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Are Snap On, Mac, Matco & 'Cornwell(??) tools really THAT much better?

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My 1st-ever real job was at a machine shop that turned standard GM, Chrysler and Ford torque converters into high stall speed units, used in drag racing and street performance car applications. I worked there for almost 2.5 years, from the summer after my 10th grade school year, til a few months after graduating high school. We did not have to buy our own tools. During this time, I was paying for my own car, gasoline, insurance, some clothing etc. So I didn't have a ton of disposeable income.

We moved from a rural, 70' x 50' back yard shop, into a much larger shop in town. A Mac tools dealer started showing up in his tool truck weekly. I ended up buying a 1/2" drive ratchet, and a 10pc black coated set of SAE impact sockets(the chrome plates sockets were like $25 more!), paying over $90 for both in 1986.

They were nice tools. A few years later, at my next job, I allowed a co worker to use the ratchet for busting loose a few large, seized axle bearing nuts on a towed seeding combine, with a long breaker bar, and it was the only ratchet he tried that didnt break under the strain. The other tools were a cornucopia of different brands, but they were cheap and moderately priced brands.

I just looked up prices for top-o-the-line independent franchise type tool companies like Snap On and Cornell tools. I'll leave links to price lists from both companies below. A basic 10pc Snap On wrench set is $359, and it seems that Cornell tools can be even more expensive, with the same type of 10-12 pc set costing $378 to over $650! You can buy tools made by reputable companies, with a lifetime warranty for roughly 1/10 to 1/15th that price!

That begs the often asked question, are these tools really worth THAT MUCH money? Are they that much tougher? Is there a significant difference in quality between Snap On, Mac, Matco tools? What about Cornell tools, I know nothing about them?

https://www.bestproducts.com/cars/tools-and-DIY/g1916/snap-on-tools-kits/

Hand Tools - Wrenches - Combination Wrench Sets - Cornwell Webcat
 
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My 1st-ever real job was at a machine shop that turned standard GM, Chrysler and Ford torque converters into high stall speed units, used in drag racing and street performance car applications. I worked there for almost 2.5 years, from the summer after my 10th grade school year, til a few months after graduating high school. We did not have to buy our own tools. During this time, I was paying for my own car, gasoline, insurance, some clothing etc. So I didn't have a ton of disposeable income.

We moved from a rural, 70' x 50' back yard shop, into a much larger shop in town. A Mac tools dealer started showing up in his tool truck weekly. I ended up buying a 1/2" drive ratchet, and a 10pc black coated set of SAE impact sockets(the chrome plates sockets were like $25 more!), paying over $90 for both in 1986.

They were nice tools. I allowed a co worker to use the ratchet for busting loose a few large, seized axle bearing nuts on a towed seeding combine, with a long breaker bar, and it was the only ratchet he tried that didnt break under the strain. The other tools were a cornucopia of different brands, but none better than medium grade brands.

I just looked up prices for top-o-the-line independent franchise type tool companies like Snap On and Cornell tools. I'll leave links to price lists from both companies below. A basic 10pc Snap On wrench set is $359, and it seems that Cornell tools can be even more expensive, with the same type of 10-12 pc set costing $378 to over $650! You can buy tools made by reputable companies, with a lifetime warranty for roughly 1/10 to 1/15th that price!

That begs the often asked question, are these tools really worth THAT MUCH money? Are they that much tougher?

https://www.bestproducts.com/cars/tools-and-DIY/g1916/snap-on-tools-kits/

Hand Tools - Wrenches - Combination Wrench Sets - Cornwell Webcat

I spent over 30 years in the auto service business as tech, service advisor, business owner. When I started Craftsman were decent tools. The convenience of the various tool trucks that stop regularly and offer a payment plan is hard to beat. The financing is priced into the tool price. The best mark-up is on the tool cabinets and these are probably the single highest priced item. I found the Snap-On 3/8” ratchet with the screwdriver type handle to be the most comfortable. The throw was better than the others as well. By ‘throw’ I mean distance travelled before the tool clicks. There has been an upgrade in some of the vendors that circulate in
their personal truck with off brand selections.
 

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My 1st-ever real job was at a machine shop that turned standard GM, Chrysler and Ford torque converters into high stall speed units, used in drag racing and street performance car applications. I worked there for almost 2.5 years, from the summer after my 10th grade school year, til a few months after graduating high school. We did not have to buy our own tools. During this time, I was paying for my own car, gasoline, insurance, some clothing etc. So I didn't have a ton of disposeable income.

We moved from a rural, 70' x 50' back yard shop, into a much larger shop in town. A Mac tools dealer started showing up in his tool truck weekly. I ended up buying a 1/2" drive ratchet, and a 10pc black coated set of SAE impact sockets(the chrome plates sockets were like $25 more!), paying over $90 for both in 1986.

They were nice tools. A few years later, at my next job, I allowed a co worker to use the ratchet for busting loose a few large, seized axle bearing nuts on a towed seeding combine, with a long breaker bar, and it was the only ratchet he tried that didnt break under the strain. The other tools were a cornucopia of different brands, but they were cheap and moderately priced brands.

I just looked up prices for top-o-the-line independent franchise type tool companies like Snap On and Cornell tools. I'll leave links to price lists from both companies below. A basic 10pc Snap On wrench set is $359, and it seems that Cornell tools can be even more expensive, with the same type of 10-12 pc set costing $378 to over $650! You can buy tools made by reputable companies, with a lifetime warranty for roughly 1/10 to 1/15th that price!

That begs the often asked question, are these tools really worth THAT MUCH money? Are they that much tougher? Is there a significant difference in quality between Snap On, Mac, Matco tools? What about Cornell tools, I know nothing about them?

https://www.bestproducts.com/cars/tools-and-DIY/g1916/snap-on-tools-kits/

Hand Tools - Wrenches - Combination Wrench Sets - Cornwell Webcat

Check videos on line where good tools are compared with China made crap. I have used and abused my snap on and craftsman tools and rarely broke them. Can't say that for the other tools in my box.
 

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My 1st-ever real job was at a machine shop that turned standard GM, Chrysler and Ford torque converters into high stall speed units, used in drag racing and street performance car applications. I worked there for almost 2.5 years, from the summer after my 10th grade school year, til a few months after graduating high school. We did not have to buy our own tools. During this time, I was paying for my own car, gasoline, insurance, some clothing etc. So I didn't have a ton of disposeable income.

We moved from a rural, 70' x 50' back yard shop, into a much larger shop in town. A Mac tools dealer started showing up in his tool truck weekly. I ended up buying a 1/2" drive ratchet, and a 10pc black coated set of SAE impact sockets(the chrome plates sockets were like $25 more!), paying over $90 for both in 1986.

They were nice tools. A few years later, at my next job, I allowed a co worker to use the ratchet for busting loose a few large, seized axle bearing nuts on a towed seeding combine, with a long breaker bar, and it was the only ratchet he tried that didnt break under the strain. The other tools were a cornucopia of different brands, but they were cheap and moderately priced brands.

I just looked up prices for top-o-the-line independent franchise type tool companies like Snap On and Cornell tools. I'll leave links to price lists from both companies below. A basic 10pc Snap On wrench set is $359, and it seems that Cornell tools can be even more expensive, with the same type of 10-12 pc set costing $378 to over $650! You can buy tools made by reputable companies, with a lifetime warranty for roughly 1/10 to 1/15th that price!

That begs the often asked question, are these tools really worth THAT MUCH money? Are they that much tougher? Is there a significant difference in quality between Snap On, Mac, Matco tools? What about Cornell tools, I know nothing about them?

https://www.bestproducts.com/cars/tools-and-DIY/g1916/snap-on-tools-kits/

Hand Tools - Wrenches - Combination Wrench Sets - Cornwell Webcat

Depends on the tool, many are just rebranded gearwrench and lisle tools, some are top quality.


For example for corse tooth rathchets cornwell is king, smooth as butter and nearly unbreakable, however when it comes to fine tooth ratchets cornwell is junk as are snapon and everone else, but matco makes the best fine tooth ratchet, the second best would be gearwrench. In terms of wrenches cornwell makes the best oldschool ones but in reality you can buy sk proto etc and still be doing quite well without tool truck prices. Impact tools except for snapon are usually rebranded ingersall rand and chicago pneumatic.


As far as cornwell tools being more expensive, that is because their coarse tooth ratchets and their wrenches are hand made in the us, while snapon uses machine made ratchets and wrenches in the us. The process cornwell uses is very expensive, a person operates a power hammer and forges the product, then it goes to someone to file it down to shap and polish it, a human is there in all stages of production, this method is expensive and reflects on their price.


As far as mac do not buy, most of their tools are good but after stanley bought them their warranty went to crap, meaning if you break a ratchet they have to send it in wait a month or so for a rep to say you must have abused it no warranty, while snapon is far more lenient and matco and cornwell will usually ewplace them without asking questions or sending a forensics team.
 

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As with getting tools for any professional use, my best answer is "it depends". For the most commonly used (and thus abused) tools buy the best that you can afford and for those gotta have them but only occasionally (or rarely) need to use them then either rent (or borrow, if possible) them or buy less expensive but still decent quality tools. From my experience, "junk" (aka super discount) tools not only fail on you (Murphy seems to add - when you need them most) but are often going to get you hurt in the process.

I often rely on the reading (or watching) the many internet reviews and/or comparisons available to help make my "best brand for the buck" tool buying decisions.

https://toolguyd.com/usa-wrenches-ratchets-sockets-brands/
 
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As with getting tools for any professional use, my best answer is "it depends". For the most commonly used (and thus abused) tools buy the best that you can afford and for those gotta have them but only occasionally (or rarely) need to use them then either rent (or borrow, if possible) them or buy less expensive but still decent quality tools. From my experience, "junk" (aka super discount) tools not only fail on you (Murphy seems to add - when you need them most) but are often going to get you hurt in the process.

I often rely on the reading (or watching) the many internet reviews and/or comparisons available to help make my "best brand for the buck" tool buying decisions.

https://toolguyd.com/usa-wrenches-ratchets-sockets-brands/

Sometimes a cheap tool is more useful. An expensive screwdriver is only a screwdriver but a cheap one is a screwdriver and a pry-bar and a chipping hammer, too!

(only partly tongue-in-cheek!)
 

ttwtt78640

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Sometimes a cheap tool is more useful. An expensive screwdriver is only a screwdriver but a cheap one is a screwdriver and a pry-bar and a chipping hammer, too!

(only partly tongue-in-cheek!)

The problem is that, once abused (used for the wrong task), the tool is then likely no longer useful for its intended purpose.
 

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To gove example of let's say wrenches, wright is not top quality but they beat old craftsmen in quality and beat snapon in price, american made and around 200-250 for a set, not a tiny set but a large set full american made high quality. Sk is more expensive but I have never broken one, currently sk is more expensive than many tool truck offerings but they only sell us made tools, they refuse to outsource to other countries. Gearwrench is a taiwan made brand and a former company of matco, they are not number one but for the price they are very dependable and good on their warranty, just buy them from a reputable dealer, as there are numerous knockoffs that are junk plus they make two grades, their china made are cheap for the hobby mechanic and their more expensive taiwan made are geared towards professionals and much higher quality.


As far as hammers I buy vaughan, they are literally the same as snapon blue point matco craftsmen etc hammers without the markup and made in usa, and the heads do not fail, you will replace 50 wooden handles before the first head fails. Prybars you can buy mayhew, who makes them for matco and used to make for craftsmen, they are made in usa and far cheaper than snapon, and will literally match snapon in quality for a much smaller price if you buy them without the tool truck markup. For sockets sk makes awesome chrome sockets, harbor frieght or any chinese brand makes good large sized impact sockets for smaller better to go with sunnex taiwan sockets, and for swivel sockets go with matco snapon or cornwell for major names or gearwrench or sk for lesser names. The cheap swivel sockets never break pins but they use cheap collars which cause pins to fly out, I have harbor freight sockets with have outlasted snapon sockets, but I had to weld the pins in place to keep them from flying across the shop never to be seen again.

Fr screwdrivers klein makes them better than even snapon, witte makes the high end ones for matco and cornwell, you can save money by buying them from witte, and if you demand snapon screwdrivers williams sells them th exact same as snapon without the snapon logo for much less(snapon owns williams)
 

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My 1st-ever real job was at a machine shop that turned standard GM, Chrysler and Ford torque converters into high stall speed units, used in drag racing and street performance car applications. I worked there for almost 2.5 years, from the summer after my 10th grade school year, til a few months after graduating high school. We did not have to buy our own tools. During this time, I was paying for my own car, gasoline, insurance, some clothing etc. So I didn't have a ton of disposeable income.

We moved from a rural, 70' x 50' back yard shop, into a much larger shop in town. A Mac tools dealer started showing up in his tool truck weekly. I ended up buying a 1/2" drive ratchet, and a 10pc black coated set of SAE impact sockets(the chrome plates sockets were like $25 more!), paying over $90 for both in 1986.

They were nice tools. A few years later, at my next job, I allowed a co worker to use the ratchet for busting loose a few large, seized axle bearing nuts on a towed seeding combine, with a long breaker bar, and it was the only ratchet he tried that didnt break under the strain. The other tools were a cornucopia of different brands, but they were cheap and moderately priced brands.

I just looked up prices for top-o-the-line independent franchise type tool companies like Snap On and Cornell tools. I'll leave links to price lists from both companies below. A basic 10pc Snap On wrench set is $359, and it seems that Cornell tools can be even more expensive, with the same type of 10-12 pc set costing $378 to over $650! You can buy tools made by reputable companies, with a lifetime warranty for roughly 1/10 to 1/15th that price!

That begs the often asked question, are these tools really worth THAT MUCH money? Are they that much tougher? Is there a significant difference in quality between Snap On, Mac, Matco tools? What about Cornell tools, I know nothing about them?

https://www.bestproducts.com/cars/tools-and-DIY/g1916/snap-on-tools-kits/

Hand Tools - Wrenches - Combination Wrench Sets - Cornwell Webcat
It’s because SNA will finance the tool purchase that they charge that much. Go to a pawn shop and get them for 2/3rds off list.
 

beerftw

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It’s because SNA will finance the tool purchase that they charge that much. Go to a pawn shop and get them for 2/3rds off list.

Most pawn shops will not sell them 2/3rds off list unless they are in bad shape, the prices the tool trucks charge are identical or what you pay without the tool truck, this is done because the tool trucks are independant and need to make money, and they would make none if the same product was sold without the markup, they have to protect their dealers.

The pawn shops know this and try to price as high as they can towards truck price dependant on the shape of the tools, only a fool would sell a 400 dollar wrench set for 80 bucks knowing they could warranty it to get a brand new set if anything happened.
 

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Most pawn shops will not sell them 2/3rds off list unless they are in bad shape, the prices the tool trucks charge are identical or what you pay without the tool truck, this is done because the tool trucks are independant and need to make money, and they would make none if the same product was sold without the markup, they have to protect their dealers.

The pawn shops know this and try to price as high as they can towards truck price dependant on the shape of the tools, only a fool would sell a 400 dollar wrench set for 80 bucks knowing they could warranty it to get a brand new set if anything happened.
come on down to Houston. Complete stringer of craftsman sockets eight bucks. Snap-on 80. Ratchet 15.
 

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****. My Braker bar was 5 and that’s a snap-on
 

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come on down to Houston. Complete stringer of craftsman sockets eight bucks. Snap-on 80. Ratchet 15.

Sounds like you have the pawnshop unable to price.

Fyi I will not buy from pawnshops in houston, and if I do I call the dealer to run the numbers, too often they are so cheap because they are stolen and the pawn shop will kick you out for trying to run numbers.

I figured it out a while ago, a snapon verus that fully loaded nears 10k in price for 1500 buck, browsed though the pawn then called my local snapon dealer in centex, the scanner and the serial number was reported stolen, and when I mentioned it they threatened to kick me out for mentioning it was stolen. Since then I have never gone browsing pawn shops in houston, seem to me they were nothing more than resalers of stolen goods rather than honest business, while the pawn shops I have near me demand id phone number social etc for guns as well as anything they deem likely stolen so they have a paper trail to point to if it does prove to be stolen and they can direct authorities to who sold it to them.
 

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Sounds like you have the pawnshop unable to price.

Fyi I will not buy from pawnshops in houston, and if I do I call the dealer to run the numbers, too often they are so cheap because they are stolen and the pawn shop will kick you out for trying to run numbers.

I figured it out a while ago, a snapon verus that fully loaded nears 10k in price for 1500 buck, browsed though the pawn then called my local snapon dealer in centex, the scanner and the serial number was reported stolen, and when I mentioned it they threatened to kick me out for mentioning it was stolen. Since then I have never gone browsing pawn shops in houston, seem to me they were nothing more than resalers of stolen goods rather than honest business, while the pawn shops I have near me demand id phone number social etc for guns as well as anything they deem likely stolen so they have a paper trail to point to if it does prove to be stolen and they can direct authorities to who sold it to them.
The far majority of Houston pawn shops are either owned by or staffed by cops.
 

Tom Horn

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Anyway, my poor not is, they start so artificially high because if you look at SNAs quarterly SEC report, a full one half of their revenue is from financing.
 

Tom Horn

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Then houston has the most crooked cops in the nation

I never said they weren’t. But when I show the judge what I bought was from a cop, I’m off the hook. ( I’d rather own it new out of the factory box. But 385 or 105.........hmmmmm......
 

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Depends on the tool, many are just rebranded gearwrench and lisle tools, some are top quality.


For example for corse tooth rathchets cornwell is king, smooth as butter and nearly unbreakable, however when it comes to fine tooth ratchets cornwell is junk as are snapon and everone else, but matco makes the best fine tooth ratchet, the second best would be gearwrench. In terms of wrenches cornwell makes the best oldschool ones but in reality you can buy sk proto etc and still be doing quite well without tool truck prices. Impact tools except for snapon are usually rebranded ingersall rand and chicago pneumatic.


As far as cornwell tools being more expensive, that is because their coarse tooth ratchets and their wrenches are hand made in the us, while snapon uses machine made ratchets and wrenches in the us. The process cornwell uses is very expensive, a person operates a power hammer and forges the product, then it goes to someone to file it down to shap and polish it, a human is there in all stages of production, this method is expensive and reflects on their price.


As far as mac do not buy, most of their tools are good but after stanley bought them their warranty went to crap, meaning if you break a ratchet they have to send it in wait a month or so for a rep to say you must have abused it no warranty, while snapon is far more lenient and matco and cornwell will usually ewplace them without asking questions or sending a forensics team.

That's primarily what I use, Gear Wrench, Craftsman, Channel Lock, Irwin, Stanley, Crescent, Kobalt, etc.
 

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The far majority of Houston pawn shops are either owned by or staffed by cops.

So, what's the law in Texas pertaining to buying and possessing a set of tools bought legitimately from a pawn shop, that end up being stolen goods? Can you legitimately be charged with a crime for owning them, even with the pawn shop receipt?
 

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Sounds like you have the pawnshop unable to price.

Fyi I will not buy from pawnshops in houston, and if I do I call the dealer to run the numbers, too often they are so cheap because they are stolen and the pawn shop will kick you out for trying to run numbers.

I figured it out a while ago, a snapon verus that fully loaded nears 10k in price for 1500 buck, browsed though the pawn then called my local snapon dealer in centex, the scanner and the serial number was reported stolen, and when I mentioned it they threatened to kick me out for mentioning it was stolen. Since then I have never gone browsing pawn shops in houston, seem to me they were nothing more than resalers of stolen goods rather than honest business, while the pawn shops I have near me demand id phone number social etc for guns as well as anything they deem likely stolen so they have a paper trail to point to if it does prove to be stolen and they can direct authorities to who sold it to them.

Speaking of conspiracy to sell stolen Snap On tools, here's a story I ran into recently, after watching a drag racing wheelstand tournament. A guy named Brian Ambrosini is a repeat champion in a midwest wheelie championship. But while reading the comments below the video, I learned that he had been arrested back in like 2015 for stealing a bunch of Snap On tool cabinets straight from their warehouse, then selling them on eBay for like 75% off! https://bangshift.com/general-news/byron-wheelstanding-champ-brian-ambrosini-facing-up-to-32-years-in-prison-for-burglary-and-theft/


 

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One hint for high quality tools for cheap....

Estate sales.

One gentleman passed on after decades of working on electrical systems. He was often on call and if he couldn't find the tools he needed in a short time he would stop at Sears on the way to the job and buy new ones. Why waste an hour looking for a ratchet when you are paid many times it's worth per hour?

He ended up Craftsman tools by the buckets full.... Buckets of high quality drill bits and tap and die sets...

The wife knew to charge a fair but low price. I restocked and replaced many of my US tools (he didn't do metric)....
 

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So, what's the law in Texas pertaining to buying and possessing a set of tools bought legitimately from a pawn shop, that end up being stolen goods? Can you legitimately be charged with a crime for owning them, even with the pawn shop receipt?

The purchase is in their register. Anything that’s ever been bought and or sold is in a stores register.
 

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Speaking of conspiracy to sell stolen Snap On tools, here's a story I ran into recently, after watching a drag racing wheelstand tournament. A guy named Brian Ambrosini is a repeat champion in a midwest wheelie championship. But while reading the comments below the video, I learned that he had been arrested back in like 2015 for stealing a bunch of Snap On tool cabinets straight from their warehouse, then selling them on eBay for like 75% off! https://bangshift.com/general-news/byron-wheelstanding-champ-brian-ambrosini-facing-up-to-32-years-in-prison-for-burglary-and-theft/




Around here is is usually scan tools, tool boxes, ac recover machines etc, all high dollar stuff. Problem is though that even though a wrench set is easy to steal and get away with, high end items like those have serial numbers, especially with scanners. This means lets say you steal a 10k scanner like a verus your snapon dealer and corporate have records of it and can report it stolen. Some places know full well the bulk of their sales are stolen, and keep dealing in such.

I live under the idea if it is too good to be true it must be, after all I watched in the military as a soldier was interogated by cid over a snapon toolbox loaded with tools, they charged him with nothing but confiscated the tools, all with military serial numbers. The guy he bought it from got raided by the mp's and cid, and they found probably a few hundred k in stolen items from the military, not just hand tools but things like a-frames generators complete hmmwv engines etc. Snapon for a long time even had a serial number unique to the military uses just to deter theft they would not warranty the military tools for anyone but the military.
 
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Around here is is usually scan tools, tool boxes, ac recover machines etc, all high dollar stuff. Problem is though that even though a wrench set is easy to steal and get away with, high end items like those have serial numbers, especially with scanners. This means lets say you steal a 10k scanner like a verus your snapon dealer and corporate have records of it and can report it stolen. Some places know full well the bulk of their sales are stolen, and keep dealing in such.

I live under the idea if it is too good to be true it must be, after all I watched in the military as a soldier was interogated by cid over a snapon toolbox loaded with tools, they charged him with nothing but confiscated the tools, all with military serial numbers. The guy he bought it from got raided by the mp's and cid, and they found probably a few hundred k in stolen items from the military, not just hand tools but things like a-frames generators complete hmmwv engines etc. Snapon for a long time even had a serial number unique to the military uses just to deter theft they would not warranty the military tools for anyone but the military.

So, the US military buys Snap On tools? Well, at least that way they can legitimately claim to have paid $1000 for a hammer!! Maybe this explains where those missing trillions of tax dollars went. They probably just bought a few dozen fully stocked Snap On rolling tool chests!
 

Irwin Corey

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My 1st-ever real job was at a machine shop that turned standard GM, Chrysler and Ford torque converters into high stall speed units, used in drag racing and street performance car applications. I worked there for almost 2.5 years, from the summer after my 10th grade school year, til a few months after graduating high school. We did not have to buy our own tools. During this time, I was paying for my own car, gasoline, insurance, some clothing etc. So I didn't have a ton of disposeable income.

We moved from a rural, 70' x 50' back yard shop, into a much larger shop in town. A Mac tools dealer started showing up in his tool truck weekly. I ended up buying a 1/2" drive ratchet, and a 10pc black coated set of SAE impact sockets(the chrome plates sockets were like $25 more!), paying over $90 for both in 1986.

They were nice tools. A few years later, at my next job, I allowed a co worker to use the ratchet for busting loose a few large, seized axle bearing nuts on a towed seeding combine, with a long breaker bar, and it was the only ratchet he tried that didnt break under the strain. The other tools were a cornucopia of different brands, but they were cheap and moderately priced brands.

I just looked up prices for top-o-the-line independent franchise type tool companies like Snap On and Cornell tools. I'll leave links to price lists from both companies below. A basic 10pc Snap On wrench set is $359, and it seems that Cornell tools can be even more expensive, with the same type of 10-12 pc set costing $378 to over $650! You can buy tools made by reputable companies, with a lifetime warranty for roughly 1/10 to 1/15th that price!

That begs the often asked question, are these tools really worth THAT MUCH money? Are they that much tougher? Is there a significant difference in quality between Snap On, Mac, Matco tools? What about Cornell tools, I know nothing about them?

https://www.bestproducts.com/cars/tools-and-DIY/g1916/snap-on-tools-kits/

Hand Tools - Wrenches - Combination Wrench Sets - Cornwell Webcat

IMHO, though I can only speak for SnapOn … Yes! IF they are tools you will use a lot ~ everyday, yep, they're worth it. I don't think your whole box has to be ALL (top brand of your choice) but the ones you use everyday … you bet. They work better (even if it's only marginally), they last and they are (IMHO) a pleasure just to hold and look at; which is worth something right there.

(no I'm not a mechanic and never was, but my brother was. I inherited his tools an that right there makes them priceless, they're SnapOn and every time I pick one up it's a joy to my heart. Functionally they're better than anything else I've ever used.)
 
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