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America is losing its teachers at a record rate

Dittohead not!

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America Is Losing Its Teachers at a Record Rate
During the first 10 months of the year, public educators, including teachers, community college faculty members, and school psychologists, quit their positions at a rate of 83 per 10,000, Labor Department figures obtained by The Wall Street Journal show. That’s the highest rate since the government started collecting the data in 2001. It’s also nearly double the 48 per 10,000 educators who quit their positions in 2009, the year with the lowest number of departures.



Teachers are indeed leaving for a variety of reasons. I think that there are many factors unrelated to pay and benefits that make teaching more difficult than it used to be: gangs, out of touch bureaucrats calling the shots, too many children from dysfunctional families, more responsibility for the school and less for the parents, there are many factors behind teachers' decision to find another career.



 

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America is losing its teachers at a record rate

this sucks. my grandmother, both my parents, and my wife have dedicated their careers to teaching.
 

Josie

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This year I have said repeatedly that if I could find a different, less stressful job that I love that paid around the same amount, I'd be out of there in two seconds.
 

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America Is Losing Its Teachers at a Record Rate



Teachers are indeed leaving for a variety of reasons. I think that there are many factors unrelated to pay and benefits that make teaching more difficult than it used to be: gangs, out of touch bureaucrats calling the shots, too many children from dysfunctional families, more responsibility for the school and less for the parents, there are many factors behind teachers' decision to find another career.




You forgot all the pedophiles becoming teachers and acting out their sexual urges.
 

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That's on us, the parents. We send our little ****s to school, and forget about them...until something goes wrong. Principle office visit, bad grade, teacher conference, etc. And THEN what do we do? Blame the teacher, of course! They should have tried harder, taught my darling little angel better, or seen that they were being picked on, and that's why they acted out, etc.

Our youth are spoiled, because we've spared the rod, and are trying to be their friends, and not their parents. And ultimately, the ones who get stressed the most are teachers, because they are the most limited in options for what to do about it.

Then, add increased class sizes (because we don't want to pay taxes), unrealistic arbitrary expetations, Crap pay, and red tape, and, well...yeah. No one wants to do that job. Being a janitor pays better, and is far simpler.
 

Dittohead not!

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You forgot all the pedophiles becoming teachers and acting out their sexual urges.

Mainly because that meme is a bunch of

gallery_35324_1072_82907.gif
 

MrPeanut

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America Is Losing Its Teachers at a Record Rate



Teachers are indeed leaving for a variety of reasons. I think that there are many factors unrelated to pay and benefits that make teaching more difficult than it used to be: gangs, out of touch bureaucrats calling the shots, too many children from dysfunctional families, more responsibility for the school and less for the parents, there are many factors behind teachers' decision to find another career.




I can tell you that at least in my state pay and benefits are far and away the biggest reasons teachers leave. Those were literally the only two demands from the massive teacher's strike recently. I've got to think, from the outside, that the lack of respect for teachers in our modern culture also plays a part in people leaving the profession. I couldn't imagine putting myself in debt to get a degree only to be underpaid and overworked while local politicians talk about how lazy I was for wanting more.
 

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That's on us, the parents. We send our little ****s to school, and forget about them...until something goes wrong. Principle office visit, bad grade, teacher conference, etc. And THEN what do we do? Blame the teacher, of course! They should have tried harder, taught my darling little angel better, or seen that they were being picked on, and that's why they acted out, etc.

Our youth are spoiled, because we've spared the rod, and are trying to be their friends, and not their parents. And ultimately, the ones who get stressed the most are teachers, because they are the most limited in options for what to do about it.

Then, add increased class sizes (because we don't want to pay taxes), unrealistic arbitrary expetations, Crap pay, and red tape, and, well...yeah. No one wants to do that job. Being a janitor pays better, and is far simpler.

How has this been different the past, like 100 years?
 

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I can tell you that at least in my state pay and benefits are far and away the biggest reasons teachers leave. Those were literally the only two demands from the massive teacher's strike recently. I've got to think, from the outside, that the lack of respect for teachers in our modern culture also plays a part in people leaving the profession. I couldn't imagine putting myself in debt to get a degree only to be underpaid and overworked while local politicians talk about how lazy I was for wanting more.

Yip our illustrious Scott Walker led the attack on teachers with his act ten a d his divide and conquer method of governing.

The people didn't like it and elected the education superintendent to replace him.

Hopefully Wisconsin will return to the time teachers were not only paid fairly but actually respected for the difficult job they do.
 

<alt>doxygen

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My mom was a teacher. I'm so glad she didn't work in the current political and social environment. I think she'd handle the social aspect okay, but the demonizing of the profession by some of these empty headed stooges in the political arena, I'm glad she retired before that really got going.
 

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America Is Losing Its Teachers at a Record Rate



Teachers are indeed leaving for a variety of reasons. I think that there are many factors unrelated to pay and benefits that make teaching more difficult than it used to be: gangs, out of touch bureaucrats calling the shots, too many children from dysfunctional families, more responsibility for the school and less for the parents, there are many factors behind teachers' decision to find another career.




Another problem that crops up here (Canada) now and then is female teachers and nurses being lured by big bucks in Persian Gulf countries.
 

Dittohead not!

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My mom was a teacher. I'm so glad she didn't work in the current political and social environment. I think she'd handle the social aspect okay, but the demonizing of the profession by some of these empty headed stooges in the political arena, I'm glad she retired before that really got going.

I also taught in the public schools for 38 years before retiring in '04. I'm glad I got out when I did, too. Those "empty headed stooges" were bad enough then.

There are two professions that allow people to see the decay of society up close and personal: teaching and law enforcement. Were I back to being 18 again, I'd run like mad from either of those two career choices.
 

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You forgot all the pedophiles becoming teachers and acting out their sexual urges.

When your friends tell you those are their plans, why aren't you stopping them?
 

Grand Mal

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You forgot all the pedophiles becoming teachers and acting out their sexual urges.

Oh look. Bucky was here.
Anyone got a snow shovel?
 

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America Is Losing Its Teachers at a Record Rate



Teachers are indeed leaving for a variety of reasons. I think that there are many factors unrelated to pay and benefits that make teaching more difficult than it used to be: gangs, out of touch bureaucrats calling the shots, too many children from dysfunctional families, more responsibility for the school and less for the parents, there are many factors behind teachers' decision to find another career.




Also the high standard of requiring a 4 year degree. Who wants to go $60k in debt for a profession that has no career ladder to pay off that debt
 

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How has this been different the past, like 100 years?

Over time students have been empowered with “rights”. So the fear of reprisal for being a trouble maker has diminished. A student tells you “you cant do bleep to me” and the little **** is right.

Or how about teaching in a school where kids struggle with spelling and grammar, but know all the prison slang because they visit prison instead of church on sunday.

We have created a huge underclass that we deny exists because its makes us look at our ugliness in the mirror and wonder, “What the bleep can I do about it”.

Progressive leader of the world, California is competing with W. virginia (?) for that coveted last place award in education. So obviously, money is not the only answer. I lean more toward military levels of discipline, weighted gloves optional. LOL
 

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This year I have said repeatedly that if I could find a different, less stressful job that I love that paid around the same amount, I'd be out of there in two seconds.

my opinion means little, but keep at it as long as you can. some of us appreciate what you do.
 

Dittohead not!

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Over time students have been empowered with “rights”. So the fear of reprisal for being a trouble maker has diminished. A student tells you “you cant do bleep to me” and the little **** is right.

Or how about teaching in a school where kids struggle with spelling and grammar, but know all the prison slang because they visit prison instead of church on sunday.

We have created a huge underclass that we deny exists because its makes us look at our ugliness in the mirror and wonder, “What the bleep can I do about it”.

Progressive leader of the world, California is competing with W. virginia (?) for that coveted last place award in education. So obviously, money is not the only answer. I lean more toward military levels of discipline, weighted gloves optional. LOL

Money alone won't solve the problem, but that's one thing among others that is necessary. What you say about students' "rights" is right on the mark.

I can remember years ago we would put boxing gloves on kids who were determined to get into a fight and let them have at it. Imagine doing that today! We also had the use of a paddle when necessary, but I'm not so sure that's really a good idea. Detention/time out is a better option.

One thing for sure when it comes to student discipline: If the parents are against you, you lose. The kid loses, too, but he doesn't realize that until later in life.
 

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How has this been different the past, like 100 years?

I'd say there has been a huge difference just from the time I was in school. Kids weren't catered to when I was in school. Yes, we had a maybe a handful of students that felt they could walk a different line, but they were dealt with and learned to respect the people offering them an education. We never demanded "student rights" because we didn't like the rules. We didn't demand snack and soda machines or leaving the campus to get lunch at McD's. We also didn't have our noses glued to cell phones. My generation had stay at home moms (some dads) who saw to it we were learning and not disrupting. We didn't have school day care because simply put, we had no pregnant girls in the school or with children. We ate our lunches that were offered. If a teacher reprimanded us, we paid attention.

So yes, there is a huge difference in schools now verses the past.
 

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Over time students have been empowered with “rights”. So the fear of reprisal for being a trouble maker has diminished. A student tells you “you cant do bleep to me” and the little **** is right.

Or how about teaching in a school where kids struggle with spelling and grammar, but know all the prison slang because they visit prison instead of church on sunday.

We have created a huge underclass that we deny exists because its makes us look at our ugliness in the mirror and wonder, “What the bleep can I do about it”.

Progressive leader of the world, California is competing with W. virginia (?) for that coveted last place award in education. So obviously, money is not the only answer. I lean more toward military levels of discipline, weighted gloves optional. LOL

Yes, the students rights started rearing it's ugly head several years after I graduated and even then I thought when did the students start running the schools?
 

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Also the high standard of requiring a 4 year degree. Who wants to go $60k in debt for a profession that has no career ladder to pay off that debt

Well, I was $60K in debt after college and paid it off 20 years early with only a teaching salary. It can be done.
 

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How has this been different the past, like 100 years?

A lot of my teachers were men and WW2 veterans and had a more serious view of the world.

I remember a college math teacher who was a gunnery officer on a battleship and described to us how you would turn the cranks and dials to aim and compensate for the earths rotation moving you impact point. Yes we had to calculate it by hand!

I had another math teacher who worked for Aerojet during the missile race. The engines were prone to exploding. He came up with the idea of welding a steel cable to it then winding it around the case allowing some stretch for strain relief. We had to explain why.

I had a chemisrty teacher explain how Torpex (a high explosive used in torpedoes) was discovered by a missile fuel screw up that went Ka-Boom and rattled windows fifteen miles away.

These guys were the real deal.

These were guys who went out and did it. And they reminded you that you might be called upon to do it too!
 

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I also taught in the public schools for 38 years before retiring in '04. I'm glad I got out when I did, too. Those "empty headed stooges" were bad enough then.

There are two professions that allow people to see the decay of society up close and personal: teaching and law enforcement. Were I back to being 18 again, I'd run like mad from either of those two career choices.
I had a completely different experience.

I came from a background of banking, finance and marketing, went into high school public ed for the last 17 years of my career. While there are sometimes bad years, some bad classes, definitely some bad students at times, for the most part it was the kids that kept me at it. Loved it.

They are just modern day versions of us when we were younger, with more technology and even more distractions than we had.

They were the joy, a ton of fun once you got to know them, when allowed for their personalities to blossom. My one major dictum, told them the rules the first day, but most important was that we could have fun, them and me as well, its boring otherwise, we so often had such a blast... but it all stopped if the kids were not learning.

Refused, never taught to the test, never even looked at the previous tests, just taught what the kids ought know... and they always tested well... regulars, honors and above.

No, it was the adults, well, the few bad kids and their parents... and too many of the teachers, the administration and, worst, the whole cookie cutter system that began in earnest my last 5 years or so, in almost authoritarian ruthlessness taking control from afar our classroom, telling even exemplary teachers what they must have up on their whiteboards everyday, everything becoming dictated . For example, imposing a strict almost daily chronology not dictated by the needs of each class, but when all teachers of each specific prep MUST be at a certain stage of the curriculum. That, ostensibly so if a kid transfers from one class to the other there is a smooth transition... like each class wasn't different, there being no allowance to go back, reteach if a certain set of kids just were not getting it...

Rush on rush on...

Drove me nuts... and out early, certainly. I tried but just could not stand it... and the kids as well hated that every teacher was being coerced into being the exact same. Sucked for all where the rubber meets the road.

Guy, teacher I shared and alcove on our side of the hall, across from each other with our twin doors, standing there with the change of classes every hour... so we talked a lot. Very bright guy, one of those exemplaries I spoke of earlier, knew the system inside and out [his mother was in ed as a teacher then went "downtown"]. Worked it smart as possible, to a lesser stresser having 13 more years left he would often lament my last year there when I knew, we knew, that I was kicking it, outta there, heading to Panama...

Found out when I just went back to the states last month that he failed to show up one day. Like me, he was an almost every year a perfect attendance person.

Dude died in his sleep. Now that was a real loss for education... most definitely to his students. Sad, just too sad.
 

Dittohead not!

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I had a completely different experience.

I came from a background of banking, finance and marketing, went into high school public ed for the last 17 years of my career. While there are sometimes bad years, some bad classes, definitely some bad students at times, for the most part it was the kids that kept me at it. Loved it.

They are just modern day versions of us when we were younger, with more technology and even more distractions than we had.

They were the joy, a ton of fun once you got to know them, when allowed for their personalities to blossom. My one major dictum, told them the rules the first day, but most important was that we could have fun, them and me as well, its boring otherwise, we so often had such a blast... but it all stopped if the kids were not learning.

Refused, never taught to the test, never even looked at the previous tests, just taught what the kids ought know... and they always tested well... regulars, honors and above.

No, it was the adults, well, the few bad kids and their parents... and too many of the teachers, the administration and, worst, the whole cookie cutter system that began in earnest my last 5 years or so, in almost authoritarian ruthlessness taking control from afar our classroom, telling even exemplary teachers what they must have up on their whiteboards everyday, everything becoming dictated . For example, imposing a strict almost daily chronology not dictated by the needs of each class, but when all teachers of each specific prep MUST be at a certain stage of the curriculum. That, ostensibly so if a kid transfers from one class to the other there is a smooth transition... like each class wasn't different, there being no allowance to go back, reteach if a certain set of kids just were not getting it...

Rush on rush on...

Drove me nuts... and out early, certainly. I tried but just could not stand it... and the kids as well hated that every teacher was being coerced into being the exact same. Sucked for all where the rubber meets the road.

Guy, teacher I shared and alcove on our side of the hall, across from each other with our twin doors, standing there with the change of classes every hour... so we talked a lot. Very bright guy, one of those exemplaries I spoke of earlier, knew the system inside and out [his mother was in ed as a teacher then went "downtown"]. Worked it smart as possible, to a lesser stresser having 13 more years left he would often lament my last year there when I knew, we knew, that I was kicking it, outta there, heading to Panama...

Found out when I just went back to the states last month that he failed to show up one day. Like me, he was an almost every year a perfect attendance person.

Dude died in his sleep. Now that was a real loss for education... most definitely to his students. Sad, just too sad.

What you're describing sounds a lot like bureaucracy micro managing the curriculum and everything done in the classroom. That's one big problem with education: It's what <alt>doxygen described as "empty headed stooges" who are in charge.

It also sounds like you were in a school where most of the students spoke English, weren't affiliated with street gangs, didn't have an anti intellectual bias, and came from intact families. That may not be the case, but I'd guess maybe it is.
 
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