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Any diabetics here?

kal-el

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I have type 1 diabetes, and had it for about 13 years or so. I take a shot of regular and nph twice daily. I was thinking about getting an insulin pump, as I have heard nothing but good things about it, but in order for my insurance to cover it, I have to provide numerous documentation, in other words, they would rather have you take 4 shots a day, then to benefit from science advances.
 

alphieb

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kal-el said:
I have type 1 diabetes, and had it for about 13 years or so. I take a shot of regular and nph twice daily. I was thinking about getting an insulin pump, as I have heard nothing but good things about it, but in order for my insurance to cover it, I have to provide numerous documentation, in other words, they would rather have you take 4 shots a day, then to benefit from science advances.
My best friend has juvenile diabetes and has had it for 15 years. She has a pump and loves it. Do you have a good doctor? Your Doctor can provide the information needed to provide you with that pump. Type I Diabetes is very serious. That is one of the worst disorders you can have. It affects almost every organ in your body. High glucose and carb levels harden your arteries and glucose is converted into fat which creates PAD and heart problems. You would greatly benefit from that pump, sometimes its hard to discipline yourself to control your diabetes. That is where the pump comes in. Plus its a hassle to take those shots, what if you are in public.
 

kal-el

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alphieb said:
My best friend has juvenile diabetes and has had it for 15 years. She has a pump and loves it. Do you have a good doctor? Your Doctor can provide the information needed to provide you with that pump. Type I Diabetes is very serious. That is one of the worst disorders you can have. It affects almost every organ in your body. High glucose and carb levels harden your arteries and glucose is converted into fat which creates PAD and heart problems. You would greatly benefit from that pump, sometimes its hard to discipline yourself to control your diabetes. That is where the pump comes in. Plus its a hassle to take those shots, what if you are in public.
I'm pretty much used to taking the shots, it's almost second nature. It's not even painful, it's nothing more than an inconvience. I'm supposed to monitor my blood sugar levels 4x a day, but I don't even remember the last time I checked. Ususally I can feel if they are high or low. I must be doing a good job, because my H1c was 6.5. Yes, I have a descent doctor, but he doesn't have a magic wand, I still need to go thru insurance, as it is expensive. I think next year I will switch my insurance to one that covers the pump.
 

bandaidwoman

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strange, almost all insurance companies I deal with will cover an insulin pump for type I or type 1.5 diabetics (latent autoimmune adult diabetes), but not type IIs. This was based on a famous study that showed insulin pump therapy was superior to multiple shot regimines for prevention of diabetic complications. In fact, socialized medical countries like Great Britain automatically cover insulin pumps for their type I because they know they will save money in the long run. Some may stipulate that you need to have at least two documented hypoglycemic episodes in a year , but that is rare. I would seriously question their policy for not covering you as a type I diabetic. The only reason they may be denying it is becuase you and your doc have achieved goal hemoglobin A1C level (6.5 being the ADA's goal) (Congrats by the way:mrgreen: .) I know that when my patient's hemoglobin A1c stay above 7, the insurance companies automatically qaulify the patient (since they want better control) .
 
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kal-el

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bandaidwoman said:
strange, almost all insurance companies I deal with will cover an insulin pump for type I or type 1.5 diabetics (latent autoimmune adult diabetes), but not type IIs. This was based on a famous study that showed insulin pump therapy was superior to multiple shot regimines for prevention of diabetic complications. In fact, socialized medical countries like Great Britain automatically cover insulin pumps for their type I because they know they will save money in the long run. Some may stipulate that you need to have at least two documented hypoglycemic episodes in a year , but that is rare. I would seriously question their policy for not covering you as a type I diabetic. The only reason they may be denying it is becuase you and your doc have achieved goal hemoglobin A1C level (6.5 being the ADA's goal) (Congrats by the way:mrgreen: .) I know that when my patient's hemoglobin A1c stay above 7, the insurance companies automatically qaulify the patient (since they want better control) .
Yea my insurance company does cover it, but there are alot of stipulations. I think your hemoglobin A1C must be above 8 or something? My blood sugars always seem good, as my A1C is normal, but without testing, there could be extreme highs and extreme lows, and they all balance out to read normal. But I figure it's bad enough I have to stab myself twice a day, I'm not about to prick my finger 4X a day to monitor sugars.
 

Mr. D

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I have just been recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Trying to control it with diet and exercise is not my idea of retirement. I finally can afford to have a nice meal out, but I shouldn't! I've never been one for jogging or exercising regularly, but I'm trying to do a little better on that. I've improved my diet allot but it doesn't seem to affect my blood sugar much. The exercising is the tough part! I'm about ready to go on medication and combine it with reasonable diet and moderate exercise. I don't want to spend the rest of my life eating greens and twigs!

So who is knowledgeable on type 2 diabetes? :doh
 

bandaidwoman

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Mr. D said:
I have just been recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Trying to control it with diet and exercise is not my idea of retirement. I finally can afford to have a nice meal out, but I shouldn't! I've never been one for jogging or exercising regularly, but I'm trying to do a little better on that. I've improved my diet allot but it doesn't seem to affect my blood sugar much. The exercising is the tough part! I'm about ready to go on medication and combine it with reasonable diet and moderate exercise. I don't want to spend the rest of my life eating greens and twigs!

So who is knowledgeable on type 2 diabetes? :doh
Quick cliff notes:

Contrary to opinion, type II diabetes is usually genetically passed on to your descendents but the environment triggers it (lack of excercise, weight gain etc.) This is unlike type I or 1.5 diabetes.(not genetic)

It accounts for most of the morbidity associated with diabetes (diabetic retinopathy etc.) because it accounts for the greater percentage of diabetics. (It used to be called mild diabetes because most did not require insulin but epidimiology shows it accounts for just as much or more of the mortality and morbidity associated with diabetes.)

If you don't get good control of type II diabetes (keeping hemoglobin A1c below 7) 80% of type II diabetics will progress to requiring insulin.

Unlike Type I, most Type II diabetics actually make more insulin than the non diabetic in the early stages of the disease. It is a disorder of insulin resistance (your cells don't utilize the insulin that is there efficiently) . However, as the years progress type II diabetics can get beta cell exhaustion and that's why many require insulin later in the course of the disease. There are promising studies showing that medicines like the glitazones (actos and avandia) and metformin may actually help prevent or slow down beta cell failure unlike insulin secretogues such as glipizide and glyburide.


Weight loss is the mainstay of combatting type II diabetes as well as excercise. (I find the weight loss when accompanied by excercise has a greater effect than either alone).
 

danarhea

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kal-el said:
I have type 1 diabetes, and had it for about 13 years or so. I take a shot of regular and nph twice daily. I was thinking about getting an insulin pump, as I have heard nothing but good things about it, but in order for my insurance to cover it, I have to provide numerous documentation, in other words, they would rather have you take 4 shots a day, then to benefit from science advances.
The lead guitar player in my band has diabetes, and has to take several shots daily, along with constantly monitoring his blood sugar. He can no longer drive because sometimes his blood sugar crashes. His blood sugar levels are all over the place, and controlling it is difficult for him, which made him a prime candidate for an insulin pump.

Now here is the kicker. The VA was about to give him an insulin pump, but when he went in to have the procedure done, it was unexpectedly cancelled due to cancellation of the funding. He was actually being prepped for the procedure when the doctors were informed that he was no longer eligible for it.

There are quite a few other vets at the VA here in the Houston area who are getting the same treatment, which sadly to say, is none. One of them is our lead singer, who has hepatitis C. He was badly wounded in Vietnam, and this caused him to have constant hernias. Eventually, his entire abdominal wall had to be reinforced with plastic mesh. He contracted hepatitis C during that operation, but did not find out until years later. He had to sue the Federal government to get treatment, and finally, after his lawyer proved that it was the VA which gave him hepatitis C, he began chemotherapy with interferon last week. If he hadnt sued, he would have gotten no treatment, and this would have been tantamount to a death sentence. The government just kept stalling his case until they could stall no longer.

His chances of recovery are still 40% at this time, but his chances would have been a whole lot better if the government really cared about our vets, instead of just paying lip service to them. He is tough, though, and I think he will pull through. He still rocks, and plays golf twice a week. We are all pretty upbeat about his chances, and he is not suffering the side effects that most people get from the treatment. :)

Incidentally, we are thinking about renaming our band "The Old and Decrepits" :)
 
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