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Australias First Saint

spud_meister

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Canonisation plans unveiled in Melbourne


The canonisation of Australia's first saint will be a momentous day for the nation, not just those of Catholic faith, Archbishop Denis Hart says.

Pope Benedict XVI will officially declare Mary MacKillop a saint at St Peter's Basilica in Rome on October 17, 2010 following a long campaign in Australia to have her legacy recognised.

Official plans for celebrations in Mary's birthplace of Melbourne were unveiled on Sunday.

yay, we be gettin' a saint, and she deserves to be canonised, she was a good person.

Mary MacKillop - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Andalublue

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Canonisation plans unveiled in Melbourne
yay, we be gettin' a saint, and she deserves to be canonised, she was a good person.
Good for her, it's a bit like a postumous OBE really, isn't it? I'm just not sure why Archbishop Hart thinks it will mean anything to non-Catholics. As John Wesley said:
" The Romish doctrine concerning...worshiping, and adoration, as well of images as of relics, and also invocation of saints, is a fond thing, vainly invented, and grounded upon no warrant of Scripture, but repugnant to the Word of God."
I'm not dissing Mary McKillop, I'm just saying that you have to believe in saints for canonisation to mean much.
 

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America only has seven saints, six of them canonized in 1975 or later.
The most famous is probably Mother Seton; St. Elizabeth Seton.
 

mac

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We don't worship saints and relics...

I wonder, will there be a move in Australia to make her the patron saint of the country?
Most non-Catholics don't understand the difference in Revering something and Worshiping something.
 

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Most non-Catholics don't understand the difference in Revering something and Worshiping something.
I think that John Wesley probably did understand that difference.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wesley

But don't feel persecuted, he was just as hard on Calvinists who, he said, through their ideas of predestination, show God to be worse than the devil. That was fighting talk in the 18th century.
 
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mac

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I think that John Wesley probably did understand that difference.

John Wesley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

But don't feel persecuted, he was just as hard on Calvinists who, he said, through their ideas of predestination, show God to be worse than the devil. That was fighting talk in the 18th century.
This is no different than Sainthood in reality:

Sanctification he described in 1790 as the "grand depositum which God has lodged with the people called `Methodists'." Wesley taught that sanctification was obtainable after justification by faith, between justification and death. He did not contend for "sinless perfection"; rather, he contended that a Christian could be made "perfect in love". (Wesley studied Eastern Orthodoxy and particularly the doctrine of Theosis). This love would mean, first of all, that a believer's motives, rather than being self-centred, would be guided by the deep desire to please God. One would be able to keep from committing what Wesley called, "sin rightly so-called." By this he meant a conscious or intentional breach of God's will or laws. A person could still be able to sin, but intentional or willful sin could be avoided.
Though he called it something else he, in fact, believed in it. I can only imagine that his spin had something to do with winning over Catholics and Anglicans to his own movement. All that being said, of Protestant Faiths, I'm more fond of Methodism than any other.
 
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Andalublue

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This is no different than Sainthood in reality
Depends on what you mean by sainthood. I grew up Anglican (mother's side) and Methodist (father's side) and would attend both church and chapel. I remember the Methodist Minister telling us that through faith and with grace we are all saints, no greater nor lesser in the eyes of God than St Peter.

Though he called it something else he, in fact, believed in it.
He certainly didn't believe in the Miss Universe canonisation industry. Could you offer some evidence that contradicts the quote in post 2?
 
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