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Americans flee unionized, high tax states

cpwill

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Migration from high-tax states to states with lower taxes and less government spending will dramatically alter the composition of future Congresses, according to a study by Americans for Tax Reform

Eight states are projected to gain at least one congressional seat under reapportionment following the 2010 Census: Texas (four seats), Florida (two seats), Arizona, Georgia, Nevada, South Carolina, Utah and Washington (one seat each). Their average top state personal income tax rate: 2.8 percent.

By contrast, New York and Ohio are likely to lose two seats each, while Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania will be down one apiece. The average top state personal income tax rate in these loser states: 6.05 percent...

And, as ATR notes, “in eight of ten losers, workers can be forced to join a union as a condition of employment. In 7 of the 8 gainers, workers are given a choice whether to join or contribute financially to a union.”

Imagine that: Americans are fleeing high tax, union-dominated states and settling in states with lower taxes, right-to-work laws and lower government spending. Nothing sends a message like voting with your feet.
 

FilmFestGuy

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Migration from high-tax states to states with lower taxes and less government spending will dramatically alter the composition of future Congresses, according to a study by Americans for Tax Reform

Eight states are projected to gain at least one congressional seat under reapportionment following the 2010 Census: Texas (four seats), Florida (two seats), Arizona, Georgia, Nevada, South Carolina, Utah and Washington (one seat each). Their average top state personal income tax rate: 2.8 percent.

By contrast, New York and Ohio are likely to lose two seats each, while Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania will be down one apiece. The average top state personal income tax rate in these loser states: 6.05 percent...

And, as ATR notes, “in eight of ten losers, workers can be forced to join a union as a condition of employment. In 7 of the 8 gainers, workers are given a choice whether to join or contribute financially to a union.”

Imagine that: Americans are fleeing high tax, union-dominated states and settling in states with lower taxes, right-to-work laws and lower government spending. Nothing sends a message like voting with your feet.

Huh...and I bet it has nothing to do with warmer climates and the fact that our aging population has a tendency to move to warmer climates to retire.

Have you BEEN to Florida? There's a reason why it's called God's Waiting Room...

But never mind...go ahead and jump to conclusions.

I live in a state with NO income tax... and it's the 10th poorest state in the nation with nearly 1 in 13 people below the poverty line, so if I follow the logic of the article, I could say that low tax rates lead to poverty.

And I won't even mention the much more obvious reason that Louisiana has a smaller population...we'll just pretend that it's "taxes" as well...
 

Wiseone

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Like Filmfest said, there's plenty of other things that these states have in common with each other. Unless you provide actual data that the movement of people, and that it is a movement of people and not simply birth rate differences or anything else, is due specifically to unions and taxes than all you got is bull****.

In other words, correlation is not causation.
 

samsmart

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Yeah, I briefly listened to an NPR report that interviewed Gov. Rick Perry of Texas. The interviewer pointed out that while Texas had a growing number of jobs, it was also leading the country in the number of people imprisoned.

Here's the thing. We're in bad economic times, so of course people are going to try to get whatever kind of work wherever they can get it.

But the question is can those more conservative states sustain those jobs? Can they keep the people who have moved there? And how long will those states resist the actions of those more liberal workers who move there who may try to implement stronger rights for employees?
 
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