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Are name brands superior?

I'm Supposn

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Are name brands superior?

Possibly my palate isn’t as discriminating that of many other people. I often cannot detect any appreciable differences of tastes or other attributes between many “name brand” products. For some products I actually do detect a difference and prefer the “generic house brand to the name brand (without even considering any difference in cost).

I don’t recall what food product it was that I (untypically) determined that a “packer’s label” food product I purchased at a “Key Food” super market was inferior to name brands of a similar type product.

[Generic House brands are the store’s own label. I believe chain stores often purchased from the same producer as the name brand. I also believe that in most cases the purchasing orders specify the exact quality as the “name brand” and it’s conceivable that the purchasing order’s specification explicitly refer to the competing name brand by its advertised name.
Packers’ labels are excess or additional products that were branded with the producer’s own (rather than the advertised name brand label).
In all of these cases there’s substantial cost savings due to production lines’ economies of (greater) scales and little if any advertising expenses)]. The store obtains their house brand products at a cheaper price due to the leverage of the store chain’s large purchasing quantities and/or there’s little or no advertising expenses attributed to the each per unit of the non-name branded product].

Someone, (I think it might have been Voltaire) who wrote “In questions of taste there should be no argument”. On occasion I do encounter some products that I do detect, appreciate and am willing to pay the difference for the “name brand”. There are other products that I appreciate the difference but I’m unwilling or in some cases unable to pay the difference in price.

I like marmalade and very much prefer the less sweet English marmalade. We use so much of it in our household and the difference in price is so great that I sacrifice the superior taste and purchase the American house brand marmalade.
When I was a smoker, I did find an acceptable lesser if generally unknown brand of cigars; I don’t trust my memory but I think it might have been named “El Cuno”. There was only one place I found it and they didn’t carry the more superior that I prefer. I originally bought a few until I could obtain the better cigars I was accustomed to. Even after I became aware of this cigar’s quality, I continued to prefer spending the additional cost for a better cigar.

Early in our marriage, our landlord wanted to us to vacate. He wanted the apartment for his own family's member. I was a stepfather with 2 children. A house rather than another apartment seemed a more practical choice. When we moved, we didn’t even have the price of furniture.

We threw “bottle parties”. We served buffets on the kitchen table. My wife prepared the food herself and it we served buffets on from our kitchen table. It was (BYOB), Bring Your Own Bottles parties. People generally do not take unfinished bottles with them when they leave.

One rainy cold evening after the children were asleep, my wife and I decided to have a blind cognac tasting. We watch poured cognac in small paper cups marked with different letters. Neither one knew what brands were being poured in each of our sets of cups. We then tasted the contents of teach others’ set of cups and noted the letters of each cup in the order of our taste evaluations.

The only non-major cognac brand that was among our top four preferences was (I believe recalling) “Gold leaf” cognac; but gold leaf was also approaching the prices of the major brands.
There was little to choose between the tastes of Remny or Couvoursair cognacs. They were both excellent and very far superior to Hennessey’s cognac. All three of those cognacs sell for similar prices but unlike Hennessey’s, the other two have a much lesser USA advertising budgets. Hennessey’s is the much more advertised cognac in the USA.
It was clear to my wife and myself that Hennessey was heavily investing for advertising at the expense of their product’s quality. It was obviously a greatly inferior product among the major cognac brands sold within the USA.

Many Americans do not know that you can pay more for some things and still remain with much inferior product. Madison Avenue would prefer we believe they promote better products rather than that they in most cases promote higher distribution prices and/or inferior quality products for the sake of increased advertising budgets.

Respectfully, Supposn
 
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RabidAlpaca

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I can almost never tell a difference between name brands and the cheap store brands. I have a cheap local store brand I love that is the same exact food as the name brands, just sold under a different label for less than half the cost.

I want to put my money in things that will last, I don't want to eat my money, so for me cheaper is almost always better.
 

ttwtt78640

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Are name brands superior?

Possibly my palate isn’t as discriminating that of many other people. I often cannot detect any appreciable differences of tastes or other attributes between many “name brand” products. For some products I actually do detect a difference and prefer the “generic house brand to the name brand (without even considering any difference in cost).

I don’t recall what food product it was that I( untypical usual for me), determined that a “packer’s label” food product I purchased at a “Key Food” super market was inferior to name brands of a similar type product.

[Generic House brands are the store’s own label. I believe chain stores often purchased from the same producer as the name brand. I also believe that in most cases the purchasing orders specify the exact quality as the “name brand” and it’s conceivable that the purchasing order’s specification explicitly refer to the competing name brand by its advertised name.
Packers’ labels are excess or additional products that were branded with the producer’s own (rather than the advertised name brand label).
In all of these cases there’s substantial cost savings due to production lines’ economies of (greater) scales and little if any advertising expenses)]. The store obtains their house brand products at a cheaper price due to the leverage of the store chain’s large purchasing quantities and/or there’s little or no advertising expenses attributed to the each per unit of the non-name branded product].

Someone, (I think it might have been Voltaire) who wrote “In questions of taste there should be no argument”. On occasion I do encounter some products that I do detect, appreciate and am willing to pay the difference for the “name brand”. There are other products that I appreciate the difference but I’m unwilling or in some cases unable to pay the difference in price.

I like marmalade and very much prefer the less sweet English marmalade. We use so much of it in our household and the difference in price is so great that I sacrifice the superior taste and purchase the American house brand marmalade.
When I was a smoker, I did find an acceptable lesser if generally unknown brand of cigars; I don’t trust my memory but I think it might have been named “El Cuno”. There was only one place I found it and they didn’t carry the more superior that I prefer. I originally bought a few until I could obtain the better cigars I was accustomed to. Even after I became aware of this cigar’s quality, I continued to prefer spending the additional cost for a better cigar.

Early in our marriage, our landlord wanted to us to vacate. He wanted the apartment for his own family's member. I was a stepfather with 2 children. A house rather than another apartment seemed a more practical choice. When we moved, we didn’t even have the price of furniture.

We threw “bottle parties”. We served buffets on the kitchen table. My wife prepared the food herself and it we served buffets on from our kitchen table. It was (BYOB), Bring Your Own Bottles parties. People generally do not take unfinished bottles with them when they leave.

One rainy cold evening after the children were asleep, my wife and I decided to have a blind cognac tasting. We watch poured cognac in small paper cups marked with different letters. Neither one knew what brands were being poured in each of our sets of cups. We then tasted the contents of teach others’ set of cups and noted the letters of each cup in the order of our taste evaluations.

The only non-major cognac brand that was among our top four preferences was (I believe recalling) “Gold leaf” cognac; but gold leaf was also approaching the prices of the major brands.
There was little to choose between the tastes of Remny or Couvoursair cognacs. They were both excellent and very far superior to Hennessey’s cognac. All three of those cognacs sell for similar prices but unlike Hennessey’s, the other two have a much lesser USA advertising budgets. Hennessey’s is the much more advertised cognac in the USA.
It was clear to my wife and myself that Hennessey was heavily investing for advertising at the expense of their product’s quality. It was obviously a greatly inferior product among the major cognac brands sold within the USA.

Many Americans do not know that you can pay more for some things and still remain with much inferior product. Madison Avenue would prefer we believe they promote better products rather than that they in most cases promote higher distribution prices and/or inferior quality products for the sake of increased advertising budgets.

Respectfully, Supposn
Many times the only reason that "name brand" products cost more is due to the cost of advertizing them and that the retailer gets a slightly higher profit margin from selling them, so they get prime display/shelf space. I like your idea of doing your own blind taste tests. If the "substitute" brands are acceptable (or better) in quality/taste, and save you money as well, then you win on two fronts.
 

Captain Adverse

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Once upon a time a maker put their name on a product as a mark of pride in the quality of what was produced. Now it is just a gimmick, and has as little effect on the quality of a product as labeling the cheesy product whatever market researchers think will appeal most to the common consumer.
 
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Donc

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Somethings/sometimes name brands are worth the price.For one thing you will find less stems in a can of name brand green beans,if you don't mind eating more fiber with your green beans enjoy.:2wave:
 

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For food, usually not so much. In my industry (retail/electronics) name brands are almost always better, although whether they are worth the price difference is up to the individual.
 

GottaGo

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Generic works for some things but i have found that sometimes its not the product as much as the physical packaging. It seems some house brands dont package as well to retain freshness. Just one of the aspects i look at.
 

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In typical grocery items I have to experiment because some generic stuff is as good or even occasionally better, especially plastic bags, paper plates and certain paper goods. Never buy generic peanut butter.

On larger department store items I've learned never to buy the very cheapest just a level or two above that is usually okay.
 

ttwtt78640

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In typical grocery items I have to experiment because some generic stuff is as good or even occasionally better, especially plastic bags, paper plates and certain paper goods. Never buy generic peanut butter.

On larger department store items I've learned never to buy the very cheapest just a level or two above that is usually okay.
Dish washing soap is one item that often makes it worthwhile to pay a little more per ounce for a name brand (Dawn Ultra 2x) than the for generic brands - you can use a couple of drops of the name brand product while it takes a nearly tablespoon of the generic stuff to get the job done.
 

ttwtt78640

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For food, usually not so much. In my industry (retail/electronics) name brands are almost always better, although whether they are worth the price difference is up to the individual.
There is dfinitely an advantage to buying dependable name brands, backed by decent warranties and having service/repair facilities/parts available for some bigger ticket items. Getting a bad box of corn flakes is not the same as getting a bad appliance or tool that you must then replace since it cannot be repaired.
 

grip

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Dish washing soap is one item that often makes it worthwhile to pay a little more per ounce for a name brand (Dawn Ultra 2x) than the for generic brands - you can use a couple of drops of the name brand product while it takes a nearly tablespoon of the generic stuff to get the job done.
I found that true. Some less expensive, dishwasher detergents leave more residue on the dishes. Laundry soap I can go with a brand just above the cheapest. I don't get my clothes very dirty though.
 

Carjosse

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Things I don't buy generic are drinks and electronics. Drinks if they are not brand name usually taste horrible.
 

I'm Supposn

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Things I don't buy generic are drinks and electronics. Drinks if they are not brand name usually taste horrible.
Observer92, my experience with cognacs only indicated that Hennessey is apparently spends more on advertisement to the detriment of their product’s quality. It was not superior but possibly inferior to the much lesser known, “Gold Leaf” brand of cognac. Gold Leaf’s price wasn’t significantly cheaper (than the major brands). That did not induce me not to spend the additional price for Remy or Courvoisier cognacs.
In the case of cognacs, price matters but if you don’t know what your purchasing, price does not insure better quality.

Among domestic beers, I always enjoyed “Carlings Black label”. When they cut their advertising budget, it certainly reduced the beer’s price but they retained its quality.
I never developed what my youngest son believes to be his more discriminating palate and he often said the black label that I preferred among domestic beers was so bad that “you don’t even find their empties along the side of roads”. I can no longer obtain Carling’s Black label and if I'm choosing among domestic beers, I choose “Miller Draft”. I prefer paying the addition to price for Dominican Republic’s “Presidente” beer.

Growing up in Bronx, NY city, I’m nostalgic and prefer the taste of “Dr. Brown’s celery flavored soda. I can obtain that brand’s soda but can no longer obtain that flavor so I no longer purchase that brand. I prefer less sweet tasting sodas so I always dilute all flavored sodas with seltzer. Due to the extent of that dilution, house brand sodas taste no different than similar flavored major brands.

I much prefer and pay the additional price for Heinz vegetarian baked beans rather than purchasing any other vegetarian baked beans.
Other than these afore exceptions, I’m not fussy and generally find house brand foods and drinks completely acceptable.

Respectfully, Supposn
 

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Somethings/sometimes name brands are worth the price.For one thing you will find less stems in a can of name brand green beans,if you don't mind eating more fiber with your green beans enjoy.:2wave:
Aside from beans and potatoes, I don't eat canned veggies but I've found that store-branded frozen veggies are not as good as name-branded ones.
 

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This came up on another board.

Apparently, there're at least a couple of levels of generics. The first level is essentially the same as the name brand. The second is not quite up to the same standard, but still "acceptable."


###########################

Sometimes the difference isn't in the product itself, but some other aspect of the packaging. I knew a lady who ran a little cleaning business who used name brand spray bottles (w/ the labels removed) but filled them with bulk off-brand cleaning products. Her opinion was that while the cleaning products were indistinguishable except for the price, the dispenser bottles of the name brand were noticeably better and longer lasting.
 

I'm Supposn

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Manufacturers’ and extended warranties.

For food, usually not so much. In my industry (retail/electronics) name brands are almost always better, although whether they are worth the price difference is up to the individual.
Manufacturers’ and extended warranties.


Still Ballin 75, I’ll be 76 and it has been too many years since I could depend upon doing it.

I lean more toward your comment, “although whether they are worth the price difference is up to the individual”.

Additional costs for extended warranties or major brand of smaller lesser priced electrical or electronic devices are unwarranted. Much of their mechanism is encased within almost or entirely unopenable plastic and cannot be repaired. But I’m very fussy about devices or components that are to be installed within the house or car in a manner that requires a greater effort or expense to remove and replace.

I try to avoid multi task devices where one component’s failure makes then device of much less value to me and/or the complexity of additional features (that I generally have no pressing need for), greatly reduces the duration between the device’s purchase and failure date. Too often the apparent economy of multi-¬task devices is a false economy. I’m a proponent of KISS; (i.e. Keep It Simple, stupid).

Respectfully, Supposn

 

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A lot of generic food items are produced by the same company the produces the name brand.


This is also true outside of food items. Take, for instance, gassoline. The tanker that fills the tanks at my store (BJs wholesale) goes to the shell station 100 yards down the road, right after us, and fills their tanks.


True story.
 

PirateMk1

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For food, usually not so much. In my industry (retail/electronics) name brands are almost always better, although whether they are worth the price difference is up to the individual.
You damn skippy. I have been burned by little known brands of electronics so much that I am very leery of trying anything other the leading manufactures anymore. I did make a leap with Vizio and I must say I was well rewarded. I am very careful when I by electronics now from new suppliers. I do a lot of research before I buy electronics now. I have got buying laptops down to a science now. I usually go with a Clevo laptop. Clevo is a major manufacturer that supplies the likes of Sager, Prostar, Alienware, ect.
 

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A lot of generic food items are produced by the same company the produces the name brand.


This is also true outside of food items. Take, for instance, gassoline. The tanker that fills the tanks at my store (BJs wholesale) goes to the shell station 100 yards down the road, right after us, and fills their tanks.


True story.
All local gas comes from the nearest refinery. The only difference is the additive package.
 

PirateMk1

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Dish washing soap is one item that often makes it worthwhile to pay a little more per ounce for a name brand (Dawn Ultra 2x) than the for generic brands - you can use a couple of drops of the name brand product while it takes a nearly tablespoon of the generic stuff to get the job done.
Most of the "soaps" people use are actually detergents which generally are petroleum based. I prefer soaps which are based on fats. They are easier on your skin by far and they don't overclean your clothes in the case of laundry soap. Laundry detergents tend to over time break down your clothes. That's a lot of why you get a bunch of lint in the lint screen of the dryer. I use Five Star brand out of California they service the local service industry with their soaps. Its good stuff and fairly inexpensive compared to detergents. Not to mention if you have skin allergies you should try it. My skin don't tolerate what it used to and when I went to it a lot of my rashes went away. Whenever I have to use a detergent for a period of more than a couple of times then the rashes comeback.
 

I'm Supposn

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This came up on another board.

Apparently, there're at least a couple of levels of generics. The first level is essentially the same as the name brand. The second is not quite up to the same standard, but still "acceptable."
###########################

Sometimes the difference isn't in the product itself, but some other aspect of the packaging. I knew a lady who ran a little cleaning business who used name brand spray bottles (w/ the labels removed) but filled them with bulk off-brand cleaning products. Her opinion was that while the cleaning products were indistinguishable except for the price, the dispenser bottles of the name brand were noticeably better and longer lasting.

Simon W. Moon, you raise a germane point. I’m willing and often do pay some additional cost for more convenient or better performing packaging.

I appreciate resealable packages, packaging of more convenient portion sizes, plastic rather than cellophane packages that are not durable. I appreciate plastic containers that I use to store screws or other small parts.

I’d much prefer 8 Oz and 16 Oz beverage containers. Twelve oz. are too small and I finish it well before I finish my meal. When you have a party you have half finished 12 Oz. beverage containers all over the house. It’s almost inevitable that someone will spill one of them and mess up something of value.

Take out coffee is often served in 10 Oz. containers. I’d appreciate 2 more rather than 2 less Oz. of coffee. Why don’t restaurants set a price for insulated carafes of sufficient size so we don’t have to wait for a bus boy or waiter to bring our table more hot coffee?

Many sandwich shops no longer serve coffee after breakfast. I enjoy coffee with their fresh made to order sandwiches. If there’s no more convenient place, I will order and pay for my sandwich which they hold for me behind the counter while I go a few stores away to purchase a pint of black coffee to go. This is a loss of additional revenue for the sandwich shop, it’s actually not worth the while for the coffee house (that serves pastry but not sandwiches) and it’s an inconvenience to me.

Respectfully, Supposn
 

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Are name brands superior?
I think it depends on the product. For example, from personal experience Tide laundry detergent is superior to other detergents we've used. Not only does it work better, but it helps the clothes maintain their color. Some cheap detergents we've used actually turned whites yellow over time, for example. Procter and Gamble's spent a lot of money researching and patenting their detergents.
 

I'm Supposn

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Tools.

There is dfinitely an advantage to buying dependable name brands, backed by decent warranties and having service/repair facilities/parts available for some bigger ticket items. ... or tool (a) tool that you must then replace since it cannot be repaired.
Ttwtt78640, I do still use tools. I often find it necessary to purchase tools I cannot find in our garage. It’s storage space for our entire extended family. Much of the stuff in our garage belongs to family members who don’t live in our house and I can’t keep track of who has what within our home or their homes.

You don’t want a tool that cannot do the job, (i.er. a screw driver of the wrong size that strips the screw head or a drill bit that breaks within something that requires great effort and/or expense to rectify the damage). I have bought tools in a 99 cents store because the store’s convenient and there’s a great cost or inconvenience for not finishing the job ASAP.

I recently destroyed the first power tool I ever bought because I couldn’t find the chuck key and I if I didn’t complete the job that night, my wife would learn what I was doing and prevent me from doing it. I destroyed the chuck by over tightening it using two big pliers.

I just purchased a cheap 3/8” drill at my cousin’s house to do her job. I bought a wire stripper and crimping tool at a 99 cents store because my tool was too big to reach the end of the wire that had to have the connector better crimped. The tool broke while I was using it but not before I succeeded to firmly crimp that connector.

When the stores were closed or not nearby, I spent too much time fashioning a crimping tool by wrapping and holding a wire hanger onto pliers with duct tape. A proper tool wasn’t available at the job site.

Particularly if I don’t have the use of a vehicle, I can’t carry or anticipate every tool or part that I may require. Frequently I don’t have a vehicle to carry it all.
If I use the truck with commercial plates, I have a serious parking problem after 9 PM and I cannot use the parkways. I‘m often dependent upon what I can carry on public transportation.

I additionally purchase and do very well with what’s considered as junk from nearby 99 cents stores. The big box stores are driving the local hardware stores out of business. When they fully succeed, you can forget about any customer services or discount prices.

Respectfully, Supposn
 

Paschendale

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For lack of a more complete answer: "Sometimes".

Generic antihistamines are just fine, but I would never buy dinner rolls that weren't made by Pillsbury. It obviously depends on the product.
 
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