• This is a political forum that is non-biased/non-partisan and treats every persons position on topics equally. This debate forum is not aligned to any political party. In today's politics, many ideas are split between and even within all the political parties. Often we find ourselves agreeing on one platform but some topics break our mold. We are here to discuss them in a civil political debate. If this is your first visit to our political forums, be sure to check out the RULES. Registering for debate politics is necessary before posting. Register today to participate - it's free!

7 ways to bring back the PC: Fix or dump Windows 8

MoSurveyor

DP Veteran
Joined
Jan 25, 2012
Messages
10,016
Reaction score
3,900
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Undisclosed
That's right. Most desktop PC's in large corps don't have any special programs on them. They have a web browser which they use to access the in-house developed s/w.
Exactly. Why bother with an M$ OS for that?

As far as exchanging files in given formats, the reason we started doing it was because of the changes M$ made to their programs. (All we ran were Windows and Office.) Word for 2002(3?) had to be saved in a previous format for years because not everyone had 2002, yet, and 2000 and earlier versions couldn't read the new raw format. That lag went on for years and years and I doubt it's gotten any better.
 

sangha

DP Veteran
Joined
Jul 1, 2011
Messages
67,218
Reaction score
28,523
Location
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
Exactly. Why bother with an M$ OS for that?

As far as exchanging files in given formats, the reason we started doing it was because of the changes M$ made to their programs. (All we ran were Windows and Office.) Word for 2002(3?) had to be saved in a previous format for years because not everyone had 2002, yet, and 2000 and earlier versions couldn't read the new raw format. That lag went on for years and years and I doubt it's gotten any better.
It's called "thin client" when the desktop doesn't have the s/w running on it. The advantage of doing it that way isn't so much about the OS; it's really about not having to update a bunch of desktops everytime the s/w changes. If the software is running on a server, and users are connecting with a web browser or through a terminal server, etc, then all you have to do is update the server, and not a gazillion desktops

Imagine if every time DP wanted to update its' software, all of us posters had to download the update and install it on our PC's. Major headache.
 

MoSurveyor

DP Veteran
Joined
Jan 25, 2012
Messages
10,016
Reaction score
3,900
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Undisclosed
It's called "thin client" when the desktop doesn't have the s/w running on it. The advantage of doing it that way isn't so much about the OS; it's really about not having to update a bunch of desktops everytime the s/w changes. If the software is running on a server, and users are connecting with a web browser or through a terminal server, etc, then all you have to do is update the server, and not a gazillion desktops

Imagine if every time DP wanted to update its' software, all of us posters had to download the update and install it on our PC's. Major headache.
Many on-line games do that and, yes, it's a pain. On the other hand, our IT Dept used to update our machines at night by remote - and automated, I suspect, though I never got around to asking them.
 

sangha

DP Veteran
Joined
Jul 1, 2011
Messages
67,218
Reaction score
28,523
Location
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
Many on-line games do that and, yes, it's a pain. On the other hand, our IT Dept used to update our machines at night by remote - and automated, I suspect, though I never got around to asking them.
That's how one of the places I worked at before they went to thin clients. It's a pain because all sorts of things can go wrong.
 

The Giant Noodle

DP Veteran
Joined
Mar 22, 2010
Messages
7,332
Reaction score
2,010
Location
Northern Illinois
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
I don't have anything against Linux because I've never used it, but I think the Win7 task bar is much better that XP's. In Win8, you don't lose the task bar or anything else from Win7...except that unnecessary start button. In fact, what you get with Win8 is a full screen to take the place of the start button, a more efficient and a more secure OS.

shrug...

I've been using Win8 since release and I would never willingly go back to Win7.
I feel like the Giant Chicken that keeps fighting with Peter Griffin on Family Guy.

Metro SUCKS! NO ONE likes it! No company is going to buy Windows 8 because of the learning curve among other issues, one of them being Windows 8 is worse than Windows 7! I build my own computers and I would never buy Win8 because it is inferior.
 

Slyfox696

DP Veteran
Joined
Mar 8, 2013
Messages
11,201
Reaction score
7,380
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Moderate
It's called "thin client" when the desktop doesn't have the s/w running on it. The advantage of doing it that way isn't so much about the OS; it's really about not having to update a bunch of desktops everytime the s/w changes. If the software is running on a server, and users are connecting with a web browser or through a terminal server, etc, then all you have to do is update the server, and not a gazillion desktops

Imagine if every time DP wanted to update its' software, all of us posters had to download the update and install it on our PC's. Major headache.
Most companies with a large number of computers will have software to push out updates to the desktop clients. It's not really that intensive.

That's how one of the places I worked at before they went to thin clients. It's a pain because all sorts of things can go wrong.
Thin clients can be a major pain as well. We went to use nComputing Xtendas and they have been a nightmare.
 

sangha

DP Veteran
Joined
Jul 1, 2011
Messages
67,218
Reaction score
28,523
Location
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
Most companies with a large number of computers will have software to push out updates to the desktop clients. It's not really that intensive.


Thin clients can be a major pain as well. We went to use nComputing Xtendas and they have been a nightmare.
You are right about that. There are pblms no matter which way you go, but I didn't want to go too deep and muddy the waters.
 

Slyfox696

DP Veteran
Joined
Mar 8, 2013
Messages
11,201
Reaction score
7,380
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Moderate
You are right about that. There are pblms no matter which way you go, but I didn't want to go too deep and muddy the waters.
Understand. Anytime you have a large number of machines/users compared to techs, it's a problem. Right now we have about 600 machines, 1000 users and two of us in the tech department (and I'm only part time tech as I'm also part time teacher). We run pretty efficiently, but we still sometimes get swamped.
 

sangha

DP Veteran
Joined
Jul 1, 2011
Messages
67,218
Reaction score
28,523
Location
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
Understand. Anytime you have a large number of machines/users compared to techs, it's a problem. Right now we have about 600 machines, 1000 users and two of us in the tech department (and I'm only part time tech as I'm also part time teacher). We run pretty efficiently, but we still sometimes get swamped.
So you're a network tech?

In that case, when it rains, it pours. Something goes wrong, it's rarely a problem with one machine, particularly if you're using thin clients.

There are also problems with software scalability when using thin clients. Instead of having the processing on multiple desktops, all the work is being done on a server (or more than one), which may not be able to handle the load. Distributing the load introduces other problems like partitioning databases, keeping the concurrent, etc.
 

Slyfox696

DP Veteran
Joined
Mar 8, 2013
Messages
11,201
Reaction score
7,380
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Moderate
So you're a network tech?
I'm a lot of things. On the technology side of things, I teach a computer class, in charge of the website and repair/service machines and keep the network and its services running smoothly. The other guy is the "boss", so to speak, but we do the same things as far as responsibilities go...I just let him take care of the phone calls and paper work. :)

In that case, when it rains, it pours. Something goes wrong, it's rarely a problem with one machine, particularly if you're using thin clients.
It's even worse when it's machines in a school environment, where kids just love to play musical chairs with networking cables...

There are also problems with software scalability when using thin clients. Instead of having the processing on multiple desktops, all the work is being done on a server (or more than one), which may not be able to handle the load. Distributing the load introduces other problems like partitioning databases, keeping the concurrent, etc.
Or, and this is a problem we have, some software cannot open multiple copies of itself. Both Firefox and LibreOffice will only run on one of the workstations in an Xtenda setup, so users can't use either of them. Rather annoying, especially as we've been pushing the free/open source software throughout the school to save on money.
 

sangha

DP Veteran
Joined
Jul 1, 2011
Messages
67,218
Reaction score
28,523
Location
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
I'm a lot of things. On the technology side of things, I teach a computer class, in charge of the website and repair/service machines and keep the network and its services running smoothly. The other guy is the "boss", so to speak, but we do the same things as far as responsibilities go...I just let him take care of the phone calls and paper work. :)

It's even worse when it's machines in a school environment, where kids just love to play musical chairs with networking cables...


Or, and this is a problem we have, some software cannot open multiple copies of itself. Both Firefox and LibreOffice will only run on one of the workstations in an Xtenda setup, so users can't use either of them. Rather annoying, especially as we've been pushing the free/open source software throughout the school to save on money.
I see. It's a small shop, so you're Mr Dewitall.

As far as the cable switching goes, I believe that have cables with #'s on the ends. Maybe you can get them (budget permitting) and document what goes where by #.

I'm an applications programmer, and I'm not familiar with those products you mention, but I'm guessing it's Linux (free or cheap) stuff. I'm more in the MS VB, SQL Server, Java, HTML, etc world.
 

mbig

onomatopoeic
DP Veteran
Joined
May 14, 2009
Messages
10,350
Reaction score
4,989
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Other
How to make Windows 8 look like Windows 7 | Reviews | CNET UK
By Nick Peers on 27 October 2012
Windows 8 is provoking a Marmite-like reaction among users, but that doesn't mean you'll fall directly into the love or hate camps. It's more likely you'll find certain new features useful and others unnecessary. If you're pining for features no longer present, this article is for you.

In this how-to guide, I'll reveal how to water down or ignore some of Windows 8's more controversial features and restore functionality you thought had gone forever. While these tips aren't strictly about making Windows 8 like Windows 7, they address a few annoying niggles.

Bypass the Start screen and disable hotspots




When Windows 8 first loads, you'll notice how it defaults to the new Start screen. If you'd rather go straight to the traditional desktop we all know and love, download a FREE tool called Skip Metro Suite.
WinAero: Downloads / Software / Skip Metro Suite
Once installed, launch the program and verify 'Skip Start Screen' is ticked.

While you're here, you'll notice that you can also disable some or all of Windows 8's hotspots, allowing you to safely roll your mouse into the corners of the screen, without worrying about triggering the charms bar, apps switcher or Start button. They're all enabled by default, so simply untick those features you wish to keep before clicking Save Settings.

Restore the classic Start menu


The lack of a Start button (never mind Start menu) on the Windows 8 desktop is annoying, but there are plenty of options for getting it back. Stardock's Start8 costs $4.99
http://www.stardock.com/products/start8/
for a Windows 8-friendly design.
But if you want something more traditional (and FREE), install the Classic Start Menu portion of Classic Shell http://www.classicshell.net/ instead.

Once installed, you'll see the Start button appear -- click this to open the Settings menu and pick your Start menu design ('classic', XP and Vista/7 are all supported). Click OK and your new Start menu is ready to go.

Access Metro apps from the classic desktop

[........]
 
Last edited:

Slyfox696

DP Veteran
Joined
Mar 8, 2013
Messages
11,201
Reaction score
7,380
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Moderate
I see. It's a small shop, so you're Mr Dewitall.
Pretty much.

As far as the cable switching goes, I believe that have cables with #'s on the ends. Maybe you can get them (budget permitting) and document what goes where by #.
It wouldn't help the teachers, when the student pulls the network cable from the network port and switch it with a cable from the Xtenda port. That's the kind of nonsense that's extremely annoying. We can figure out where things go easily enough, but the teachers are utterly clueless, for the most part.

I'm an applications programmer, and I'm not familiar with those products you mention, but I'm guessing it's Linux (free or cheap) stuff. I'm more in the MS VB, SQL Server, Java, HTML, etc world.
Xtenda is the thin client product of a company called nComputing. Firefox is the web browser and LibreOffice is the open source alternative to Microsoft Office.

I'd love to learn more programming, it's just hard to find the time, energy and motivation after work. I have a good grasp on HTML/CSS, and I understand some basics behind PHP and Javascript, but it's hard for me to focus on grasping new knowledge on even those simple languages. I'd love to be able to write my own simple PHP/MySQL inventory database, but it just isn't happening for me yet.
 

sangha

DP Veteran
Joined
Jul 1, 2011
Messages
67,218
Reaction score
28,523
Location
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
Pretty much.

It wouldn't help the teachers, when the student pulls the network cable from the network port and switch it with a cable from the Xtenda port. That's the kind of nonsense that's extremely annoying. We can figure out where things go easily enough, but the teachers are utterly clueless, for the most part.

Xtenda is the thin client product of a company called nComputing. Firefox is the web browser and LibreOffice is the open source alternative to Microsoft Office.

I'd love to learn more programming, it's just hard to find the time, energy and motivation after work. I have a good grasp on HTML/CSS, and I understand some basics behind PHP and Javascript, but it's hard for me to focus on grasping new knowledge on even those simple languages. I'd love to be able to write my own simple PHP/MySQL inventory database, but it just isn't happening for me yet.
I would recommend starting with either Visual Basic (you can download a free version from MS's website) or Access (a database pgm which uses VB) to start. It's the most English like programming language.

If you do, feel free to ask me questions about VB or SQL. Even Access, though I'm no expert on that.
 

Slyfox696

DP Veteran
Joined
Mar 8, 2013
Messages
11,201
Reaction score
7,380
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Moderate
I would recommend starting with either Visual Basic (you can download a free version from MS's website) or Access (a database pgm which uses VB) to start. It's the most English like programming language.

If you do, feel free to ask me questions about VB or SQL. Even Access, though I'm no expert on that.
I dabbled once with VB with a tutorial, but it didn't seem like it was the type of language I was wanting to learn (it seems like it's more for desktop applications than web based applications...you would know better than I would though). How much different is something like MS SQL from MySQL/MariaDB? My knowledge on relational databases is quite limited.
 

sangha

DP Veteran
Joined
Jul 1, 2011
Messages
67,218
Reaction score
28,523
Location
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
I dabbled once with VB with a tutorial, but it didn't seem like it was the type of language I was wanting to learn (it seems like it's more for desktop applications than web based applications...you would know better than I would though). How much different is something like MS SQL from MySQL/MariaDB? My knowledge on relational databases is quite limited.
How long ago was it when you dabbled with VB? It's changed a lot over the years.

And there's a big difference between a database app and an application programming language

Database Management Systems (DBMS) such as MS SQL Server, MySQL, Access, Oracle, etc are an important component of any "real world" application. After all, most applications have a need to store and retrieve data. However, they are limited in what they can do. Basically, they store and retrieve data. That's about it (without muddying the waters with some of their more advanced features)

When it comes to these basic features, most DBMSs are "relational" databases based on an ANSI specification known as SQL (standardized Query Language). The standard specifies how to create a database and design the tables and how they're organized, edit the info contained in the database (add, edit and delete records in the database) and how to "query" the database to retrieve info from it. Because of the standard, most RDBMSs are pretty much the same, with the exception of special features that vendors add to distinguish their product from the rest of the pack. Aside from storing and retrieving info, a RDBMS doesn't do much by itself.

It's the application programming language that does most of the work in most "real world" business applications (Things like games don't need extensive database capabilities). When you think of a window (or a web page) in an app that is checking what you entered, and maybe performing some action based on what you entered, you're probably working with an APL such as VB, C++, Java, ey

Because of their more extensive range of behavior, APL's are more complex. They have more commands, and the commands have more variants than the SQL commands have. IOW, there's a higher learning curve. However, that doesn't mean it's difficult to start. You can start doing some very basic things. Books like "VB for Dummies" etc are pretty elemental.

Thinking it over, you might go that route, or you could go with Access. With the latter, you'd learn about databases and SQL (which is important) and it also utilizes VB for when you need to do something in that realm. It also has a lot of features to generate code so you might be able to develop a simple, useful app without having to actually write any code. This might be a good way to ease yourself into programming and there are also Access for Dummies books.
 
Last edited:

Mycroft

Genius is where you find it.
DP Veteran
Joined
Oct 27, 2011
Messages
68,670
Reaction score
26,969
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Conservative
I feel like the Giant Chicken that keeps fighting with Peter Griffin on Family Guy.

Metro SUCKS! NO ONE likes it! No company is going to buy Windows 8 because of the learning curve among other issues, one of them being Windows 8 is worse than Windows 7! I build my own computers and I would never buy Win8 because it is inferior.
I think of you as being more like Chicken Little, "THE SKY IS FALLING, THE SKY IS FALLING!!".

Anyway, one has to take what you say with a grain of salt since it's already been established that you've never used Win8, and therefore don't know what you are talking about. Heck, the writer you quoted in your OP didn't even know about Windows Blue. And that's the kind of people you allow to influence you???
 

The Giant Noodle

DP Veteran
Joined
Mar 22, 2010
Messages
7,332
Reaction score
2,010
Location
Northern Illinois
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
I think of you as being more like Chicken Little, "THE SKY IS FALLING, THE SKY IS FALLING!!".

Anyway, one has to take what you say with a grain of salt since it's already been established that you've never used Win8, and therefore don't know what you are talking about. Heck, the writer you quoted in your OP didn't even know about Windows Blue. And that's the kind of people you allow to influence you???
I have used it. Mentioned that many times. Youre just irritated that Ive been correct and you weren't regarding Win8.
 

Mycroft

Genius is where you find it.
DP Veteran
Joined
Oct 27, 2011
Messages
68,670
Reaction score
26,969
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Conservative
I have used it. Mentioned that many times. Youre just irritated that Ive been correct and you weren't regarding Win8.
You've used it?? That's not what you've said before. So, where have you used it...for five minutes in Best Buy? LOL!!

Regardless, you are not correct. You say no company will buy Win8...Wrong. You say Win8 is inferior to Win7...do you realize what a dumb statement that is? Win8 IS Win7...but better, faster and more secure...and with more features.

But that's okay, GN...you go ahead with posting your Chicken Little articles from dumb-ass writers who know just as little about Win8 as you do...and I'll keep poking holes in them.


oh...I forgot to provide proof that you are wrong. Here is an article from a guy who knows business AND IT...unlike the hack you came up with.

I’m at the HP Industry Analyst Event this week and one of the interesting cases it presented was that of Emirates Airlines’ experience with Windows 8 and HP’s ElitePad. Microsoft had intended to position Windows 8 as the iPad fighter and there was a lot of doubt whether it could perform at that level. However, cases are starting to show up that suggest Microsoft may have actually gotten it right. One such case is Emirates Airlines and at the HP Event the Emirates folks, both executives and employees, advocated the HP and Windows 8 solution strongly.

read more at: Emirates Airlines Advocates HP's ElitePad Tablets and Windows 8
 
Last edited:

PeteEU

DP Veteran
Joined
Mar 11, 2006
Messages
35,335
Reaction score
12,159
Location
Denmark
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Centrist
But that's okay, GN...you go ahead with posting your Chicken Little articles from dumb-ass writers who know just as little about Win8 as you do...and I'll keep poking holes in them.
Articles written on Apple Macs by journalists who stated that not having an SD slot on an iPhone was not a problem, but that not having it on an Android phone was a deal breaker.. those kind of journalists? :)
 

PirateMk1

Resident Martian ;)
DP Veteran
Joined
Apr 28, 2012
Messages
16,722
Reaction score
8,033
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Private
I'm going to take a guess and say you've never worked in the IT dept of a major corporation because your answer is total nonsense




Umm, no. Not even close. They might use Access as a database for the tax software that they sell, but if they use Excel at all, then they embed it into their apps as a control and control it through an API, something they would not be able to do is they switched to Linux. AFAIK, Linux doesn't offer a spreadsheet control that can be controlled by a programmer through an application.

But H&R Block does a lot more than just sell tax prep apps. They have offices all over the nation. They have software to track all these offices, their employees , their sales, work hours, profitability, expenses, etc.

They also have a bank, which offers savings accts, CDs, IRAs, etc. They also do loans. So they have to track their clients, their accts, their balances, interest, payments on loans, credit scores, etc

If you think they can handle that with a bunch of Access databases and Excel spreadsheets, then I don't know where to begin in order to correct that perception. Maybe you could consider how corporate HQ is going to figure out the business is going overall if this data is spread out in hundreds of Access db's and Excel spreadsheets in hundreds of local offices?



That is actually true, and does help with such a conversion, but at the same time it complicates things by raising compatibility issues.



Exactly! The fact is, at corps like J&J no one person knows what their software does or how all the different pieces interact with each other. So how is someone going to re-write the software when no one even knows what the s/w does?

And the cloud doesn't help with this. What the cloud does do is change the location of the files (including software files) from an in-house server onto a server run by the company running the cloud. It also relieves the owner of the files from maintenance tasks like keeping the servers running and performing backups.

What is working to solve the problem of all these files running around is products like SharePoint and Integrations Services, but guess what?....They don't run on Linux.



See my remarks about the cloud (above). And AutoCAD is one program, and not a very important one to most large corps. I'm not sure why you even mention it, but the company that makes AutoCAD could always put out a Linux version, but that's not a critical issue. The critical issue is the software corps have developed in-house.
AutoCAD isn't as big as it used to be. The standard nowadays is SolidWorks which is a CAD modeling, simulation and manufacturing solution. It is also going to be MUCH bigger here shortly as small and large companies start buying and using 3 dimensional printers more and for custom manufacturing. Its going to be an exponential curve on companies using 3d printers. By the way I recommend Dassault Systèmes as a VERY solid buy for your investment portfolios. Its going to end up very much like Microsoft in many respects.

As far as cloud computing goes, think it will probably end up being mainly a way to backup local computing and running Nonessential programs and to transition upgrades. It's a fad thing right now, but I don't see it as running critical business systems because of its dependence on outside companies, internet and server down time issues and security issues. Cloud computing can be leveraged for increased flexibility but I don't see it as a replacement like others do. People still use there computers even when there is no internet.
Bottom line when companies get burned because their internet went down they are probably going to do a hybrid solution that leverages the benefits of both styles of computing.
 

Slyfox696

DP Veteran
Joined
Mar 8, 2013
Messages
11,201
Reaction score
7,380
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Moderate
You say Win8 is inferior to Win7...do you realize what a dumb statement that is? Win8 IS Win7...but better, faster and more secure...and with more features.
It also is a pain to image, breaks compatibility with many applications, features a user interface with low desirability, confusion with with the UI apps and how they display and their ability to multi-task, etc.

Windows 8 has its problems.
oh...I forgot to provide proof that you are wrong. Here is an article from a guy who knows business AND IT...unlike the hack you came up with.
:lamo

You have a strange taste if supporting evidence. I just read the entire opinion piece you posted and there was absolutely nothing which told us how Windows 8 is great, only that HP and Microsoft was willing to work together to create an app for the airline, which did such important functions as track your likes and dislikes. Your article even said the iPad had security issues, while ignoring the fact the majority of malware is developed for Windows based machines.

I don't like several things about Windows 8 (which is why I will not use it), but I don't have a disdain for it either. But you seem to have an irrational love for it and will use anything to support yourself.
 

Mycroft

Genius is where you find it.
DP Veteran
Joined
Oct 27, 2011
Messages
68,670
Reaction score
26,969
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Conservative
It also is a pain to image, breaks compatibility with many applications, features a user interface with low desirability, confusion with with the UI apps and how they display and their ability to multi-task, etc.

Windows 8 has its problems.
:lamo

You have a strange taste if supporting evidence. I just read the entire opinion piece you posted and there was absolutely nothing which told us how Windows 8 is great, only that HP and Microsoft was willing to work together to create an app for the airline, which did such important functions as track your likes and dislikes. Your article even said the iPad had security issues, while ignoring the fact the majority of malware is developed for Windows based machines.

I don't like several things about Windows 8 (which is why I will not use it), but I don't have a disdain for it either. But you seem to have an irrational love for it and will use anything to support yourself.
I think you are reading too much into my posts.

The article I posted was in response to GN's statement: "Metro SUCKS! NO ONE likes it! No company is going to buy Windows 8 because of the learning curve among other issues..." The article clearly expresses otherwise. In fact, Emirates Airlines say the following: "One such case is Emirates Airlines and at the HP Event the Emirates folks, both executives and employees, advocated the HP and Windows 8 solution strongly." Doesn't sound like they are having problems with a learning curve...or any other issues.

Anyway, I don't have an "irrational love" for Win8...I've only been using it since release and I recognize it as a superior OS to Win7.
 

sangha

DP Veteran
Joined
Jul 1, 2011
Messages
67,218
Reaction score
28,523
Location
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
As far as cloud computing goes, think it will probably end up being mainly a way to backup local computing and running Nonessential programs and to transition upgrades. It's a fad thing right now, but I don't see it as running critical business systems because of its dependence on outside companies, internet and server down time issues and security issues. Cloud computing can be leveraged for increased flexibility but I don't see it as a replacement like others do. People still use there computers even when there is no internet.
Bottom line when companies get burned because their internet went down they are probably going to do a hybrid solution that leverages the benefits of both styles of computing.
I think a lot of companies learned a bit about that when NY was hit by Hurricane Sandy and their internet went out
 

sangha

DP Veteran
Joined
Jul 1, 2011
Messages
67,218
Reaction score
28,523
Location
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
Gender
Male
Political Leaning
Independent
It also is a pain to image, breaks compatibility with many applications, features a user interface with low desirability, confusion with with the UI apps and how they display and their ability to multi-task, etc.

Windows 8 has its problems.
:lamo

You have a strange taste if supporting evidence. I just read the entire opinion piece you posted and there was absolutely nothing which told us how Windows 8 is great, only that HP and Microsoft was willing to work together to create an app for the airline, which did such important functions as track your likes and dislikes. Your article even said the iPad had security issues, while ignoring the fact the majority of malware is developed for Windows based machines.

I don't like several things about Windows 8 (which is why I will not use it), but I don't have a disdain for it either. But you seem to have an irrational love for it and will use anything to support yourself.
The big advantage of Win8 is that it allows developers to write software that will run on a variety of platforms such as desktops, servers, and mobile devices. This is a big deal for business apps.
 
Top Bottom