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‘The ketamine blew my mind’: can psychedelics cure addiction and depression?

JacksinPA

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This week sees the opening of the first UK high-street clinic offering psychedelic-assisted therapy. Could popping psilocybin be the future of mental healthcare?

In the summer of 1981, when he was 13, Grant crashed a trail motorbike into a wall at his parents’ house in Cambridgeshire. He’d been hiding it in the shed, but “it was far too powerful for me, and on my very first time starting it in the garden, I smashed it into a wall”. His mother came outside to find the skinny teenager in a heap next to the crumpled motorbike. “I was in a lot of trouble.”

Grant hadn’t given this childhood memory much thought in the intervening years, but one hot August day in 2019, it came back to him with such clarity that, at 53, now a stocky father of two, he suddenly understood it as a clue to his dangerously unhealthy relationship with alcohol.

The day before, a team of specialists at the Royal Devon and Exeter hospital had given him an intravenous infusion of ketamine, a dissociative hallucinogen, in common use as an anaesthetic since the 1970s, and more recently one of a group of psychedelic drugs being hailed as a silver bullet in the fight to save our ailing mental health. To date, more than 100 patients with conditions as diverse as depression, PTSD and addiction have been treated in research settings across the UK, using a radical new intervention that combines psychedelic drugs with talking therapy. What was once a fringe research interest has become the foundation of a new kind of healthcare, one that, for the first time in modern psychiatric history, purports to not only treat but actually cure mental ill health. And if advocates are to be believed, that cure will be available on the NHS within the next five years.

Phencyclidine is another dissociative anesthetic but it is a banned controlled substance.
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These people all use psilocybin also which is a hallucinogen. DMT (N,N-dimethyltryptamine) would be another candidate but it is very short acting because it gets destroyed by the enzymes monoamine oxidase.

I personally found that using Cannabis helps you vocalize buried memories that can cause later depression.
 

noonereal

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This week sees the opening of the first UK high-street clinic offering psychedelic-assisted therapy. Could popping psilocybin be the future of mental healthcare?

No. These kinds of things are wasteful studies.
 

JacksinPA

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No. These kinds of things are wasteful studies.

Psychoactive drugs can make depressed patients more relaxed & open to verbalize in therapy.
 

calamity

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This week sees the opening of the first UK high-street clinic offering psychedelic-assisted therapy. Could popping psilocybin be the future of mental healthcare?

In the summer of 1981, when he was 13, Grant crashed a trail motorbike into a wall at his parents’ house in Cambridgeshire. He’d been hiding it in the shed, but “it was far too powerful for me, and on my very first time starting it in the garden, I smashed it into a wall”. His mother came outside to find the skinny teenager in a heap next to the crumpled motorbike. “I was in a lot of trouble.”

Grant hadn’t given this childhood memory much thought in the intervening years, but one hot August day in 2019, it came back to him with such clarity that, at 53, now a stocky father of two, he suddenly understood it as a clue to his dangerously unhealthy relationship with alcohol.

The day before, a team of specialists at the Royal Devon and Exeter hospital had given him an intravenous infusion of ketamine, a dissociative hallucinogen, in common use as an anaesthetic since the 1970s, and more recently one of a group of psychedelic drugs being hailed as a silver bullet in the fight to save our ailing mental health. To date, more than 100 patients with conditions as diverse as depression, PTSD and addiction have been treated in research settings across the UK, using a radical new intervention that combines psychedelic drugs with talking therapy. What was once a fringe research interest has become the foundation of a new kind of healthcare, one that, for the first time in modern psychiatric history, purports to not only treat but actually cure mental ill health. And if advocates are to be believed, that cure will be available on the NHS within the next five years.

Phencyclidine is another dissociative anesthetic but it is a banned controlled substance.
=========================================================================
These people all use psilocybin also which is a hallucinogen. DMT (N,N-dimethyltryptamine) would be another candidate but it is very short acting because it gets destroyed by the enzymes monoamine oxidase.

I personally found that using Cannabis helps you vocalize buried memories that can cause later depression.
I quit doing drugs. The downside far outweighed any benefit.
 

noonereal

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Psychoactive drugs can make depressed patients more relaxed & open to verbalize in therapy.

show me the body of science that supports this claim. It does not exist.

What we see are fringe studies and short term trials.

I promise you, this is wasteful to pursue.

Peace
 

JacksinPA

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show me the body of science that supports this claim. It does not exist.

What we see are fringe studies and short term trials.

I promise you, this is wasteful to pursue.

Peace
Here you go, for starters:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6041963/ 2018
Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy: A Paradigm Shift in Psychiatric Research and Development


Psychedelic medicine: a re-emerging therapeutic paradigm


There is an entire literature on this subject. Apparently these researchers don't agree with you.
 

noonereal

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There is an entire literature on this subject. Apparently these researchers don't agree with you.

No they don't but most do.

Thanks for taking the time to track these down. I'll go over them.

Peace
 

noonereal

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Oh, OK. I saw your other thread and did not realize you had two parallel threads.

Though I was hallucinating!
 
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