomend "mountaineer" training to get to camp 1. (apparently the most dangerous leg of Everest is between base camp and camp one) After camp 1 you need O2, so I don't plan on being in good enough shape and experience to do any further than that.
 

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water: The hand-pumped water filters are the way to go, just expensive. You can also boil your water if you want to save money and you have the time. Keep it at a boil for about 11 minutes--that covers all altitudes safely.

shelter: small tent. (smaller tents are generally warmer, sturdier, and lighter than big tents), sleeping bag

food: MRE's are nice (never thought i'd ever say that), beef jerky, trail mixes, energy bars, whatever else you want to haul out.

fire: matches, lighter, flint stick keychain -- carry all three, they are light and you will grow to love fire, if you haven't already.

protection: I second the 1st aid kit as mentioned above, and the knife, and whatever other protection you need (rev. gave good advice--get a concealed carry permit). or stun gun, maybe?

extra socks and good shoes, maybe some "moleskin" (TM) for blisters.

entertainment: harmonica


Also, I don't know how long you've been in Charlottesville--so you might already know-- but you ought to check out crabtree falls. Its a nice scenic day hike that's not too difficult, the trail is pretty well traveled (safe), and they are the highest falls east of the Mississippi--not straight down, but down an inclined mountain (if I remember correctly).

There's lots of good people on the AT, but a buncha weirdos too, so be aware.
 
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reefedjib

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Goshin

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Any experienced backpackers here?

I'm a day hiker, and multi-day camper, but I've never combined the two. Generally, I want to camp near my car. It's convenient. LOL

However, since I'd like to trek to at least Camp One of Everest someday, I figure I should do some backpacking to train. ;) Plus, it'll be good exercise. But, I'm honestly not sure where the hell to start. It would be all too easy to buy a bunch of expensive **** that I would never actually ever need.

In light of just starting out with backpacking with a goal to do more, but without infinite financial resources, any suggestions on what gear is essential?

And I've always wondered, how the **** to you carry in enough water for multi day trips?

I'm not exactly super-hiker, but I've done a good many multi-day hikes. Item one is don't over-estimate how much mileage you can hike in a day, and remember that "mountain miles" are WAY different than flatland miles! I often liked to set up a three-day "loop" that would bring us back to the vehicle without ever having to turn around and backtrack... but like I said don't overestimate your mileage! :doh:

Kelty is a good pack, a little pricey but well worth it. I've gone out with a large Alice pack (WITH kidney pad!) and it was fine for me, even if the "high speed low drag" hikers would sneer at it. (They're mil-surplus, cheap at any surplus store, not lightweight but very sturdy.)

Cooking: single-burner propane camp "stove" with one small propane cannister per 2 days, available at Wal-mart cheap. A lighter alternative is a little "white gas stove", price varies. One quart-size ordinary pot. Knife, fork, spoon. Maybe a few seasoning packets if you like. LOTS OF MATCHES! :)

Food: Instant grits for breakfast, for lunch something not too heavy that can just be eaten as-is (trail mix, ration bars, but TASTE 'em before you hike with 'em! Some are NASTY.) Supper... well it depends. Freeze-dried is nice, its low-weight and tasty but not cheap. Some go with Ramen noodles and a small (4-6oz) can of meat to go in it as an el-cheapo alternative.

Map, compass, alternative firestarter (I like magnesium blocks or Swedish firesteels), spare compass, for that matter a spare map aint a bad idea. EVEN IF you have a GPS, bring a frigging map!!! Maps don't run out of power or lose satellite signal!

Dryer lint for firestarting tinder. Pieces of egg-crate cardboard and some chunks of candle-wax work too.

Bring a medium-size knife AND a leatherman tool or other multitool. You will be glad you did.

Spare socks and laces.

A towel.


You can't carry enough water for more than a two day hike. You'll need either a water filter like a Katadyne pump, or else water purification tablets... or else spend a lot of time boiling water, or else take your girardia chances. I've done all the above... I don't like the way water purification tablets make the water taste. DO take a half-gallon of water with you, and make sure you know where your water sources will be along the trail.

That's my two bits anyway...

Oh yeah btw... building a good campfire is a skill. Maybe you already have that skill, if so great; if not practice it at home first. Have more than one way of lighting the fire. Have your own dry tinder kept in a dry container, and know how to find bits of dry wood in a wet forest. I went out one time in the winter alone and darn near froze to death getting a fire started in a damp forest. Spent half the night babying that thing along to keep from freezing.
 
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jallman

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Cause the Good Reverend lives on the wild side :pimpdaddy:



How u gonna fill in the hole?

Headlamps are a gift from the gods.
With the shovel sitting beside the hole, stuck in the dirt that came out it. :shrug:
 

rivrrat

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I don't know what you budget looks like but I went through a 21-day Outward Bound course when I was 16 and it was awesome!!! I highly, highly recommend them.

Here is an 8 day course for ages 30+ ($1400) Outward Bound Wilderness Expeditions - Blue Ridge Mountains Backpacking & Rock Climbing - Adult Renewal

Here is a 28-day course for ages 18-30 ($4000!) Outward Bound Wilderness Expeditions - Appalachian Mountains Backpacking, Rock Climbing & Whitewater Canoeing
The issue with the courses isn't so much money as it is time. I can't take that much time off work. There's a 3 day mountaineering course I'm planning on taking next year though. :mrgreen:

I LOVE headlamps. So fricken awesome. Mine got busted, I was planning on getting a new one.

And Jall, they're great because you don't have to carry a damn flashlight or lantern with you everywhere. :) We used them camping on the river because we had so much **** to do setting up camp, cooking, and cleaning up for 20 or more people. Having our hands free was kind of paramount to expediting said activities. I guess I got spoiled. ;) LOL


---

As for fire and food, I never really thought about that. I don't usually cook when I camp out. I just take veina sausages, beef jerky, packaged cheese and crackers, protein bars, granola, etc. Sometimes I build a fire, sometimes not. In the Mojave, I built a fire. It was WTF cold there at night. Holy ****ing ****. I was planning on buying a grill for car-camping, though. Just never even considered one for backpacking.

All good information, guys, thank you. Gives me a good place to start. :)
 

StandUpChuck

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Make sure someone knows you're going (and your route if possible) and approx. when to expect you back. If you are injured along the way and cannot walk, it's nice to know that at some point, someone will be looking for you, and they'll have a decent idea of where to look.

Have fun!
 

ReverendHellh0und

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Not a shovel...a foldable spade comes in handy though.

But yeah, you brought the shovel, not me.



:lol: true.....



Anyway, a headlamp is one of the best things to have with you. Even searching your ultralight backpack in night is much easier with two hands.
 

ludahai

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Any experienced backpackers here?

I'm a day hiker, and multi-day camper, but I've never combined the two. Generally, I want to camp near my car. It's convenient. LOL

However, since I'd like to trek to at least Camp One of Everest someday, I figure I should do some backpacking to train. ;) Plus, it'll be good exercise. But, I'm honestly not sure where the hell to start. It would be all too easy to buy a bunch of expensive **** that I would never actually ever need.

In light of just starting out with backpacking with a goal to do more, but without infinite financial resources, any suggestions on what gear is essential?

And I've always wondered, how the **** to you carry in enough water for multi day trips?
Can't give you much advice... I have only three experiences of 3-4 day hikes in Tennessee, North Carolina, and Georgia, but I want to wish you luck... that sounds like a cool goal...
 
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