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Arrest numbers in America

Integrityrespec

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Nationwide, law enforcement made an estimated 10,554,985 arrests in 2017. Of these arrests, 518,617 were for violent crimes, and 1,249,757 were for property crimes. (Note: the UCR Program does not collect data on citations for traffic violations.) (these were the latest figures I could find)

How do those wanting police reform and those who make charges of systemic racism believe police should handle arrest in violent situations and how should they deal with suspects who resist arrest or fail to comply with police commands?
 

CaughtInThe

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just don't shoot/kill people that shouldn't be shot/killed.


easy peasy.
 

TheParser

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And don't forget: Many violent crimes are not reported to the cops.

One reason is that the victim may feel that the cops are not going to put any effort into finding the culprit.

Another reason is that the victim may fear retribution if s/he goes to the cops.

This is a very violent country because there are a lot of violent individuals in this country. And they are getting more brazen by the day because of despicable politicians who abet their activities.

*****

I am so proud of President Trump for waiting for the facts to be brought out in this Wisconsin incident. So far, he has not joined the breast-beating by activists and opportunistic politicians. That takes guts in this political atmosphere.
 

Lutherf

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Near as I can tell there are about four times as many whites as there are blacks of hispanics. The simple thing to do would be to arrest 4 white people for every black or hispanic that commits a crime. If an Asian commits a crime then 10 white people should be arrested. That strikes me as being totally proportional. It really shouldn't be all that difficult for the cops to keep a spreadsheet with all the white people available for arrest in their district. When they arrest a person of color they should give that person the opportunity to select anyone they choose from the list as a form of reparations.
 

MovingPictures

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Nationwide, law enforcement made an estimated 10,554,985 arrests in 2017. Of these arrests, 518,617 were for violent crimes, and 1,249,757 were for property crimes. (Note: the UCR Program does not collect data on citations for traffic violations.) (these were the latest figures I could find)

How do those wanting police reform and those who make charges of systemic racism believe police should handle arrest in violent situations and how should they deal with suspects who resist arrest or fail to comply with police commands?
It depends.

You're conflating "failing to comply" and "resisting" as someone necessarily attacking an officer, when the vast majority of the time it's people simply trying to flee arrest. No, people shouldn't flee an arrest, but that is not a time when an officer can credibly claim to be in fear of their lives when they shoot to kill, as is required for lawful self defense to be applicable.

There are people who do stupid **** with police. I've seen people provoke otherwise professional police by refusing to give their ID's at traffic stops, refusing to sign tickets, brandishing weapons, etc, and then being shocked when police arrest them and get physical in a situation they socially engineered for YT, and I typically have no sympathy for those people when they get arrested.

Still, the vast majority of people don't understand that many techniques like bending fingers, twisting arms, squeezing necks, etc, are taught to by used by police in the academy with very little reason, and can give the appearance to the outside observer that someone is trying to resist. This is why cops are trained to scream "stop resisting!" when there are witnesses to their use of force, that can later be used as a defense in court, when the bad training is what escalating the situation.
 
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tylerTeach

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Nationwide, law enforcement made an estimated 10,554,985 arrests in 2017. Of these arrests, 518,617 were for violent crimes, and 1,249,757 were for property crimes. (Note: the UCR Program does not collect data on citations for traffic violations.) (these were the latest figures I could find)

How do those wanting police reform and those who make charges of systemic racism believe police should handle arrest in violent situations and how should they deal with suspects who resist arrest or fail to comply with police commands?

Nationwide, law enforcement made an estimated 10,554,985 arrests in 2017. Of these arrests, 518,617 were for violent crimes, and 1,249,757 were for property crimes. (Note: the UCR Program does not collect data on citations for traffic violations.) (these were the latest figures I could find)

How do those wanting police reform and those who make charges of systemic racism believe police should handle arrest in violent situations and how should they deal with suspects who resist arrest or fail to comply with police commands?

What this data reveals is that nationwide, law enforcement made 8,786,611 arrests for situations that were neither violent nor involved damage to property. More than 1.5 million of those arrests are for drug law violations, so if we're speaking more broadly about systemic racism in the criminal justice system, that's a major component. Some of Nixon's own aides have admitted that the war on drugs was instituted specifically to criminalize activity associated in the popular consciousness with black Americans (as well as members of the radical antiwar left). The findings are conclusive that black Americans, specifically black men, are arrested at a massively disproportionate rate for marijuana possession compared with their white counterparts, despite similar rates of usage (the difference in rates varies by area, but the gap persists in every region of the country, as high as 9 times more likely in some places, around 3.5x more likely on average). This can be ameliorated by treating drug 'crime' like the health crisis it is, rather than continuing to lock up users, but one other major factor influencing that disparity is the overpolicing of black and brown communities due to "broken windows" style police work. I realize that none of this answers the question, but it seemed like you might not be sold on the idea of systemic racism, so it seemed like a good start.

I believe that the duties of the police are far too wide reaching as things currently stand: many of the needs of the community for which police are currently responsible are not best served by law enforcement, and the police are overworked in that they're asked to do far more than they're trained for. I think that 911 calls should be dispatched to the most relevant department, whether that be detectives to respond to a crime scene or a separately run state organizations for traffic patrol, handling of mental illnesses, handling of drug abuse, or civil disputes. I also don't think any of these aforementioned actors should be armed, and I think more serious situations that require armed intervention should be handled by specialists who are called in, sorta like SWAT. These officers are only justified in using lethal force if it prevents further deaths: I mention this to differentiate between an active shooter refusing to comply and somebody running away, since the idea of "resisting arrest" could include a lot of different situations, and thus would require a wide range of approaches.
 
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